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Judge Issues Gag Order For Twitter

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:Information like this shouldn't be banned... (154 comments)

Information like this shouldn't be banned...It isn't going to work. A better approach would be to ignore or scorn those who would post such personal information about something that is purely a painful family issue.

I don't think your definition of "work" and the judge's definition are the same. No one expects that this info won't be made public on the internet. By issuing a gag order, however, the judge provides legal leverage to prosecute or legally disadvantage dickheads who are harassing this family. What we have evidence you got your religious friends across the pond to post this info in defiance of UK law? Guess who's church is now classified as a criminal group collaborating with foreign religious extremists to undermine the lawful authority of the commonwealth?

Mind you, I don't particularly support the legal system to undermining the basic right of free expression, but at the same time if these people are claiming the legal protection of the law for themselves, they have to acknowledge that just because a law is not practically enforceable does not mean they won't be punished for breaking the law or encouraging those beyond its reach to do so. And in the end that may be enough to at least quash some of these religious nutjobs and keep them from harming innocent people in their attempt to force their own religious beliefs on others.

more than 3 years ago
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FCC Commissioner Leaves To Become Lobbyist

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:You can't make talking illegal. (309 comments)

So only people who are unemployed can talk to politicians. Or do you want to make it illegal to give someone that particular job title? Do you see what I'm getting at?

I think you're being particularly obtuse. There is no reason that you can't give anyone any job title you like so long as they are not a government official. What laws should do is make it illegal for corporations and foreign governments and organizations receiving donations from either to contribute money to election funds; run political advertisements; or provide gifts, food, travel/travel expenses, entertainment, lodging, etc. to anyone in political office (elected or appointed) or to their relatives.

Sure you may not be able to ban individuals from going to visit congress critters and appointed officials, but you can sure as hell make them less likely to be received since they won't be bearing gifts or swaying an election in exchange for wink wink whatever. Sadly because of absurd Supreme Court rulings, such a law would most likely require a constitutional amendment, one that specifically states corporations are not individuals with the rights of individuals. I actually think this is doable as a grassroots reform movement and people could really get behind an independent party or group of politicians honestly trying to reform the laws and clean up the system. It certainly has popular support.

more than 3 years ago
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FCC Commissioner Leaves To Become Lobbyist

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:Only for high officials (309 comments)

In other words that XO is completely ineffective, since lawmakers don't work in the executive office, and she's free to Lobby congressmembers all she desires. Starting immediately.

Not completely ineffective, just not as effective as we'd like. The next FCC commissioner, for example, cannot have her over to discuss what Comcast would like changed by the FCC. That is a real benefit. The problem being that most people don't give a damn and are too easily distracted by other issues so they don't vote out the corrupt legislators that don't pass a similar ban.

It is actually quite interesting. The so called Tea Party is a combination grassroots movement and lobbyist/PR firm funded movement that manages to focus completely on issues other than lobbying. This is an issue where the vast majority of Americans: Democrat, Republican, and independent are in agreement. Not many people think it should be legal for companies and foreign governments to give gifts to or meet with lawmakers or provide them with campaign funds. It's just that people are too distracted by other issues to gather together behind reform candidates and vote on it. There is some chance, this is the purpose of the Tea Party, to prevent a real grassroots movement that does end up rooting out corruption and banning most lobbying.

more than 3 years ago
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FCC Commissioner Leaves To Become Lobbyist

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:Just Wrong (309 comments)

I thought there was a law against this.... Don't you have to wait two or so years before you can do this???

Congress refuses to pass a law. The Obama administration, on the other hand, issued an executive order the very first day banning lobbying by former members of the administration to executive branch employees. So because the legislative body is corrupt, she can lobby Congress. The executive is slightly less corrupt, so she theoretically can't talk to former co-workers or anyone in the executive branch (including the FCC) about law and policy changes without that member of the executive being fired. That's about as close to honest as we've been able to come in recent decades.

more than 3 years ago
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FCC Commissioner Leaves To Become Lobbyist

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:Only for high officials (309 comments)

When my father retired from NASA, he had to wait two years before he could work for anyone who did any business with NASA. Apparently this sort of thing doesn't apply to political appointees.

Executive order number 2, from Obama's first day on the job, bans lobbying for 2 years by former members of the administration. So no, there is no law, but there is an order in place that gets anyone in the executive branch meeting with her to discuss changes to laws or policies fired.

more than 3 years ago
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Chinese iPad Factory Staff Forced To Sign 'No Suicide' Pledge

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:Foxconn != Apple (537 comments)

Correct me if I am wrong, but Foxconn manufacturing is mostly Apple products.

You're wrong. Foxconn makes everything, the Kindle, The Xbox360, the Wii, The PS3, Motorola cell phones, Intel branded motherboards. Apple is a big customer, but only about 20% of their business.

So, I think Apple could have a great deal of say in all of this if they wanted to.

Apple does have a good deal of say, for the factories supplying Apple, which Apple regularly audits and requires human rights policies to be upheld. You can read their audit and required remediations openly published on Apple's web site as well as see a list of the suppliers Apple has stopped working with entirely because of human rights violations. Now see what information you can find on what all those other companies have done. Have any of them ever done anything to make things better? And it is Apple the Daily Mail decides to pin it on. Brilliant!

more than 3 years ago
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Chinese iPad Factory Staff Forced To Sign 'No Suicide' Pledge

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:(Foxconn != Apple) != (Apple = Good Guys) (537 comments)

Sorry, but Foxconn's other clients aren't as newsworthy. Logitech and Dell aren't big enough names to warrant a mention.

How about Intel, Amazon.com, Cisco, HP, Nintendo, Nokia, Microsoft, Sony, and Samsung? All too small to mention? I agree mentioning Apple gets more eyeballs, but because of their popularity and news appeal, not just size. Not mentioning these other companies is absurdly irresponsible reporting.

Apple does business with a company that works its slaves until they die, end of story.

Everyone does business with companies that work people like slaves, especially in the electronics industry. Apple stands out because jobs actually tried going to all US manufacturing with his company Next and because Apple is about the only company firing suppliers for human rights violations and requiring changes to woking conditions for factories supplying Apple. Moreover, they're the only company conducting audits and openly publishing them for all to see, including what changes they require supplier to make. And there is the worst part of all this. It pays to shut up and do bad things, because being open and honest about what's happening while working to make things better for people, just gets the press to write misleading articles attributing abuses at your competitors' factories to you.

more than 3 years ago
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Chinese iPad Factory Staff Forced To Sign 'No Suicide' Pledge

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:Pffft (537 comments)

This entire thing makes me a little embarrassed to use an Iphone tho it is required by work.

What in makes you think that other companies are any better in this regard? Apple isn't the only company that contracts with foxconn you know. That said, the apple pr department should be ashamed for not having a better response.

Apple is probably the best in the industry for working conditions in China and they do publicize that. Newspapers, however, don't care because Apple's popularity makes demonizing them sell more papers, even if it's doing so by misinformation. Apple audits their suppliers, publishes the audits openly and actually takes corrective measures. They dropped a number of suppliers because of poor working conditions, too long of hours, or child labor. They forced others to change policies and provide compensation to workers in order to keep their business. Basically no other company in the industry does this. Daily Mail should be ashamed of the way they spin Foxconn as an "Apple supplier" without mentioning all the other companies like Intel, Nokia, HP, Acer, etc. and not bothering to find out if the plants they are complaining about are the ones Apple audited and required changes at, or service some other company entirely. And they can't even plead ignorance because they mention Apple's audits as one of their sources.

more than 3 years ago
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Chinese iPad Factory Staff Forced To Sign 'No Suicide' Pledge

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:Irresponsible Article (537 comments)

However, I also believe it is necessary to bring this shit to light no matter whose demand is being supplied under these conditions.

Except, this article isn't "bringing it to light" it is obscuring what is going on by focusing only on Apple in a very misleading way. It is entirely probable some of the issues they mention are happening at plants making things for Sony(or some other company) because, Sony, unlike Apple has not stepped in to stop the practices. By referring to Foxconn only as an Apple supplier and not checking to see which company is funding the practices that are abhorrent, all that is happening is they are providing incentive to make things worse.

If Apple has to eat shit for using virtual slave labor abroad SO BE IT!!!!

That would be fine, if it were happening, but Apple is the one company that is not allowing them to use underage workers or make people work extreme numbers of hours. They're the one company that is actually investigating and firing suppliers for just those practices. But all that is obscured by the slanted reporting.

If Apple deserved any white night status in all of this, it would only be because upon learning of these abuses, they moved all of their manufacturing base back here.

They did at one point, or in a way. Jobs left Apple and founded Next which did all it's manufacturing in the US, not the third world. Unfortunately, people were not wiling to pay a premium for that and elected politicians who would not even enforce the antitrust laws on the books, so Next was purchased by Apple and went back to the status quo. So Apple does the only thing that they can to stay in business, prevent the abuses at the facilities they work with, using regular openly published audits and reports on what action they take in response to abuses. Sorry, but picking on the only company doing anything is really, really counter productive, and trying to spin what Foxconn does overall, not at plants making things for Apple, as though it was Apple's fault is likewise counter productive.

more than 3 years ago
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Apple Releases iOS 4.3.3 To Fix Location Tracking

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:Fact checking not a requirement for posting? (212 comments)

To produce a traffic database, the location of the phones must be read and transmitted to Apple. Claims that they only send location data and never pull it is clearly false.

The issue we were discussing is the list of cell towers and wifi networks stored on iPhones and which Apple has changed in this update. As for logging user location data anonymously, I'm sure Apple is doing so, at least they said they were when I clicked through the location stuff on the maps application in my phone. But that is a significantly different from what we were discussing.

more than 3 years ago
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Chinese iPad Factory Staff Forced To Sign 'No Suicide' Pledge

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Irresponsible Article (537 comments)

I'm all for investigating abuses in Chinese labor and dealing with them, but tis article is counter-productive. First, it constantly refers to Foxconn only in relation to Apple, not mentioning the dozens of other corporations it supplies. It repeatedly refers to facilities run by "Apple's supplier" but doesn't mention if they were actual facilities that make things for Apple and which Apple audits yearly and openly publishes information about and what they found and what action they took. It mentions Apples audits in the phrase, "...but its[Apple] own audit reports suggest suppliers in China may not meet up to these standards." It does not mention the list of changes Apple required from various suppliers nor the numerous suppliers Apple fired outright for violating Apple's human rights policy.

I find this article irresponsible because it is just heaping bad press on Apple (not the rest of the industry) when in truth Apple is the only company I have been able to find actually taking a stand and doing something about the problem. There is no mention of Asus, Sony, Intel, Acer, Nokia, etc. who are all supplied by Foxconn. Thus readers are misled into thinking Apple is the issue. All this article does is motivate Apple to stop publishing audits and stop all the good work they've been doing to remediate the labor problem. I'd like to be the first to throw a big "Fuck you!" to the Daily Mail for their irresponsible, slanted journalism.

more than 3 years ago
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Apple Releases iOS 4.3.3 To Fix Location Tracking

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:Implied Admission? (212 comments)

Isn't this (the update) an implied admission that the original software tracking was wrong?

Well, wrong in that it kept a large cache instead of a small one. Most users probably care a lot more about rapidly finding their location all the time than they do about the possibility that someone with access to their phone or an unencrypted backup thereof could generate a very rough estimate of their locations over time.

I don't see how it could have been coded in, and have had the behavior described to it, as an accident.

Then you have no idea what the software was doing. Why don't you find out by doing something crazy like reading.

What will become of the data already collected?

Data wasn't collected. It was downloaded TO the phone and cached there. The "collected data" was collected on your phone and stored there as well as in any backups of your phone. What you do with it is up to you if you have an iPhone.

more than 3 years ago
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Apple Releases iOS 4.3.3 To Fix Location Tracking

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:Fact checking not a requirement for posting? (212 comments)

My understanding was that what was being logged was not the users' locations but rather that of the nearest cell tower or hotspot.

Your understanding is flawed. It wasn't logging the nearest cell tower or wifi. It was, based on location, downloading to the phone a list of nearby cell towers and wifi networks (from a crowdsourced database run by Apple) so that when the user used an app that requested the location of the phone, this cache could be used to quickly generate a rough estimate and speed up the GPS location. This is a very useful optimization for most of us and the fact that it allowed people to generate a very rough log of our locations over time was simply an unintended side effect.

more than 3 years ago
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iMac Gets Thunderbolt I/O, Quad-core

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:The Sooner the Better (437 comments)

I thought the point was reducing cables. You still have two that have to be threaded under the desk (unless you have the poor taste to have outlets in the wall above your desk).

Indeed, you do need two cables run under the desk. I was merely pointing out that your assertion about my statement that I only needed one cable between my computer and desktop was not correct, probably because you misread it.

Again, for device to bulk storage transfers, you still need compatible hardware for direct transfer. I don't mean to sound like an ass, but direct FW transfer is a pretty damned small market.

It is these days, mostly limited to the professional market, but largely because Firewire never took off as a mainstream standard. There is not technical limitation to Thunderbolt that requires a computer involved in direct transfers, as USB does. This means if Thunderbolt does take off, this limitation is removed and all those use cases open up for direct transfer between devices of all sorts, sans computer.

I'm hard pressed to find a fractional need beyond the fourth percentile decimal that would require a physical drive local at a machine the has to be transported regularly or locked up.

Lots of people are lax about security, but not everyone. When it is simple and easy, I find it nice to put my work in a fire safe for the night, where burglars and accidents do not threaten it. For more sensitive contracts, it also greatly reduces liability.

more than 3 years ago
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iMac Gets Thunderbolt I/O, Quad-core

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:The Sooner the Better (437 comments)

after Apple's exclusivity agreement with Intel is up in 2012, you may start to see it pop up in PCs as well (from Anandtech's article)

That's great and all if it were not completely wrong and based on unfounded speculation as pointed out in this article that quotes Dave Salvator, speaking on behalf of Intel. He states that exclusivity is, "not the case. Apple saw the potential of Thunderbolt, and worked with Intel to bring it to market. Other system makers are free to implement Thunderbolt on their systems as well, and we anticipate seeing some of those systems later this year and in early 2012."

more than 3 years ago
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iMac Gets Thunderbolt I/O, Quad-core

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:The Sooner the Better (437 comments)

I like what Apple is trying to do here, but they should spend more time convincing Lacie, Western Digital, Seagate, etc. to actually ship devices that uses it and less time selling us on its thus-far untapped potential.

So they need to spend more time convincing vendors who have already announced products, like Lacie who you can pre-order a Thunderbolt Little Big Disk from? What more, exactly, do you want Apple to do? As for Western Digital and Seagate, do they even make drive enclosures?

more than 3 years ago
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iMac Gets Thunderbolt I/O, Quad-core

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:Summy is pretty confusing (437 comments)

Is it just me or the summary don't make any sense at all? I'm pretty tech savvy but I just red it three times and I'm still don't know what the article is all about.

So instead of reading the fucking article you thought you'd post about it? Brilliant!

more than 3 years ago
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iMac Gets Thunderbolt I/O, Quad-core

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:The Sooner the Better (437 comments)

Well, you mean two cables, right? One for power and one for data.

Nope, I plug my monitor power cord directly into the UPS, not into my computer.

And you're still going to have a computer between the camera and the storage drive* to negotiate the connection, unless you have a proprietary match.

Again, nope. Firewire over Thunderbolt can negotiate transfers between the devices directly with no intermediate computer, just as Firewire itself can now.

*Why on earth would you have a local storage drive on your desk if you're fussy about cables?

Because a portable drive is the easiest way to transfer large volumes of date, of course. Also for security reasons sometimes you have to take data with you physically, when you leave and put it in a safe.

I might also mention this is finally a published industry standard not tied to any one vendor that can work as a docking port for laptops, basically making traditional docking stations no longer needed.

more than 3 years ago
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iMac Gets Thunderbolt I/O, Quad-core

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF Re:Hopefully this accelerates its adoption (437 comments)

USB uptake on PCs was a function of Intel bundling USB for free on all of it's motherboards. The fact that Apple Corp left it's legacy users in the lurch really had nothing to do with it.

Which is why for several years there all USB devices shipped only in bondi blue to match the look of the iMac? Sorry, but Apple basically created the mainstream USB peripheral market before the PC market caught up and started using them as well.

more than 3 years ago
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iMac Gets Thunderbolt I/O, Quad-core

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF The Sooner the Better (437 comments)

I'm glad to see Apple rolling out Thunderbolt to their whole lineup and not restricting it to the high end. Anything they can do to promote this and get it mainstream for all computers will be a benefit to the industry and end users. Tangles of cords, switching cords, and unchainable unintelligent standards have been hampering us for too long. No, I don't want to have to have a computer in between my video camera and my high capacity storage drive. No, I don't want to have more than one cable between my monitor and computer and yes I want to plug USB devices, microphones, hard drives, etc. to the device on top of my desk instead of climbing under it. The throughput and flexibility here has been needed for a long time. Come on industry, full speed ahead with this one!

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

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Apple Audits Suppliers, a Human Rights Win

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 3 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "Last week Apple published the results of their latest supplier audit (PDF) for human rights abuses. The audit itself is greatly improved from last year including specific problems found and the action taken to correct the problem; including dropping one supplier entirely.

Highlights include ten factories employing child labor, hundreds of workers poisoned by toxins, and a trend towards even more excessively long hours. While many scoff at Apple's innovation in technology, I think we can all agree they are at least innovative on the human rights front, as pretty much the only tech company to repeatedly and openly perform audits of foreign suppliers and publish the results for all to see. Love or hate Apple, we should all applaud this and pressure other companies to do the same."

Link to Original Source
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Mac App Store, Success or Not?

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 3 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "The SFGate reports that the top ranking third party application in the new Mac App Store this month was Pixelmator, a $30 photo editing application that made their first $1,000,000 of sales in 20 days. That averages out to $50,000 a day. I wondered how this compared to the iPhone App Store in terms of potential income for application developers. Looking at historical data from two years ago, we see Bejeweled 2 was a top ranked app in the iPhone Apps store, which sold about 100,000 copies at $3 a piece in a similar amount of time for sales of approximately $300,000; or $15,000 a day.

I guess my take on this is that as an opportunity for profit generation, it looks like there is room for small players to become breakaway successes and earn similar amounts of profit on the Mac App Store as they have on the iPhone App Store. I'm sure some pundit will eventually perform a careful and statistical analysis of revenue/profit generation but, there does seem to be a new source of potential for profit for smaller developers looking to break into the market."

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Republicans Create Rider to Stop Net Neutrality

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 3 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Tex.) submitted a rider yesterday to a bill on military and veterans construction projects. The Rider would, "prohibit the FCC from using any appropriated funds to adopt, implement or otherwise litigate any network neutrality based rules, protocols or standards." It is cosigned by six other, republican senators. We all knew this was coming after the last election removed most of the vocal supporters of net neutrality and supplanted them with pro-corporate republicans."
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Computing Industry Misc. Settles Antitrust Case

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 3 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "Adobe, Apple, Google, Intel, Intuit, & Pixar finally settled their antitrust case over illegal hiring practices according to a press release from the Justice Department. The companies apparently had a formed a cartel with an agreement to not poach employees from one another, an agreement that harmed tech employees looking for work. All companies involved agreed to dissolve those agreements and not enter into any similar agreement with other companies. Hooray for a Justice Department enforcing our antitrust laws for a change. Hopefully they'll look into those Microsoft, RIAA, and MPAA things sometime soon."
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No HTML5 Hulu Anytime Soon

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 4 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "The Hulu Website briefly contained a comment the other day (since removed) explaining why they would not be implementing HTML5 video for their service:

"We continue to monitor developments on HTML5, but as of now it doesn’t yet meet all of our customers' needs... Our player doesn’t just simply stream video, it must also secure the content, handle reporting for our advertisers, render the video using a high performance codec to ensure premium visual quality, communicate back with the server to determine how long to buffer and what bitrate to stream, and dozens of other things that aren't necessarily visible to the end user."

They plan to release a dedicated application for the iPad and iPhone instead, likely a paid subscription service. Perhaps this is a good sign for Web based television as it will move more users away from the single locked down channel from the networks and to more diverse options less interested in extracting subscription fees (like YouTube)."
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Webkit2

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 4 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "Anders Carlsson and Sam Weinig over at Apple just announced Webkit2, a rework of the Webkit engine that powers Chrome and Safari. This new version of Webkit incorporates the same style of split process model that provides stability in Chrome, but built directly into the framework so all browsers based upon Webkit will be able to gain the same level of sandboxing and stability. Appleinsider has a writeup. Both Palm and the Epiphany team are going to be happy about this."
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CSS 3 - 3D transforms come to Webkit

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 5 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "For some time now Apple developers have been playing with CSS3's 3D transforms for graphics in Webkit, but unless you had a copy of Snow Leopard, there was no good way to try them out. Arstechnica reports that the latest Webkit nightlies, as of last weekend, now enable this feature on Leopard, so curious developers who have OS X 10.5 (Leopard) and who are willing to download the latest Webkit, can now experience the 3D graphical goodness themselves. The transforms are offloaded to the GPU and build on the 2D transforms the Mozilla team invented and implemented. The 3D version has already been submitted to W3C as a potential new standard. Whether you have the latest Webkit or not, you can take a look at a demo of a new photo browser using the technology created by Web developer Charles Ying. The results are impressive, if a little heavy on the eye candy for my Web browsing preference."
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Maine expands laptop program, Macbooks for G 7-12

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 5 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "The state of Maine announced last March their intention to expand their laptops for students program, called the Maine Learning Technology Initiative (MLTI). Since 2002 the state of Maine has provided an Apple laptop to every student in the 7th and 8th grades, one of the largest educational laptop programs of its kind. Cnet reports that the new expansion is finally rolling out, providing MacBooks for all students in the 7th through 12th grades. They currently have an order for more than 64,000 laptops with another 7,000 or so soon to be ordered along with accompanying support, services, and educational software from Apple.

Governor Baldacci is quoted as saying, "We are going to revamp our laptop program and turn it into a powerful tool for the entire family. Every night when students in seventh through 12th-grade bring those computers home, they'll connect the whole family to new opportunities and new resources." He's referring to software preloaded on the computers that connects parents to state run employment and educational resources.

Many similar programs exist around the country and the world, have experienced varying degrees of success. I wonder if such a program can be cost effective in the long run compared to the lower cost of netbooks and with the existence of educational focused Linux distributions. For now, the state seems very happy with this program and the results they've seen from it."

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Microsoft and EU Have IE Antitrust Solutions

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 5 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "Arstechnica reports that the European Commission is distributing a questionnaire to PC makers asking about a potential remedy for the Internet Explorer situation. Their remedy seems to favor requiring Microsoft to include alternative browsers with Windows. It asks specifically about how many and which browsers should be pre-installed with Windows. It also goes on to ask several questions about whether PC makers are being pressured by Microsoft on the IE antitrust issue.

At the same time Cnet reports that Microsoft has informed PC makers (via a memo) that they will not be shipping IE 8 included in Windows 7 within the EU for OEM versions. PC makers will need to add IE to computers they ship, if they so desire. This differs from a similar remedy the EU enforced with regard to Windows media player in that Microsoft will not be offering any version including IE to OEMs within the EU.

It seems from the difference here that Microsoft is attempting to cut their losses within the EU and voluntarily commit to measures to limit the market damage of bundling IE, in the hopes that the EU's stricter measures will then be abandoned. In this way Microsoft can continue with business as usual outside of the EU and with regard to Win XP and Vista and count on IE's large market share in the rest of the world to persuade PC Makers to include it within the EU as well. Obviously this is less of a threat than an EU remedy that forces the inclusion of alternative browsers within the EU, giving Web developers there the option of targeting something other than IE. One thing is certainly clear, the EU commission and Microsoft have differing plans that have not been reconciled."

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OS X 10.6 (Snow Leopard) Announced

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 5 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "Appleinsider's coverage of the WWDC notes, "Apple on Monday offered attendees at its annual developer conference an overview of its nearly finalized Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard operating system, which the company said will be available in September as a $29 upgrade for users of Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard." In addition to the approximate release date and price, the article details some of the features and improvements in the Snow Leopard update to OS X. These include: performance enhancements, 64 applications, smaller footprint, Exchange support, updated "Cocoa" Finder, some minor UI improvements, Safari 4, and a new version of Quicktime."
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EU to Microsoft, the Antitrust Issue is Not Over

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 5 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "The BBC is reporting that the European Union Commission has preliminarily concluded that Microsoft's bundling of Internet Explorer and Windows is a violation of EU antitrust law. The commission has given Microsoft eight weeks to respond before moving forward with the issue. Apparently since the US Dept. of Justice failed to correct the problem after their conviction for the same act, the EU has decided to give it a go."
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Safari 3.2, quietly released

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 5 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "Yesterday Apple quietly slipped out an update to their Safari Web browser to version 3.2, notable in that it finally adds anti-phishing technology an area where it has lagged competitors. Aside from that, it provides some security fixes, improved javascript performance, and a slightly newer version of Webkit, pulling their Acid3 score up to 77. Appleinsider covers the update in a short article."
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Apple's SproutCore, OSS Javascript-based Web Apps

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 6 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "AppleInsider published an article about Apple's new SproutCore Web application development framework, utilizing Javascript and some nifty HTML 5 to create a "cocoa-inspired" way to create powerful Web applications. Apparently Apple built upon the OSS SproutIt framework developed for an online e-mail manager called 'Mailroom'.

Apple used this framework to build their new Web application suite (replacing .Mac) called MobileMe. Since SproutCore applications rely upon JavaScript, it seems Apple had good reason to focus on Squirrelfish for faster JavaScript interpretation in Webkit. Apple, reportedly, hosted a session last Friday at WWDC introducing SpoutCore to developers, but obviously NDAs prevent developers from revealing the details of that presentation. Perhaps Apple is getting serious about Web applications and services or perhaps they're just worried about the Web becoming even more proprietary as Silverlight and Flash battle it out to make the Web application market built upon one proprietary format or another. Either way, this is a potential alternative, which should make the OSS crowd happy."

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Apple Releases Safari 3.1

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 6 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "Arstechnica reports Apple has released version 3.1 (a point release) of their Safari Web browser. I manages a score of 75 on the Acid 3 test, which is the highest of stable releases to date, but still significantly behind the nightly releases of Webkit, which score 93. This release seems mostly related to performance enhancements, with much improved (native) javascript.

Other interesting highlights include:
  • CSS animations (here's a demo of some working animations)
  • CSS 3 web fonts
  • HTML 5 media support (video and audio tags)
  • HTML 5 offline storage support.
  • SVG improvements


All in all, this looks like an evolutionary move, rather than revolutionary, but it is pioneering some of the newer Web standards. Now if only the EU would force Microsoft to keep up in standards compliance, Web development could be making some real progress."

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99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 7 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "For some time now a lot of us having been waiting to see who managed to bring 3D graphics to a Windows emulation/virtualization solution. It looks like Parallels is going to be the winner. They announced today an RC of Parallels 3.0, the final to be available "in a few weeks." For anyone else tired of bootcamp or rebooting to play a Windows game, it look like the answer is finally here.

I'm not counting out VMWare entirely. Obviously it will depend on how soon they can catch up and the relative quality of the solutions, but there is some serious first-mover advantage here. There is also some speculation on the forums that Parallels is rushing this out in order to sell product before Apple steals their thunder with virtualization support in Leopard (but I think that a bit unlikely). In any case, it looks like one more roadblock for switchers has just been knocked down."

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99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 7 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "A few days ago Apple quietly provided developers with overviews of some of the new features to be in Mac OS X 10.5, including two new security features that may help them maintain their reputation for security. The first is a Mandatory Access Control framework similar to that in SELinux from the NSA. The overview describes it as follows: "This framework, original developed for TrustedBSD, provides a fine-grained security architecture for controlling the execution of processes at the kernel level. This enables sandboxing support in Leopard. By sandboxing an application, using a text profile, you can limit an application to being able to just access only the system features, such as disk or the network, that you permit."

The second feature is even more briefly described: "Also new in Leopard is code signing. This means that Leopard will be able to identify applications by using digital signatures and then use that identification to base trust decisions on."

With these sparse details we can only speculate, but could Apple be planning a user friendly version of application level controls in Mac OS X 10.5? Will unsigned applications be sandboxed by the MAC framework by default? This could make implementing spyware, trojans, and worms a whole lot harder than any current mainstream offering. Will this bring fine grained security permissions to the masses, or will this be another technology that sits in the background with lots of potential but little real world use?

Also included in the overview are mentions of resolution independent displays, OpenGL 2.1 implementation, using multiple cores to drastically increase graphics performance, and other tidbits."
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99BottlesOfBeerInMyF 99BottlesOfBeerInMyF writes  |  more than 7 years ago

99BottlesOfBeerInMyF (813746) writes "Apple has posted some info for developers about the architecture and features of their upcoming Leopard version of OS X. Highlights include, resolution independence, OpenGL 2.1, offloading GPU feeding to a different core, Mandatory Access Controls framework, code signing framework, Open Directory, and Ruby on Rails tools."

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