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UK Gov: IWF list should cover 100% of UK broadband

wild_quinine (998562) writes | more than 5 years ago

Censorship 1

wild_quinine (998562) writes "The UK government stated in 2006 that they wished to see 100% of UK consumer broadband ISP's connections covered by blocking, which includes images of child abuse. 95% of ISPs have complied, but children's charities are calling for firmer action by the government as the last 5% cite costs and concerns over the effectiveness of the system. According to Home Office Minister Alan Campbell, "The government is currently looking at ways to progress the final 5%." With a lack of transparency in the IWF list, firm government involvement, and blocking which only 'includes' (but may not be limted to) images of child abuse, it looks like the writing is on the wall for unfiltered, uncensored internet connections in the UK."
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1 comment

Shame, but we've been living good for a long time (1)

Sir Groane (1226610) | more than 5 years ago | (#26956127)

(I managed to attract a flame when I commented on the New Zealand filter at El Reg [theregister.co.uk] - so let's see how I do here :-)

Basically, through superior techy knowledge, most of us have been able to access any information we like, of any kind, on the Internet. We've been able to access stuff that, under other circumstances, would be illegal in our own country.

For example, the UK, like many other countries, has a film classification board [bbfc.co.uk] that determines "for the public good" what can be shown in cinemas, licensed sex shops, or not at all. With our technical know-how we've been able to punch a hole in the UK's Customs border controls and, now that the government is getting more tech savvy, this hole is slowly being closed... There exist articles of content that, by UK law, would be illegal to import or own if it was rendered in some kind of physical media (books, photos, film etc.). There's no reason to expect a government would allow it to be imported via the Internet for ever...

Shame, we're no longer going to be able to moderate our own behaviour and viewing pleasure.

But, and this is the BIG POINT, ranting on about how "the Internet wants to be free!!!!" is misguided for (at least) two reasons:

1. it never was. It's a redundant network that had the nice feature of being hard to shut down or block off

2. the key issue is WHY are these things illegal in the first place! Write to your MP and get something done [writetothem.com] (yeah, I know, good luck with that when we're arguing against a "protect the children" mantra, but armchair activism really doesn't cut it).

Of course there's also the question of how good the IWF are at interpreting the law. [theregister.co.uk]
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