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Comments

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Secretive Funding Fuels Ongoing Net Neutrality Astroturfing Controversy

AaronLS Re:The saddest part is..... (54 comments)

Joking aside, the issue here that stands in the way of free market forces prevailing is the overwhelming cost of building the infrastructure required to compete on the same footing as established companies. If we had reasonable alternative ISP's we could vote with our dollars.

The reason telco's managing landlines were regulated so heavily is because they each get a slice of the infrastructure pie to provide their services on. Essentially a government mandated local monopoly, and thus the government dictates how much the telco can charge so that the telco cannot abuse their monopoly. This of course doesn't eliminate abuse nor guarantee that the rates are fair, but instead or the rates that the telco can convince the local officials are fair.

The benefits of this questionable arrangement are clear when you consider that the alternative is each company build its own duplicate infrastructure, which would result in poor under utilization of that infrastructure and result in higher costs passed on to consumers. Essentially this is why some want ISP's treated like utilities.

There are a handful of companies like Google who have the capital to build such infrastructures and bring competition to the table. Even in the presence of a true free market, companies often do not battle by providing competitive pricing, but instead find it more profitable to put money into advertising. If there are only two choices in an area, each will have a fair amount of people who are convinced by the advertising the X is better than Y, and then a fair amount of people who had a bad experience with X and so switched to Y. X and Y both charge way more than what it really costs to provide the service. They don't really have to coordinate price fixing, they simply come to the same conclusion after doing market research of what people are most likely to pay for service. Even if one has a slightly higher price than the other, the large profit margin will make up for the lost customers.

yesterday
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Austin Airport Tracks Cell Phones To Measure Security Line Wait

AaronLS Re:A bit???? (165 comments)

This made me laugh. I imagined the loud mouth guy from Dilbert doing this.

2 days ago
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Austin Airport Tracks Cell Phones To Measure Security Line Wait

AaronLS Re:A bit???? (165 comments)

The manufacturer of your phone already knows your mac address. It has no value to anyone else beyond the first network hop. You like the author are an idiot who knows nothing about MAC addresses.

2 days ago
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Austin Airport Tracks Cell Phones To Measure Security Line Wait

AaronLS Re:What privacy concerns? (165 comments)

Pretty much what I was thinking.

"People everywhere are constantly scanning with their beady little eyes. If they see someone in public they have met before, they recognize them and are able to track them through the crowd with these eyes. The privacy implications of this being used in a place that is not at all private and completely public, are unsettling."

2 days ago
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Two Exocomet Families Found Around Baby Star System

AaronLS Re:Two families one baby? (23 comments)

But there is a system for these famous babies to keep order. The Baby Star System.

2 days ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

AaronLS Re:Society hypocrisy.... (387 comments)

'"Shut up you idiotic shitstained spooge gargler" is a more concise translation of "I am done listening".'

Seven words is not more concise than 4... You also don't understand the distinction between personal attacks and technical criticism. I made no distinction about value systems.

I could have ranted for a paragraph about how stupid you are, but it was more efficient to articulate it. Not only that, but pointing out the facts is more efficient time wise than have a name calling session that won't end in anything productive. Two programmers can go back and forth for an hour insulting each other and come to nothing or spend 30 seconds pointing out the technical merits of one approach or another. Where I work discussions are always civil and we go through design change decisions very quickly. Other places I've worked they suffer from bad decisions because they can't communicate decision rational. It has nothing to do with value systems and everything to do with efficient communication.

" so don't tell me people should be understanding of these things. "
I told you those things.

about a week ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

AaronLS Re:Society hypocrisy.... (387 comments)

You imply that Linus's comments are technical attacks and not personal attacks. Far from the case. He likes to say things like referring to other developers sucking c***. That's a personal attack, not a technical one. Next time a coworker proposes a solution that you think lacks technical merit, tell him he sucks c*** and see how productive that discussion is.

about two weeks ago
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Lockheed Claims Breakthrough On Fusion Energy Project

AaronLS Re:Of course! (566 comments)

"No matter how many billions you spend, you're not going to make a Chevette go faster than the speed of light."

You're comparing something that most would say is theoretically impossible, to something that most agree is theoretically possible and has already been achieved on a very small scale(LLNL ignition, of course not at the efficiency tipping point yet).

"The problems are technical"
The problems facing a mission to the moon were also technical, but with extraordinary funding they were able to fast track it by dividing up all the technical problems they faced and tackling them individually.

Fusion has many technical problems that could be tackled independently in parallel. See "When will fusion power my house (or vehicle)?" in the previously linked article. It covers this pretty extensively.

"You can't point at funding as a problem for fusion."
I can and did. The facts provided in the link are pretty compelling.

"..can't point at funding.... The problems are ... economic."
You contradicted yourself.

"No amount of money will fix that."
You've never heard of this thing called "employment". You have a technical problem, you use money to employ experts in the field that you are having that problem, and they come up with a solution. If that solution requires labor and materials to implement, you then employ some more people.

No or little amount of funding means little meaningful progress. You have some independent researchers working here and there to produce some papers and try to get published, but at some point you've got to coordinate activities and get appropriate amount of effort applied to each technical problem in an organized way:
http://i.imgur.com/sjH5r.jpg

You can't call BS if your only supporting argument is BS.

about two weeks ago
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Lockheed Claims Breakthrough On Fusion Energy Project

AaronLS Re:Of course! (566 comments)

That was if it got if a moderate amount of funding. The problem is its never seen the kind of funding needed to put it on a decent schedule:

http://hardware-beta.slashdot....

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: An Accurate Broadband Speed Test?

AaronLS Re:Really? (294 comments)

Oh I should have proof read that, there is some grammar murdering going on there. You get the idea though.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: An Accurate Broadband Speed Test?

AaronLS Re:Really? (294 comments)

Agreed he should accuse WIFI with no evidence, but at the same time it is not a legitimize test with WIFI in the loop. If he's experience connection issues or measuring performance of his cable connection, then he should do a direct connection to eliminate WIFI since it is very susceptible to many issues that could affect performance. Only then can he point fingers at the cable connection.

about two weeks ago
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Micron Releases 16nm-Process SSDs With Dynamic Flash Programming

AaronLS Re: Lifetime at 16nm? (66 comments)

It may not have to do with cell lifetime, but it does relate to overall endurance. If their "tricks" are legitimate algorithmic approaches to improving endurance, then the native cell lifetime becomes less of a solid metric to endurance. It would be the analogy to when clock speeds of CPUs became less relevant when manufacturers began focusing on increasing pipeline throughput instead of clock speed.

If a decrease from 20nm to 16nm feature size increases density by 25% and only decreases cell lifetime by 10%, then they will have more than enough new capacity to overprovision for the difference, and if their algorithmic improvements are legitimate, then that mitigates the need for additional over provisioning.

There's alot of "if"s in there of course, because you can't always take such PR at face value.

about a month ago
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AT&T Says 10Mbps Is Too Fast For "Broadband," 4Mbps Is Enough

AaronLS Re:Ask anyone still on Dial Up (533 comments)

So if anything 4mbps is 100 * dialup, while car is 10 * foot, so if anything 4mbps is better than a car. It's more like a mach 1 fighter jet.

about a month and a half ago
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AT&T Says 10Mbps Is Too Fast For "Broadband," 4Mbps Is Enough

AaronLS Re:Ask anyone still on Dial Up (533 comments)

Avg. sustained running speed for a person is around 8-10 mph unless your an Olympic athlete. Car ~80 mph highway. So my anology holds as Running * 10 == Car. Just thought I'd add that for the mathematically challenged.

about a month and a half ago
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AT&T Says 10Mbps Is Too Fast For "Broadband," 4Mbps Is Enough

AaronLS Re:Ask anyone still on Dial Up (533 comments)

"but it's still fairly frustrating"

The fact that you want to do more simultaneous "broadband activities" at a time and 4mbps doesn't provide enough bandwidth for this doesn't mean 4mbps != broadband.

You named some things it's good enough for(wikipedia requires about 5% of that bandwidth, so to imply it is just good enough is a kind of rediculous), but you've not given one concrete example of a situation where 4mbps is not enough for typical usage. Unless you're trying to download torrents while streaming 1080p from something like Netflix at the same time, then 4mbps is fine for vast majority of things. If your ISP is giving you the full 4mbps and they haven't over provisioned in your neighborhood(if your on shared bandwidth like cable) then you can have two people watching Netflix at the same time on that connection.

Those are the kinds of activities you can only do on broadband, and the fact that you can do them on 4mbps is what makes it broadband. Unless there is a problem with your connection or your trying to do more than one broadband activity, then something like Netflix should be working just fine.

about a month and a half ago
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AT&T Says 10Mbps Is Too Fast For "Broadband," 4Mbps Is Enough

AaronLS Re:Ask anyone still on Dial Up (533 comments)

4mbps is 100 times faster than 56 kbps. This makes 4mbps the car, and 56kbps being on foot, the bicyle would be ISDN which is about as terrible as dialup.

Math mthrfckr, learn it.

about a month and a half ago
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AT&T Says 10Mbps Is Too Fast For "Broadband," 4Mbps Is Enough

AaronLS Re:Ask anyone still on Dial Up (533 comments)

Your anology is bad. You obviously have never used dialup.
Dialup is like being on foot.
ISDN, which is slightly better than dialup is the bicycle.
4 mbps is the car.
4mbps is 100 times faster than dialup, if not more because where I can usually get the full speed of my broadband connection, I almost never got the full speed of dialup, usually around 33kbps. What took a week to download on dialup takes 1 hour on 4 mbps.

about a month and a half ago
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AT&T Says 10Mbps Is Too Fast For "Broadband," 4Mbps Is Enough

AaronLS Ask anyone still on Dial Up (533 comments)

Give anyone 4 mbps connection who is living in an area that still has dialup as their only option, and ask them if its broadband. If someone works to bring 4/1 mbps connections to more areas, they should be able to advertise it as broadband.

about a month and a half ago
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Scientists Sequence Coffee Genome, Ponder Genetic Modification

AaronLS Re:Le sigh.... (167 comments)

And that's where the anti-GMO nuts fall on their faces. We've eaten hybrid, selectively bred, and grafted plants for decades, and the anti-GMO's eat plenty of this stuff, and there are potential side affects to all of these processes. Just look at pure bred dogs and cats, and all the medical problems many of them have that are an attribute of their breed.

about 1 month ago

Submissions

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Unlimited Food Stamps During System Outage

AaronLS AaronLS writes  |  1 year,11 days

AaronLS (1804210) writes "Electronic Benefits Transfer(EBT) card holders were allowed unlimited spending at some Walmart locations during an outage of the system that is used to determine spending limits. Some people hauling out multiple carts of groceries. According to system operator Xerox, there's an “agreed and documented process for retailers like Walmart to follow in response to EBT outage.” It is not clear whether or not Walmart followed this procedure or not, but Walmart spokesperson stated the decision was made to "contine[SIC] to accept EBT cards during the outage so that they could get food for their families.” Other retailers simply did not allow purchases during the outage. Xerox stated they would work to determine the cause and prevent future outages, but did not specifically state whether they would take steps to prevent unlimited spending during future outages.

Was this unlimited spending a flaw of the system and procedure, an intended procedure, or did Walmart simply not follow appropriate procedure? If Walmart took it upon themselves to allow unauthorized spending during the outage, why did they not at least impose a reasonable limit that would allow a family to get through the next day?

This news has already incited a lot of inflammatory and childish debate across the web from both those who are pro and anti-foodstamps, drowning out any intelligent analysis of the system/procedures that caused this event."
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Disabling Java Recommended In Response to Vulnerability

AaronLS AaronLS writes  |  about 2 years ago

AaronLS writes "US-CERT is recommending that users disable Java in their browsers due to a 0-day vulnerability which US-CERT is "currently unaware of a practical solution". They indicate that the vulnerability is being actively exploited in the wild, and is available in exploit kits."
Link to Original Source
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The HP Memristor Debate

AaronLS AaronLS writes  |  more than 2 years ago

AaronLS writes "(Note: I would have included links and appropriate formatting for quotes within the story, but I have searched and searched and found no guidelines in the FAQ or googling your site that indicate what formatting tags or HTML are valid for stories.)

There has been a debate about whether HP has or has not developed a memristor. It being something fairly different from existing technologies, and similar in many ways to a memristor, I think they felt comfortable using the term. However, there are those not happy about HP using that labeling. On the other hand, had HP created a new unique label, they would have probably gotten flack for pretending it's something new when it's not. What positive will come from the debate? Martin Reynolds sums it up nicely:

“Is Stan Williams being sloppy by calling it a ‘memristor’? Yeah, he is,” Martin Reynolds tells Wired. “Is Blaise Moutett being pedantic in saying it is not a ‘memristor’? Yeah, he is. [...] At the end of day, it doesn’t matter how it works as long as it gives us the ability to build devices with really high density storage.”"

Link to Original Source
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Compromised Steam Data Included Credit Card Info

AaronLS AaronLS writes  |  more than 2 years ago

AaronLS writes "Steam has released additional information about a previous security breach, indicating that with the help of third party security experts they have determined no passwords were compromised, but billing information and credits cards were compromised. This information was encrypted, but no details were given on the level or type of this encryption, which would be significant since the attackers would have free reign to throw as much computing power at trying to decrypt the data, either through brute force guessing of the key or other means if the encryption has weaknesses. Also of significance, would be whether all the data shared the same key, or if each user's billing information was encrypted with a different key."
Link to Original Source
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Flash Density Increasing w/25nm Triple Level Cells

AaronLS AaronLS writes  |  more than 4 years ago

AaronLS (1804210) writes "StorageReview.com has a story indicating Intel and Micron planning production this year for Triple Level Cell flash on 25nm Lithography. This means that 3 bits instead of 2 can be stored in each cell, and the smaller 25nm Lithography generally allows more cells to be fit in the same area.
  This combination should provide a considerable improvement to the density, and hopefully cost, of flash based storage. Read more at StorageReview.com: http://www.storagereview.com/intel_and_micron_announce_25nm_triple_level_cell_nand"

Link to Original Source

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