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Comments

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French Provider Free Could Buy US Branch of T-Mobile

AHuxley Re:Perspective (36 comments)

Think of it as farming. You look after the truffle pig or milk cow and get years of productivity. The French understand this, like many other nations, you invest well and use the profits in other countries to build up real infrastructure back in France. Think of it as a farm or colony or investment. The extracted cash flows back one way :)
With the correct use of ads, plans and that new boss feeling the consumers will herd themselves for free enjoying freedoms, good value and choice.

2 hours ago
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UK Government Report Recommends Ending Online Anonymity

AHuxley No chance of ending anonymity (179 comments)

It gets expensive. You have to find an ip thats not yours every time. Late night you slip up just once and the resulting filtering, sorting will find you.
Add in the use of encryption or other acts will make the gov track all strange packets they find. The more they have to look, the more time and cash will flow until the reason why a person wanted anonymity or used encryption is uncovered.
A person would have to change all their computer hardware, software, never visit the same sites as their legal account, never use the same methods, slang, names, country - perfectly, every time they wanted anonymity. After a few years that gets to be a skill. The gov contractors and mercenaries have years to wait for that one slip up.
Also the people around you might have been turned many years ago when they slipped up one night.
It also depends on the other ip you use. If the account just looks at golf and work, to see the same 'persons' ip suddenly use encryption could be easily noted.
Lists go both ways, the normal to find stand out events and the users of encryption.

2 hours ago
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UK Government Report Recommends Ending Online Anonymity

AHuxley Re:Completely infeasible (179 comments)

Re "So, what are you going to use for ID? "
If you cant get a national ID system passed into law you do what Australia did after ideas around the Australia Card https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... failed (~1985 abandoned in 1987.).
A gov can demand a linked list of different types of ID to create a life story from gov issued paper work and gov databases.
In the end you have something like the 100 point check https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... for cell phones, banking, interacting with gov services.
No need for any national cards or huge changes. You just have to have the kind of documents any 'real' person would have: birth Certificate or passport, licence, id or permit or name and address documents. A selection of documents to build into a final legal profile.
What you had to show to open a bank account or get a cell phone could be requested by your internet provider and linked with every ip change to your account.
Even better, encode an isp issued like coaxial cable box just for 'you'.

3 hours ago
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UK Government Report Recommends Ending Online Anonymity

AHuxley Re:Legitimate concerns (179 comments)

" We only need to expose the criminals, not everybody else."
The problem with that is the scope of who gets to see the ip, persons address and how to flag the online activity.
What if a local political leader is seen using a tax payer funded car for personal use?
Say a staff member tips of the local press via online communications? That local political leader could then unmask the origin of the story using a simple legal data request made to look like a local gov was tracking a "criminal".
An automated database and form summited would not know it was the press or the staff member was the result as long as the right local gov clearance was used.

3 hours ago
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CIA Director Brennan Admits He Was Lying: CIA Really Did Spy On Congress

AHuxley No one calling for resignations (211 comments)

Dianne Feinstein statement on CIA torture report 'cover-up' Ã" full text (12 March 2014)
http://www.theguardian.com/wor...
"wading through the horrible details of a CIA program that never, never, never should have existed."
Feinstein accuses CIA of 'intimidating' Senate staff over torture report (12 March 2014)
http://www.theguardian.com/wor...
The problem is the issues go back to many, many years. Vital information was not passed on to the FBI about the movements of bad people into the USA.
Later after an event the FBI was then given files showing that same vital information existed via US gov staff in another country.
At a later date interrogations took place in a 3rd country. The FBI used wise open court interrogation skills that got a person to talk so a real US trial could be held. The CIA and their medial staff had a free pass to try torture. The FBI got results. The CIA got to try torture.
The CIA was in change of the site and communications. The CIA passed the results back. For years the upper levels of the US gov really, really wanted to hint that CIA got real results, so did the press with contacts and sockpuppets.
The problem for the CIA is the first hidden paper trail, the promotions that have been allowed over not sharing information with the FBI and then FBI interrogation results issues.
Kind of not so easy to tell the US public, press many years later.

3 hours ago
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Countries Don't Own Their Internet Domains, ICANN Says

AHuxley Whew. FFS... (101 comments)

Re The national ISPs would host their own root.
Yes nations would just go for a version of the classic Minitel https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/... with a nice web 2.0 feel.
Other nations would then set up their own networks understanding they could be 'next'.

13 hours ago
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Chinese Government Probes Microsoft For Breaches of Monopoly Law

AHuxley Re:So... (102 comments)

Two multinational telecommunications brands and a Linux distribution vs a PRISM?
Like many nations, best to go with your own staff, code, hardware and software long term. Too many eyes with the costly imports.

yesterday
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Chinese Government Probes Microsoft For Breaches of Monopoly Law

AHuxley Re:Monopoly Claims Are Only A Cover Story (102 comments)

Re 'being used as a scapegoat here"
If the encryption is weak and is shared with a few govs its better for China to walk away from all tame US products and start again withe their own code and software solutions.

yesterday
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Journalist Sues NSA For Keeping Keith Alexander's Financial History Secret

AHuxley Re:Now that you mention it... (171 comments)

Every encrypted use of the internet to and from the US would be of interest.
All the layers and data about the 'safe' encrypted message would be kept. Just using encryption would ensure further investigation and long term logging.
The consumer hardware is connected to a very tame 'internet', with tame telcos, tame VPN providers, tame crypto providers and issues like the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Communications_Assistance_for_Law_Enforcement_Act
The network as provided is fully open to the gov. Use a tame consumer OS or more interesting OS, your packets still flow and a few govs work very hard to collect all.
The advice that can be given by some top ex US mil/gov official is the low cost of hardware for ex gov staff and former gov staff now working for 'other' global banking competitors.
A lot of ex gov staff around the world know how telco and banking systems work and are for hire. What was once "five eyes" with shared bases global expensive is now banking sector affordable. Everybody now has the ability to buy some telco sector insight.
What can be done re consumer hardware? You have to walk, drive, fly to your bank and work out what product is best for you face to face.
Too many groups, people, ex staff, former staff have the same insights into networks. eg identify US unreported offshore accounts? Just watch people in the US logging into 'encrypted' super secret offshore accounts via that US telco as they look at statements, move cash around.
That unique ip/encryption stream would stand out. Over time all a bank needs to report is dual citizens and people on holiday. Everybody of interest is safe, meeting face to face with correct paper work :)

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: Is Running Mission-Critical Servers Without a Firewall Common?

AHuxley Honeypot (338 comments)

People can work out a vast complex network exists. All that national spread of small factory complexes with just in time delivery and payment.
Add in a tail end network thats waiting on international parts delivery.
So they find their way onto trusted systems and go for the main complex.
Finding a way in they use skill and poor design to transfer out 'plans'.
Some time later they spend big trying to make the plans work. Their own well funded lab comes back empty. Something is wrong, missing or it was never a real project.
To make the above work you need a vast amount of tame press telling the world about sloppy code, successful intrusions, countries getting away with decades of digital design over a few short years.
At a lower level its all about vendor lock in, ensuring the sale of that next version and then chasing the intrusion clean up work.
Systems are open to the net for a reason - as bait or to rent seek clean up contracts.

yesterday
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Nuclear Missile Command Drops Grades From Tests To Discourage Cheating

AHuxley Re:Why do we still have thousands of nukes? (121 comments)

Re"still maintain these ICBMs" is the key. Generations now expect a good paying job working on 1960's-90's tech for decades at a security level and gov pay grade.
Overtime they have turned that some of that gov pay grade into contractor positions.
The staff then have car, house, debt, hobbies - ie totally locked into the shareholder military industrial complex. Just as profiled for the position.
Thats a lot of contractor boondoggle and maintenance rent seeking over decades too. Kind of hard for the political class not to accept huge donations over many terms.
The systems stay, the workers stay, the staff stay, the profits are locked in and expected every year over generations.

yesterday
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Nuclear Missile Command Drops Grades From Tests To Discourage Cheating

AHuxley Re:The Air Force is also making an effort to repla (121 comments)

They have a fence around the site and the hatch system is secure. The electronic code system would have only been been seen by a few people to give the right code to the right site at the right time (one time pad).
The older staff would have worked out every control panel and lockout device due to boring mission hours and skills.
So you need the code sent in, a few people to send the code, more than 1 person to turn the key/get launch site ready.
The main issue is if the entire command falls under the influence of a faith based cult.
Lets hope the contractors who run the medical tests on the staff look for changes in the basic personality types used at the sites.
Other people would have the mission to track all staff off base 24/7 - phones, reading material, net use, new friends.

yesterday
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London Police Placing Anti-Piracy Warning Ads On Illegal Sites

AHuxley why do they even care? (159 comments)

The gov cares as the pay TV monopoly zones see having their wealth protected from all other providers.
You pay for months of pay tv to enjoy a new show per season. You dont get to enjoy each show from another nations computer company in near real time.
So expect to see a lot of pay tv efforts locally and internationally to protect each networked thiefdom .

2 days ago
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London Police Placing Anti-Piracy Warning Ads On Illegal Sites

AHuxley Changing The Controversy (159 comments)

Yes with the flow of cash old and new laws become an option. So you have a rush to set all aspects of streaming, p2p, downloading to a cash "moving" criminal legal standing.

2 days ago
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London Police Placing Anti-Piracy Warning Ads On Illegal Sites

AHuxley Waste of time (159 comments)

Over time you link banner in with a cookie, flash cookie and database cookie folders.
ie as with the first gen flash cookies you get a a unique ID and can be tracked online for a while.
What was once online marketing activities in 100KB deep in a browser is now todays police work.

2 days ago
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Senate Bill Would Ban Most Bulk Surveillance

AHuxley What on earth would be the purpose for this? (175 comments)

It makes searching domestic telco data legal under the "reasonable articulable suspicion" part.
A few hops of friends or the wrong net logs or phone history and most people could be found to be an "agent of a foreign power, associated with an agent of a foreign power, or "in contact with, or known to, a suspected agent of a foreign power"".
Then you get all the metadata legally. The old standard of a "reasonable articulable suspicion" is much lowered by easy new domestic color of law :)
No judge needed and you get the first two hops of tracking friends/family for free. The "foreign power" part ensures any contact with the outside world is an instant total data collection win. Bulk collection is now legal and the laws around it weaker re your internet or financial records. The three hop 'the corporate store" collections showed the real past efforts safe from any Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.
The House's NSA bill could allow more spying than ever. You call this reform? (26 March 2014)
http://www.theguardian.com/com...
Raiding the "Corporate Store": The NSA's Unfettered Access to a Vast Pool of Americans' Phone Data (08/02/2013)
https://www.aclu.org/blog/nati...
Welcome to the legal lock box of all your calls and aspects of your net use over decades.

2 days ago
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Senate Bill Would Ban Most Bulk Surveillance

AHuxley Who does the NSA report to? (175 comments)

Yes they are really only part of the intelligence community and report to each other. Mass surveillance programs brings new funding and political standing in that growing community. To have data and present it before other agencies is the only political win. No more doing limited support work of other appropriate agencies, via mass surveillance programs they get to set and shape real missions.
A change, new role, more power and more funding over other traditional agencies.
The problem is nations or groups worth real surveillance have be aware of the UK/US telco tech efforts since the 1950-60's so costly mass surveillance is the only method to keep the funds flowing and projects growing.
Will domestic mass surveillance be stopped? No it will be renamed, offered as support for other law enforcement tasks, hidden deep in the mil or passed to the UK or Canada. After a few project name changes all will be good again as it was after legal questions in the 1970's.
"Church Committee"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

2 days ago
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Satellite Images Show Russians Shelling Ukraine

AHuxley Re:News for whom? (571 comments)

Some AC sockpuppets really, really want another long war somewhere. Iraq, Somalia, what was Yugoslavia, Pakistan, Libya, Afghanistan with occupations, drones, shared sites, pirate/rebel hunt, training missions, pipeline protection, base help just will not keep the gov and private military industrial complex going. They need to sell and rent seek on an endless "Cold" war scale again.
So expect to see a flood of perfectly packaged news stories from different regions hinting at the need for constant support, spending, supplies, experts and boots on the ground for decades.

4 days ago
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Report: Nuclear Plants Should Focus On Risks Posed By External Events

AHuxley Re:How would that be even helpful? (130 comments)

Re "plant from the early 60s relates here"
Plants often come form nuclear reactor designs and prototypes from the 1950's and 1960's.
We are now seeing the results of a very old sector trying to rebuild itself with new parts. Replacement steam generator plugging (failed pressure test and needed to be plugged). We have seen issues with air tightness of the reactor containments, issues in the re circulation pipe systems, cracks in the core shroud.
Then you have the complex costs of cleaning out a boiling water reactor and a pressurized water reactor ie radioactive steam moves via the entire plant system, tritium leaks, spent fuel storage costs vs limited decommissioning funds. Moving to dry storage and then moving all the regular waste from decommissioning and dismantlement (disposal license). The old plants waste size adds up and all you have a few Class A waste sites? Class B and C waste with more long-lived and short-lived radionuclides can just wait? Weld anomalies, through wall corrosion, corrosion of steel containments, walls of steel containments below the minimum design thickness. The old plants have containment degradation, metal pressure boundary corrosion incidents. Add in the fun of uprated license extensions to 2040+ with a power increase (Stretched Power Uprate).

4 days ago
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When Spies and Crime-Fighters Squabble Over How They Spy On You

AHuxley Re:Secret evidence for secret trials (120 comments)

Re "Doesn't sound very constitutional to me. What have we become?"
In the past the GCHQ would do everything it could to stay out of court closed or open. No methods, no logs, no experts with no pasts to confirm documents as found, decrypted.
Any information gathered would have to be undergo parallel construction by other services or methods to remove any signal or decoding aspects.
The problem for the US is the very public talk of " all the phone records into a lockbox" to be reconstructed anytime over a persons life.
Within the US there is limited access to the top political policy setting. Other groups within the US domestic and more international law enforcement may not like a signals conversation with the public.
What the GCHQ only had to fend off every few decades in the UK with policy makers is now very public in the USA - total mastery of global telecommunications network with generational storage.
Slowly the other aspect is becoming more public too: "European Court Says CIA Ran Secret Jail in a Polish Forest" (July 24, 2014)
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters...
Its the age old use of signals intelligence - never tell the public and it is perfect. The problem for the USA is so many groups are now using signals intelligence that they all want the big wins in public and closed trials.
The problem is once signals intelligence gets out in court at a city, state, federal level - the magic stops. Every court connected member of the press, legal profession, law enforcement suddenly has a story to sell, tell or whisper.
Anybody who needs to know about crime and signals intelligence can then just buy the methods and drop out.
What did the UK learn early on? Dont give political leaders raw information about the Soviet Union - ever. Dont go to court over spies - ever. Dont go to court over leaks, whistleblowers or tell all books or for peace activists.
The UK knows the stories then just drop away from the front pages and drift off into academic books with very limited print runs.
The real unknown is the US cyber industrial complex with products to sell, rent and look after in every city and state if lobbied.
The West has become one big signals intelligence marketplace and laws need to be relaxed to enjoy new sales :)

4 days ago

Submissions

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NSA Admits Retaining Snowden Emails, no FOIA for US press

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  about three weeks ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "The http://thedesk.matthewkeys.net... reports on a FOIA request covering "... all e-mails sent by Edward Snowden"
Remember how Snowden should have raised his concerns with his superiors within the NSA?
Remember how no such communication could be found?
Remember how one such communication was released but did not seem to be raising direct concerns?
Well some record of e-mail communications seems to exist but they are exempt from public disclosure under the federal Freedom of Information Act."

Link to Original Source
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Australian police use telocs for cell "tower dump" of all connected users data

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  about three weeks ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "The Sydney Morning Herald is reporting that Australian federal and state police are using a no warrant cell phone tower metadata access technique called a "tower dump". A "tower dump" provides the identity, activity and location of all cell phones that connect a cellphone tower(s) over time (an hour or two). The metadata from thousands of phones and numbers connected are then sorted. Australian law-enforcement agencies made 330,000 requests for metadata in 2012-13.
Some US views on the same legal issues:
Judge Questions Tools That Grab Cellphone Data on Innocent People (Oct 22, 2012)
http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/20...
Will Telcos Follow ISPs and Extend Warrant Protection for All? (JUNE 17, 2014)
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/...
"Lawsuit seeks details on Chicago Police purchases of cellular tracking gear" (June 10, 2014)
http://www.suntimes.com/news/m...
"Records from more than 125 police agencies in 33 states revealed one in four used a tactic called a “tower dump,”....""

Link to Original Source
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The US legal system and secret laws: FOIA vs OLC, FBI, CIA?

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  about 7 months ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "Follow the ongoing EFF work on obtaining a document FOIA (Freedom of Information Act) requests have found to be exempt under "internal deliberations".
Are secret laws been used to provide more cover for a CIA's $10 million telco record deal?
Welcome to the world of past telco exigent letters and National Security Letters.
"FBI Replaced Legal Process with Post-It Notes to Obtain Phone Records"
https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/01/fbi-replaced-legal-process-post-it-notes-obtain-ph
http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20131107/13445725172/so-much-nsa-chiefs-offer-to-store-data-neutral-site-att-receiving-10-millionyr-cia-phone-records.shtml
http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20100121/1418107862.shtml http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20100121/1418107862.shtml"

Link to Original Source
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Mystery of 1000's of FBI documents posted to US press in 1971 solved

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  about 7 months ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "A team of eight antiwar activists broke into an FBI office in Media, Pennsylvania and removed at least 1000 documents.
Once removed and sorted, the bulk of the files showed FBI spying on US political groups. Cointelpro had been found.
43 year later more details about how the anonymously packages ended up with select US reporters weeks later.
Years later the full extent of COINTELPRO (COunter INTELligence PROgram) was finally understood.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/COINTELPRO"

Link to Original Source
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US mil drone visions to 2038: groups, more AI, lower costs, exports.

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  about 7 months ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "The US Department of Defense (DoD) has released a 150 page document covering its vision for the future role of unmanned systems.
The report mostly covers drones (unmanned aerial systems) use but offers insight into land, and sea technology too.
Pre-programmed tasks, new algorithms, more sensors, and complex machine learning will be advanced to help try and reduce projected funding needs. For example humans will not be needed for the duration of the mission until a drone swarm is released. The need to shape cultural hurdles, standards, and export regulations around the use of drones will also be worked on.
pdf at http://www.defense.gov/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=121392 or
http://publicintelligence.net/dod-unmanned-systems-2013/"

Link to Original Source
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US federal judge on laptop search laws at U.S. borders

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  about 6 months ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "The American Civil Liberties Union sought to challenge the Ul legal "border exemption" three years ago.
Can your laptop be seized and searched at the border?
A 32 page decision provides new legal insight into legal thinking around suspicion less searches, making copies, keeping copies.
"think twice about the information you carry on your laptop.."
“Is it really necessary to have so much information accessible to you on your computer?”
i.e. your electronic devices searchable and sizeable for any reason at the U.S. border.
ACLU may appeal. The decision: https://www.aclu.org/sites/default/files/assets/abidor_decision.pdf Also note the Kool-Aid comment."

Link to Original Source
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Pentagon could remove US Cyber Command from the NSA

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  about 9 months ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "USCYBERCOM was a powerful new command to conduct full spectrum military cyberspace operations created in 2006 and reached full operational capability by late 2010.
Could CYBERCOM be returning to its US military origin away from public spotlight of its more civilian setting in the NSA via the Director of National Intelligence (DNI)?
The NSA may have its powers returned to that of keeping US codes safe, ensuring international cryptography is useless, spying and its ongoing US domestic surveillance duties. The newer, coveted global operations role hidden before more relations by Snowden, other whistleblowers or investigative journalists induce public hearings?
Cyber Commands “offensive” operations on the Internet would then be secure form hearings, investigations or any new laws or limits.
Will part of the US mil get their offensive cyber warfare role back from an agency that gained many new roles in a very short time frame and much publicly?
Expect to see the spin of many classic sock puppets with good news stories about why the NSA needs its new powers to reach out globally and within the USA e.g.
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-10-31/document-reveals-official-nsa-talking-points-use-911-attacks-sound-bite
Some links about the role, formation and use of Cyber Command can be found at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Cyber_Command"

Link to Original Source
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Thomas Drake NSA whistleblower on allies and US rights

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  about 9 months ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "Thomas Drake a decorated United States air force, navy veteran and whistleblower from a position as a senior executive at America's National Security Agency.
His views on the 4th amendment, the foreign intelligence surveillance act and the role of an extraordinarily broad dragnet of electronic surveillance in the US.
The interview talks about countries going along with US surveillance as they feel they will never be caught and the telco tech is in place."

Link to Original Source
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NSA Cold War domestic operations declassified

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  about 10 months ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "With the US trying to understand the domestic role of their foreign intelligence and counterintelligence services in 2013, what can a declassified look back into the 1960's and 1970's add to the ongoing legal debate? Welcome to the world of Interagency Security Classification Appeals Panel and the work done by the National Security Archive at George Washington University. Read about prominent anti-war critics and US senators been tracked and who was on the late 1960's NSA watch list. From Rev. Martin Luther King to civil rights leader Whitney Young, boxer Muhammad Ali, Tom Wicker, the Washington bureau chief and Washington Post columnist Art Buchwald, Sen. Howard Baker (R-Tenn.). The NSA was aware of the legality of its work and removed all logos or classification markings, using the term 'For Background Use Only". Even back then NSA director at the time, Lew Allen noted: “appeared to be a possible violation of constitutional guarantees,” page 86:
via http://www2.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB441/docs/doc%205%202008-021%20Burr%20Release%20Document%202%20-%20Part%20B.pdf
What did the NSA think about signals intelligence sites in your country? See if your country makes the "indefinite" list on page 392:
http://www2.gwu.edu/~nsarchiv/NSAEBB/NSAEBB441/docs/doc%201%202008-021%20Burr%20Release%20Document%201%20-%20Part%20A2.pdf"

Link to Original Source
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Australia, NZ to get NSA GCHQ net encryption access too

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  about a year ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "Slashdot readers have seen and commented on the news surrounding internet encryption and who can get access.
The Sydney Morning Herald is reporting that the Australian Signals Directorate (was Defence Signals Directorate, DSD) and New Zealand's GCSB are expected to invited into the same initiative."

Link to Original Source
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Australian gov Ok with NSA spying

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  about a year ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "Australia’s Foreign Minister Bob Carr seems to be fine with US international data collection (spying) with the help of US consumer hardware, telcos and software vendors by the NSA (National Security Agency). It would seem the protections offered to all US citizens under the US "Bill of Rights and its Supreme Court, on where individuals stand in relationship to Government" will some how be offered to or balance out Australian law on privacy and data protection. Will a "lively political system" in the USA look after the privacy of Australians?
Network Ten’s Meet the Press program has the text of the interview here http://resources.news.com.au/files/2013/06/09/1226660/835253-meet-the-press-transcript.pdf"

Link to Original Source
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Using social media about military operations make you a target?

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  about a year and a half ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "Could using social media or blog comments about any military operation make you a legal military target? Australian army Land Warfare Studies Centre analyst Chloe Diggins looks at what could make a web 2.0 user a combatant.
The Geneva Convention protecting civilians could be removed if a power feels uploading, downloading or sharing is part of the fight. How long before "knowingly providing material support or resources to an entity that has been designated as Foreign Terrorist Organizations under section 219 of the Immigration and Nationality Act." becomes just "providing material support or resources to an entity that has been designated""

Link to Original Source
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US seeking a 15.7% levy on submarine cable operators

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  about 2 years ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "The US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is considering an expansion to the Universal Service Fund. Submarine cable operators with landings in the United States could face a 15.7 percent levy on quarterly revenues. Some history on US telco rates can be found at: http://www.commsday.com/commsday/2012/comment-bad-timing-proposed-undersea-cable-tax/"
Link to Original Source
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OzLog: unlimited private data retention for Oz law

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 2 years ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "delimiter.com.au has news on ISP data retention ideas in Australia.
Australia would like to follow the EU down the "European Directive on Data Retention" path.
Australian law enforcement agencies may have the option to request a log of all a users of interest telco usage without any review or time limits.
Another option would be for local politics eg. an activist community. Data retention over a postcode (suburb).
The data collection could also be out sourced to private contractors."

Link to Original Source
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What did your telco sell in Bahrain?

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 2 years ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "Follow the trial of interception technology as it is exported and supported around the world.
Documentation is divested and NDA's protect the deals done by telcos. Western-made and supported surveillance software offers tracking and transcripts that end in windowless rooms and torture."

Link to Original Source
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RIM CEO on BBC: India and Middle East

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 3 years ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "Recall:
http://mobile.slashdot.org/story/10/10/08/1454237/UAE-Says-RIM-Played-Ball-Will-Maintain-Service
http://mobile.slashdot.org/story/10/08/27/2137241/BlackBerry-Battle-In-India-Going-Down-To-the-Wire
http://yro.slashdot.org/story/10/08/07/1625245/Saudi-Says-RIM-Deal-Reached-BlackBerry-OK-If-We-Can-Read-the-Messages
http://yro.slashdot.org/story/10/08/07/1625245/Saudi-Says-RIM-Deal-Reached-BlackBerry-OK-If-We-Can-Read-the-Messages ?
Well try to forget, its really really unfair and a matter of national security."

Link to Original Source
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The top 100 IT suppliers to the UK gov for 2009-10

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 3 years ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "Using Freedom of Information requests the Guardian has listed how the UK are spending £42bn on IT.
12 departments and two non-departmental bodies.
On the top are BAE Systems and Detica. Hewlett Packard is third getting £1.63bn from five departments. GCHQ has an exemption."

Link to Original Source
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NSA jobs vs Silicon Valley over the next 10 years?

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 3 years ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "The hometownannapolis reports on a new cyber curriculum at a local high school to feed the ever growing needs of the NSA and Cyber Command.
A quote from Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD) about job growth in the local national security sector stands out: “In 10 years, we will be larger than Silicon Valley,” Could the new funding for the expansion of the National Security Agency and the Army's new Cyber Command be the next big growth area for the US?"

Link to Original Source
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Lockheed Martin's secret UK Census building

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 3 years ago

AHuxley (892839) writes "secret-bases.co.uk reports: Back in early 2010, Lockheed Martin – the prime contractor for the UK Census programme starting on 27th March 2011 – acquired a "secret" building on a 30-month lease for use as the data processing centre for uploaded census forms. The location was found after a senior Lockheed Martin / UK Data Capture employee registered an associated domain on a server whose IP address network, belonging to Lockheed Martin, was itself registered to the precise address of the building. The US spelling of "centre" was also noted."
Link to Original Source

Journals

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Glenn Greenwald Keynote 30c3

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  about 7 months ago http://www.dw.de/glenn-greenwald-calls-for-snowden-asylum-at-chaos-computer-club-congress/a-17327867
https://soundcloud.com/dlf-wissenschaft/keynote-glenn-greenwald-30c3
Into details of Hong kong - understanding TrueCrypt use.
World understanding about protecting own security, notes more PGP use in his email.
Limits on US surveillance, debate, political, legal reform - PR.
Secret court oversight - rubber stamp, role of generations of gov loyalists.
Hope with skills of the developers of encryption to protect communications - slows down rate of privacy loss.
PR of been seen at hacker events by US gov officials.
Will **you** work to help destroy privacy?
Act of conscience is spreading - Chelsea Manning, Daniel Ellsberg, wikileaks,
Price of transparency - gov punishment vs growing lists of whistleblowers -effective use of fear
Inspiration of more whistleblowers?
EU leaders greatly helped by Snowden news but not willing to help Snowden.
New book - role of free press vs tame US/UK media, gov false claims to public
Iraq war reflections, Snowden first doc.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boundless_Informant
Tame media, no oversight, US/UK media
Five eyes - no more privacy globally for electronic communications.
Q&A:
All communications tracked by govs, motivation - economic, politically - down to one goal: power.
What to release - powerful debate, interest - 6 months into, more on way.
True face of UK gov vs press freedom - now a joke.
German gov support of NSA - no change to German policy

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Australian intelligence on cyber security, data acquisition, the private sector.

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 2 years ago http://www.asio.gov.au/Publications/Public-Statements/2012/24-Jan-2012-Sydney-Institute.html An interesting paper on the "malicious by-product, of the information technology age"
Are the Australian public gradually become aware of their own privacy as they use information technology?

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NewsRight and your next /. story link?

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 2 years ago With http://paidcontent.org/article/419-newsright-launches-with-29-publishers-not-a-litigation-shop/ seeking to set up "business relationships and contracts" for their online content.
Could it be time for a link database to see if a link been posted goes back to a NewsRight member?

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Bungies 1998 Myth 2 (private) beta Linux testing

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 2 years ago http://tain.totalcodex.net/forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=5451#p53236
Myth 2 was a 1998 real-time tactics computer game for the PC/Macintosh (and in the past Linux).
A new native Linux executable version of 1.7.2 (current Mac/Win) seems to be in testing.

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Kentucky police search homes without a warrant based on smell/sounds

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 3 years ago The nytimes reports on how Justices Look Again at How Police May Search Homes after a case in Kentucky where police smelled burning marijuana coming from an apartment and kicked the door in.
Justice Kagan said, âoeis going to enable the police to penetrate the home, to search the home, without a warrant, without going to see a magistrate, in a very wide variety of cases.â
"He said a sensible criminal would answer the door but decline to let the police enter without a warrant."

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New zero-day hole in Flash Player

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 3 years ago http://news.cnet.com/8301-27080_3-20016301-245.html
A new zero-day hole in Flash Player that reportedly is being exploited in the wild and could allow an attacker to take control of a computer.
The critical vulnerability affects Adobe Flash Player 10.1.82.76 and earlier versions for Windows, Mac, Linux, Solaris, and Android.
It also affects Adobe Reader 9.3.4 and earlier version for Windows, Mac, and Unix and Adobe Acrobat 9.3.4 and earlier versions for Windows and Mac.

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Apple's Facetime Open standards, closed link?

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 3 years ago Was just reading http://herot.typepad.com/cherot/2010/06/iphone-facetime-protocol.html that links to
http://www.packetstan.com/2010/07/special-look-face-time-part-1.html
http://www.packetstan.com/2010/07/special-look-face-time-part-2-sip-and.html
http://www.packetstan.com/2010/07/special-look-face-time-part-3-call.html
The "client-side SSL certificate, giving Apple the ability to grant or deny access on a per-device basis" is known, but has anything changed with the new touch?

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OS X, Disk Utility and the 3 strange ip's

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 3 years ago Last night I was reading http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/09/09/ios_4_dot_1_jailbreak/
I clicked on the " was first announced by" link to http://twitter.com/pod2g/status/23950781610
Suddenly "Disk Utility" starts up and Little Snitch shows connections to "business.twitter.com" and the 3 ip's
128.242.245.116, 128.242.245.20, 128.242.245.212
http://img138.imageshack.us/img138/6296/duip.jpg
2010-09-09 22:12:32 +0930: Checksumming âoe23950781610â using UDIF-CRC32 was also recorded in the Disk Utility log.
Disk Utility is a utility created by Apple for performing disk-related tasks in Mac OS X.
Little Snitch is a software outgoing firewall for Mac OS X.
Any ideas? Thanks.

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Legality of Oz net filter trials?

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  about 4 years ago http://www.zdnet.com.au/net-filter-trials-unlawful-claims-engineer-339304184.htm

An Australia network engineer Mark Newton has been asking about the intercepted customers' internet traffic aspect of the Australian filter trial. Australia seems to be using a Marshall R3000 series for web monitoring, filtering and reporting.
This may breached section 7(1)(b) of the Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act 1979. by "authorising, suffering or permitting said equipment to be used in that manner".
""A copy of every single packet of data generated by an end user and sent to the internet is supplied to a network switch's 'mirrored port' and forwarded to whatever device is connected to it," Newton told the department. "Although the vendor makes the unverified claim that the R3000 only 'inspects' outgoing web requests and, in those requests, only examines destination URLs, a complete transcript of all internet data is nevertheless supplied to the R3000 for monitoring."
" The department continues to believe its internet filtering live trials had not breached the Act.
More on the filter trail tech used in Australia http://www.arnnet.com.au/article/307138/internet_filter_isps_reveal_clean-filter_technologies/?fp=16&fpid=1

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Oz telco network maps a security risk

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 3 years ago zdnet writes Telstra and Optus say a proposal by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) to publish infrastructure location information could be a risk to security.
Telstra said in its response to the discussion that only limited infrastructure information should be published to carriers and carriage service providers and should not be given to the general public.
Telstra notes "persons â" both within Australia and overseas â" determined to assault the public health and safety of Australian people and institutions, could access publicly available certain telecommunications network information to precisely identify points of access to the network."
Is someone worried the public will add up the costs of a low redundancy choke points in the telco network and ask where all the cash went? Does Australia need a Sean Gorman to map our networks?
http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/12.01/start.html?pg=10

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Pentagon tries mind-control in Afghanistan

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 4 years ago http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2010/06/to-reach-afghans-pentagon-drafts-mimes-storytellers-wizard-of-oz/#more-26471
Mind-control and social engineering keeps the masses in the USA passive and stuck in their own little worlds.
So the Pentagon is trying to convince Afghanistan to accept endless advertising, mass media, polls, celebrities and sports figures in a culturally-specific narrative.
Pentagon-funded researchers are building computer models of how the societies of Afghanistan and Iraq work http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2009/03/darpas-social-s/
and releasing neuroscientists, artificial intelligence specialists, and gadgeteers for real world testing.
A demo will start vis Wizard of Oz and then allow the US to roll out ideas for grass roots organizing and collective decision making.
Someone dust off the Vietnam era http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Operations_and_Revolutionary_Development_Support for the web 2.0 generation?

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Police push to continue warrantless cell tracking

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 4 years ago http://news.cnet.com/8301-31921_3-20008941-281.html
"A law requiring police to obtain a search warrant before tracking Americans' cell phones may imperil criminal investigations and endanger children's lives, a law enforcement representative told Congress this week."
"Obtaining a search warrant when monitoring the whereabouts of someone "who may be attempting to victimize a child over the Internet will have a significant slowing effect on the processing of child exploitation leads," said Richard Littlehale of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. "If that is acceptable, so be it, but it is a downstream effect that must be considered.""
"Connecticut federal judge shows that the FBI monitored the whereabouts of about 180 cell phones--without a warrant--while conducting surveillance of two men suspected of robbing local banks."

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Windows Messenger 4: No video for you!

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 4 years ago http://arstechnica.com/microsoft/news/2010/06/windows-live-messenger-wave-4-almost-excellent-fatally-flawed.ars
"Video Call" is obviously more limited. If one party has no webcam, there's no Video Call option. If one party doesn't want to broadcast their webcam, or their microphone, video call isn't an option. And yet the new Messenger discards the basic webcam features. It's video call or nothing. I have nothing against Video Calls, and use the feature from time to time. But I use the basic webcam capabilities more. It's not a bug. It's not an accidental omission. It's a deliberate decision by Microsoft: the new Messenger will have only one webcam mode, and it's Video Call. The company claims that by concentrating on one webcam mode they can make it better. Apparently the picture quality is improved." Why not just use a mic icon if you have sound only? Yahoo, tinychat ect let the users use any audio, visual or text chat they like and it all works fine from adsl 2+ to 56k, 1 on 1 or groups.

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Bing-Zune integration still not working

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 4 years ago http://news.cnet.com/8301-13526_3-20008931-27.html
"this time, the player told me that I needed to enable application storage in my version of the Silverlight player. (Silverlight is a Microsoft platform for creating rich Internet applications, like audio and video, and basically competes with Adobe's Flash.) A casual user would have given up, but having a professional interest in the feature, I followed the instructions on the screen, only to find that my copy of Silverlight already had the box checked to enable application storage. Sigh. I unchecked and rechecked it. Still no luck. "

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More on Google remote app wipe

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 4 years ago http://news.cnet.com/8301-27080_3-20008922-245.html
Google has remotely removed two free apps from several hundred Android phones because the apps misrepresented their purpose and thus violated Android developer policies, according to a company spokesman.
"The apps "were not designed to be used maliciously, and did not have permission to access private data--or system resources" beyond accessing the Internet, Rich Cannings, Android Security Lead, wrote in at http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2010/06/exercising-our-remote-application.html

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Stephen Conroy saved by by sensitive negotiations?

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 4 years ago http://www.crn.com.au/News/217702,ludlam-change-in-comms-ministry-unlikely.aspx
From Communications spokesperson Senator Scott Ludlam "a change in Communications Ministers is "really unlikely".., due to difficulties in handing over the Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy (DBCDE) while significant, sensitive Telstra and NBN Co dealings take place."

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You Don’t Want ISPs to Innovate

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 4 years ago http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2010/06/you-dont-want-isps-to-innovate/
"Building out infrastructure means redirecting stock-dividend dollars and putting them back into the company, which Wall Street punishes companies for â" and which hurts the massive stock packages of telecom executives. Itâ(TM)s literally not in telecom executivesâ(TM) best interest to invest in broadband and solid networks."

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Next WikiLeaks Release May Involve ECHELON

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 4 years ago

http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2010/06/22/2933892.htm
He agreed it would be of the "calibre" of publishing information about the way the top secret Echelon system - the US-UK electronic spying network which eavesdrops on worldwide communications traffic - had been used.

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Australian Greens to host anti-filter forum

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 4 years ago

http://www.itnews.com.au/News/217576,greens-to-host-anti-filter-forum.aspx

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Fears internet costs will rise due to NBN

AHuxley AHuxley writes  |  more than 4 years ago

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/nation/fears-internet-costs-will-rise-due-to-nbn/story-e6frg6nf-1225882485870
"This deal between the NBN and Telstra could make broadband prices much worse for consumers if the NBN Co only decides to lease backhaul from Telstra and leaves the other backhaul providers stranded,"
Great backhaul lock in from one old monopoly to another.

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