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Mathematicians are chronically lost and confused

Anonymous Coward writes | about 6 months ago

0

An anonymous reader writes "Mathematics Ph.D. student Jeremy Kun has an interesting post about how mathematicians approach doing new work and pushing back the boundaries of human knowledge. He says it's immensely important for mathematicians to be comfortable with extended periods of ignorance when working on a new topic. 'The truth is that mathematicians are chronically lost and confused. It’s our natural state of being, and I mean that in a good way. ...Speaking with experienced mathematicians, and reading books written by them, almost always feels like the following sketch about math class as imagined by kids.' He then provides some advice for people learning college level math like calculus or linear algebra: 'I suggest you don’t worry too much about verifying every claim and doing every exercise. If it takes you more than 5 or 10 minutes to verify a “trivial” claim in the text, then you can accept it and move on. ... But more often than not you’ll find that by the time you revisit a problem you've literally grown so much (mathematically) that it's trivial. What’s much more useful is recording what the deep insights are, and storing them for recollection later.'"
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