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Tech Startup Buffer Publishes Every Employee's Salary, Right Up To the CEO

1729 Re:what about your next job? (229 comments)

I just switched jobs, and my new employer asked for my current salary on the application and later verified this information during the background check.

about 9 months ago
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Fusion "Breakthrough" At National Ignition Facility? Not So Fast

1729 Fact check: LLNL isn't shut down (yet) (118 comments)

Because the staff and management are contractors, not Fed employees, LLNL is not shut down. The Lab will begin shutting down next week (assuming the budget boondoggle continues), but until now has been fully staffed with the exception of a very small number of people directly employed by DOE.

about a year ago
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NRA Joins ACLU Lawsuit Against NSA

1729 Re:The Enemy of my Enemy is my.... (531 comments)

There are a lot of us who support both the ACLU and pro-2A organizations. I'm not a fan of the NRA specifically, but I support several gun-rights groups (including the Second Amendment Foundation and the Calguns Foundation) as well as the ACLU and EFF.

1 year,25 days
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Surveillance Story Turns Into a Warning About Employer Monitoring

1729 Re:Private browsing (382 comments)

Google searches can be made over SSL. You could also tunnel to your home proxy server.

Unfortunately, a lot of employers perform MITM attacks to defeat SSL. I know my employer does. This creates a significant security risk, not the least because it trains employees to ignore certificate errors, but it's increasingly common.

about a year ago
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DoD Descends On DEFCAD

1729 Re:Rubbish (496 comments)

You really have no idea how bullets work, do you? The metal casings are for the bullets, not the guns. If you attempt to make a bullet with a plastic casing (you can't buy them), it will fail on the first shot. Not the second shot, not the third, the first. If you use plastic casings on a bullet, it will explode and you will fail. No debate.

Caseless ammunition already exists.

about a year ago
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DoD Descends On DEFCAD

1729 Re:Shock news: first Amendment has limits too (496 comments)

It never ceases to amaze me how people are able to seize on the Amendments to justify their own short-sighted, stupid, destructive, extremist and anarchist hankerings.

Of course there are limits to how far you can push your first-amendment rights; there have to be. See e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Amendment_to_the_United_States_Constitution and scroll down to Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes who formulated the clear and present danger test for free speech cases.

Thing is, Holmes was wrong in that case.

about a year ago
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LLNL/RPI Supercomputer Smashes Simulation Speed Record

1729 LLNL Supercomputer, not RPI (79 comments)

Headline is incorrect: Sequoia is at LLNL, not RPI.

about a year ago
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41 Months In Prison For Man Who Leaked AT&T iPad Email Addresses

1729 Re:Good (459 comments)

He didn't "break in". He sent requests to a publicly-accessible web server, and AT&T sent back private information.

Like sending "requests" to a publicly-accessible ATM using cards with other people's information on them, and then taking the money the bank "willingly" gives you.

Yeah, I totally see the difference between that and "breaking in" to an ATM.

No, that would be like to trying to impersonate people by guessing their passwords. In Weev's case, there was no authentication to circumvent.

about a year and a half ago
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41 Months In Prison For Man Who Leaked AT&T iPad Email Addresses

1729 Re:Good (459 comments)

Isn't a key element of the legal case that he also retransmitted the private information? He did not merely receive it.

From the court filing, it appears both charges are predicated on the notion that sending GET requests to an unprotected, publicly-accessible web server constitute unauthorized access under Title 18, Section 1030(a)(2)(C).

about a year and a half ago
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41 Months In Prison For Man Who Leaked AT&T iPad Email Addresses

1729 Re:Good (459 comments)

Meatspace analogy :

If a bank didn't have a door on it's vault, or any forms of security whatsoever, would you walk in and take out all the money? Even if you proceeded directly to the local police department to report the security flaw and deliver the unguarded money, you'd find yourself in quite a bit of trouble.

Here's a better analogy: you send the bank self-addressed stamped envelopes, and they willingly send private information about their clients back to you in those envelopes.

about a year and a half ago
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41 Months In Prison For Man Who Leaked AT&T iPad Email Addresses

1729 Re:Good (459 comments)

Nearly everything Weev does is malicious, but the question is: is it (or should it be) illegal? He was convicted of identity fraud and "conspiracy to access a computer without authorization". Think about that: requesting unprotected publicly-accessible webpages is "access[ing]" a computer without authorization". By that standard, anyone who uses the internet could be convicted of a crime.

about a year and a half ago
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41 Months In Prison For Man Who Leaked AT&T iPad Email Addresses

1729 Re:Good (459 comments)

He didn't "break in". He sent requests to a publicly-accessible web server, and AT&T sent back private information. This wasn't hacking, or even a DOS attack. AT&T is at fault here.

about a year and a half ago
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Mayer Terminates Yahoo's Remote Employee Policy

1729 Re:I might be old fashioned (524 comments)

When you work from home, you miss a lot of scuttlebutt, impromptu meetings, and hallway chats that electronic communications just don't make up for.

Yeah, but there are also downsides to working from home.

about a year and a half ago
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Reasons You're Not Getting Interviews; Plus Some Crazy Real Resume Mistakes

1729 Re:See ya, Slashdot. (246 comments)

Well, I'm glad Dice isn't deleting comments. Still, with the unlabelled ads slipped in as editorial content, this site is done.

about a year and a half ago
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Reasons You're Not Getting Interviews; Plus Some Crazy Real Resume Mistakes

1729 See ya, Slashdot. (246 comments)

We're getting this every day? And Dice is apparently deleting comments? Fuck that. Slashdot is done. Nice work, Dice.

PS: I'm on my way over to delete my Dice profile too, since the company is clearly incompetent and unethical.

about a year and a half ago
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Parcel Sensor Knows When Your Delivery Has Been Dropped

1729 Re:Existing non-electronic variant (145 comments)

From the article, the device is $2. BUT...they don't include the "coin battery" that it runs on...I'm guessing a 2032 or 2025, which will cost close to as much as the rest of the device. I do wonder how they get the cost of the unit that low, though...

Sure, if you're buying them one-at-a-time at Target, but you can get 50 CR2032 batteries for $10 on Amazon. Buying in bulk, they'd be even cheaper. (I go through a lot of button batteries, mostly LR44s, keeping my kids' toys running.)

about a year and a half ago

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