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MPAA: Plagarism good, Piracy bad?

BillGatesLoveChild (1046184) writes | more than 7 years ago

Privacy 1

BillGatesLoveChild (1046184) writes "The MPAA is fast to complain about their Intellectual Property being violated, but have no qualms about violating the Intellectual Property of others. The SMH reports another case of a Hollywood Studio plagarizing a film as their own. Adam Sandler's I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry (2007) is a tale of two firemen who pretend to be gay to get domestic partner benefits. Curiously Paul Hogan's Strange Bedfellows (2004) made three years earlier, is also a tale of two firemen who pretend to be gay to get domestic partner benefits. Universal Studios issued a statement claiming "the similarities are purely coincidental". The producers of "Strange Bedfellows" are amused but not convinced.

This isn't the first time, with similar accusations being made against Spielberg's Julie Newmar (1995) vs Priscilla (1994) and Eddie Murphy's "Coming to America" which the courts found was stolen from writer Art Buchwald. Add to that "Hollywood Accounting" fleecing artists (The Forest Gump movie didn't pay the author a cent in royalties), the Record Industry doing the same and the MPAA itself caught yet unrepentant for pirating movies. Before The Senate rushes off to do their bidding, shouldn't the MPAA and RIAA be ordered to clean up their own houses?"

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Shouldn't be too hard.... (1)

mark-t (151149) | more than 7 years ago | (#19993833)

If the similarities are accidental, then it should be fairly obvious simply by watching them. A similar premise alone is not copyright infringement, after all. For any copyright infringement claim to stick, the latter film would have to have similarity in its actual content to the former. In particular, one would look for things like the same jokes being used in the same context, or virtually identical lines being spoken by the characters. Enough of these sorts of similarities present would strain all credibility that the latter film could have possibly been uninfluenced by the former. Although I have very little doubt that Hollywood will wriggle out of this somehow... even if they _did_ copy the film.
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