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Comments

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Scientists Seen As Competent But Not Trusted By Americans

Actually, I do RTFA Re:Fox News? (445 comments)

Most c-sections happen on Friday. Why? They've got to get home for the weekend.

It also gives the parents a whole weekend to recover before the man has to go back to work.

What you need to reinforce your claim is a breakdown of c-sections planned for a Friday in advance, and those that get scheduled *that day* on a Friday.

That said, I agree with the need to question your doctor. But your example sucks.

yesterday
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London's Crime Hot Spots Predicted Using Mobile Phone Data

Actually, I do RTFA Re:Typical statistics (64 comments)

I read "select" as meaning specific fields (as in, select types of data), not deliberately selected subsets of data... got a quote that helps clarify things?

about two weeks ago
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London's Crime Hot Spots Predicted Using Mobile Phone Data

Actually, I do RTFA Re:Typical statistics (64 comments)

In other words, they took everything they gathered and pulled a subset that matched criteria that would back the claim that they could detect future crimes.

While it's possible that they did in fact pull a biased sample, this methodology is what I was taught in academia as a legit way to test machine learning. If you have one sample set, first split it into two. Use one set, usually much smaller, to train the neural network. That data set, because it's tuned to find those specific correlations, obviously produced really good predictions. So you use the second data set to test whether the inputs correctly predict the outputs.

about two weeks ago
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London's Crime Hot Spots Predicted Using Mobile Phone Data

Actually, I do RTFA Re:Price of safety (64 comments)

Especially considering that said "information sharing" leads to a mere 8% increase in accuracy.

Well, closer to 22%. While it's true that 8% of the predictions are more accurate, what is important is that ~22% of the predictions that used to be wrong are no longer. In much the same way as if it went to 100% accurate, you don't get to bitch about it being only a 38% increase in accuracy. You get to talk about whether it's worth the cost, and how we can get something only 62% as accurate without the cost.

about two weeks ago
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Microsoft Paid NFL $400 Million To Use Surface, But Announcers Call Them iPads

Actually, I do RTFA Re:Kleenex, Xerox, iPad.... (405 comments)

This is one of the reasons why it's going to be such an uphill battle for Microsoft when it comes to tablets and phones. They were late to the game.

They really weren't. I remember using a Windows tablet/laptop convertable back in 199? And a Windows phone (with Office, etc. ) before the first iPhone dropped.

I'm actually not sure why neither one took off. My assumption would be that both were too large, and that probably had most to do with either non-low-power chips or battery technology.

about three weeks ago
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Tesla Plans To Power Its Gigafactory With Renewables Alone

Actually, I do RTFA Re:ironic (260 comments)

because of the hoover dam.

Which is all green energy, so it's easy for Tesla to live up to their claims.

about three weeks ago
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Is There a Creativity Deficit In Science?

Actually, I do RTFA Re:Is there a science deficit in creativity? (203 comments)

The same formula is used by Hollywood when someone messes with the occult. The dire, yet vindicated, warning. The monster in the second act. Etc.

I guess what I'm saying is that Hollywood honestly doesn't know the difference between science and magic. Although computers even more so.

I'm far more concerned about the effect of "cops bend the rules because they sooo hate the evil killer and need to get him off the streets" shows. Cops actually do get influenced by that. I think there was a study about that, but it may have been not published because it was too groundbreaking....

about three weeks ago
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Is There a Creativity Deficit In Science?

Actually, I do RTFA Re:Who bears the risk? (203 comments)

Risky to who, exactly?

The research bearing fruit. No one is suggesting removing protections from actual subjects. The article is about funders wanting to fund "successful" (that is, hypothesis affirming) and "publishable" (that is, less contraversial) experiments.

His goal is to somehow shift the funder's incentives so high sucessful completion risk/high reward (either in basic knowledge or specific benefit) stuff gets made.

And I agree. The shit that gets funded at any real level is often piecemeal and uninteresting. Hell, even "we want money to try a similar study with N>35 so we can test a lot of spin off research of this promising study" get shot down for being too out there.%lt;/rant>

about three weeks ago
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Combating Recent, Ugly Incidents of Misogyny In Gamer Culture

Actually, I do RTFA Re:One bad apple spoils the barrel (1134 comments)

there is no incentive to solve the misogynistic trolling "problem" (assuming it even exists

Well, that depends on who is solving the problem. Certainly, some games do in fact see a drop in subscriber base. These companies have incentive to stop the problem.

For instance, XBox saw a lot of women not re-upping their XBox Gold accounts.

about a month ago
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Apple Denies Systems Breach In Photo Leak

Actually, I do RTFA Re:At the risk of blaming the victim... (311 comments)

In this case they did lock the gate, I assume. By which you mean use passwords.

However, that doesn't help if the gate is set in a 4 foot high picket fence

about a month ago
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Combating Recent, Ugly Incidents of Misogyny In Gamer Culture

Actually, I do RTFA Re:Nobody has the right not to be offended. (1134 comments)

There's no such thing as a right not to be offended

There certainlly is, within some contexts. There is a right not to be offended in your home. There is a right to limit what asshats say on your blog.

Now, that doesn't give you the right to shut down channels where people say what you don't like, unless that channel is too difficult to avoid. Protests in front of your house. Calls at 2am. Etc. But free speech does not give you a right to force yourself to be heard.

about a month ago
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Apple Denies Systems Breach In Photo Leak

Actually, I do RTFA Re:At the risk of blaming the victim... (311 comments)

Youâ(TM)ll note the celebs arenâ(TM)t in the above list of people who share in the blame here. I donâ(TM)t even expect them to know enough to use good passwords. Theyâ(TM)re ordinary humans whose focus should be on things not related to IT security.

I expect them to know enough to use good passwords, because I expect all people to know that. I expect them to know enough that they are a high-profile target. And I expect them to know enough to know that computer security is often shittily done.

That is, I expect them to know enough not to trust anything. I don't expect them to know enough to choose to trust anything.

about a month ago
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Apple Denies Systems Breach In Photo Leak

Actually, I do RTFA Re:At the risk of blaming the victim... (311 comments)

Wrong-think.

If the fucking system worked like it's supposed to, people could put anything anywhere. Blaming the victim for a broken system is not logical.

It is if the victim, exercising a reasonable amount of care, would have known the system was broken. Now, what is reasonable is up for debate. I think everyone agrees if you ignore the "Beware of the Leopard" sign that everyone agrees you don't get to complain when you don't get a super-awesome adventure (possibly also mauled by a leopard). And I think if the breaks in your Prius go bad, then no one would think you could have predicted that (unless you are the Woz; because he did and told Toyota...)

I would say that it is perfectly reasonable to blame the victim for not realizing that nothing you put on the internet can ever hope to be private. If you are leader of a country, you should expect other countries to tap your phones. If you are a celebrity who makes a lot of money off your sexiness, you should expect people will want nude pictures of you.

You may disagree. And it is distasteful to blame the victim. But there is some point, which different people can have a discussion about, when it is starts becoming their fault.

about a month ago
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In Maryland, a Soviet-Style Punishment For a Novelist

Actually, I do RTFA Re:More to the story? (441 comments)

Is it that journalism doesn't exist, or that you just don't know how to use google?

If you can easily Google more information about a topic than the journalists put in their articles, does that really support the contention that journalism exists?

about a month ago
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Should police have cameras recording their work at all times?

Actually, I do RTFA Re:"Accidentally" (455 comments)

Why? It doesn't happen now.

We fucking make it happen. We pass a law that says that says that they cannot. And that the defense can bring it up if they do.

Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, you'll notice that there is not footage of the alleged stop. That's because, after we requested the footage, Officer McPoopyPants deleted it. Does that sound like the behavior of an officer who legitimately gave my client a ticket for going 1 mph over the limit?

about a month ago
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Apple Reveals the Most Common Reasons That It Rejects Apps

Actually, I do RTFA Re:ui consistency is very important. (132 comments)

You mean something like this?

No, I think he means something that is actually followed... and possibly enforced.

As a rule, if you say "but there is a standard; let me link to the documentation" there isn't a standard.

about a month ago
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In Maryland, a Soviet-Style Punishment For a Novelist

Actually, I do RTFA Re:I guess you should just write about... (441 comments)

. They don't lock you up for making up stories about rainbows.

<sarcasm>Maybe not in California. But in my state, we don't let pervs try to force children to be soldiers in the gay alliance.</sarcasm>

about a month ago
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In Maryland, a Soviet-Style Punishment For a Novelist

Actually, I do RTFA Re:Do Everything Wrong Day (441 comments)

the real guns/ammo

I'm pretty sure the GP meant "Guns and Ammo", the magazine. Since it was capitalized like the title and followed "Mad Magazine." But I agree that your punishment fits the crime of daring to bring a toy to school

about a month ago
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U.S. Senator: All Cops Should Wear Cameras

Actually, I do RTFA Re:Federal vs. local decision (Re:I like...) (643 comments)

I am worried about the yet another illustration of how the Federal government's control reaches into the crooks and nannies it was never supposed to reach.

But that's just an appeal to authority. I will grant, for the sake of argument, that it is working around the intent of the 10th amendment. I just don't see why I should care. I mean, the 10th amendment made sense when slavery was an sometimes (someplaces) thing; when it took forever to cross a state boundary, and the idea of traversing three states in the course of commuting would be a fanciful idea.

On a second point, I'd further content that cameras on cops are a rights issue - and are fully under the purview of the feds under Amendment 14

about a month ago

Submissions

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Why would you teach your kid to brush his teeth - there's an app for that.

Actually, I do RTFA Actually, I do RTFA writes  |  about 4 months ago

Actually, I do RTFA (1058596) writes "

Have you ever tried to teach your kid the "Bass-Stillman" brushing technique — the technique that dental professionals would try to teach your child if they thought he could handle it?

That's the question asked by Brush Up, a new mobile game with a bluetooth-enabled toothbrush. They purport to be able to train your child to brush his own teeth. They seem to back it up, as they used NIH (National Institute of Health) money to run a year long study.

Interestingly, they hired a developmental psychologist, because apparently you brain handles brushing your teeth differently when you are younger.

Their website has some information, but they seem to have put a lot more effort into their Kickstarter page.

Would you trust your child to bring a tablet/phone into the bathroom as they brush? Do you think you can teach better than a game? Or will parents not ask themselves any of those questions, and just buy it to get their kid to brush his teeth without a fight?"

Link to Original Source

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Fluke Donates Real Multimeters to SparkFun as goodwill gesture

Actually, I do RTFA Actually, I do RTFA writes  |  about 6 months ago

Actually, I do RTFA (1058596) writes "We recently heard about the confiscation of a delivery of multimeters to SparkFun for infringing on Fluke's trademark. One common thread in the discussions was the theme that Fluke should have let that shipment through ("lawyers" argued about the legal ramifications of it) as a goodwill gesture to SparkFun and the Maker community. Well, Fluke did one better. They announced they were sending more than $30k worth of official multimeters to SparkFun for them to do whatever they want with.

SparkFun is most likely going to give them away.

A great example of win-win-win?"

Link to Original Source
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Microsoft loses final appeal in EU Antitrust case.

Actually, I do RTFA Actually, I do RTFA writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Actually, I do RTFA (1058596) writes "Being a convicted monopolist in Europe may be not as sweet a deal as in the United States. Microsoft has been forced to allow blanket licences to its server protocols[Free registration required]. Although they will still be raking in the money (at 10,000 euro upfront and 0.4% in royalties), it seems paltry compared to the almost 6% royalty rate they used to insist upon. And Microsoft has already paid 1 billion euros ( $1.43 billion US ) for the privledge of appealing to this stage, with a possibility that they will owe another 1.6 billion euros more.

Since they are having such a bad day, I thought I might as well advertise where you can purchase access to their proprietary code to make up for it. Curiously enough though, that site is down."
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Our ATM is broken, so you go to jail?

Actually, I do RTFA Actually, I do RTFA writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Actually, I do RTFA (1058596) writes "A short while ago, slashdot featured an article about possible criminal prosecution for people who took advantage of faulty slot machine software. At the time, many people drew an analogy to an ATM that dispensed too much money. Well, apparently, that too may result in criminal charges. Interestingly, although they suspect that someone may have tampered with the ATM, they are considering charging anyone who withdrew money from the ATM.

This also provides an interesting rejoinder to 'if they can build a secure ATM, why cannot Diebold build a secure electronic voting machine.'"

Link to Original Source

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