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Fedora 21 Released

AdamWill Re:What if I want to KickStart a Desktop machine? (106 comments)

"What if I want to KickStart a Desktop machine and don't want it to be a live image?"

Use Server. The Server network install image is the canonical thing to use for non-live installs of any kind, basically use it just as you'd use the netinst.iso in previous releases.

We're aware this sounds a bit weird, sorry about that. I can give you the *extremely* long version if you like, but the short version is that when it came to actually *implementing* the Product stuff there were the kinds of 'oh, so that doesn't quite work the way we thought it would' moments you'd expect in making such a significant change to an existing distro with existing release engineering tooling.

The upshot of one of them was that having Product-ish network install images turned out to be basically impossible to do, and after a while of banging our heads on trying to fix it we figured, you know what, we don't really need them anyway. Given how the practical implementation of the Products turned out for F21 at least, we can just have a single network install that can deploy anything, just like we did before.

Unfortunately by that point it wasn't really practical to try and set up some kind of new/old tree to build it out of and give it generic branding, so the story for F21 is: for anything like that, use Server. Use the 'Server' network install image for doing any kind of non-live deployment - the only 'Server' things about it are the visual branding and the fact that it *defaults* to the Server package set, but you can successfully deploy any Product or non-Product package set from it, it's functionally little different from the F20 generic network install image.

The Server/ tree on the mirrors is also the canonical source of things like the PXE boot kernel/initramfs, and the fedup upgrade initramfs.

Again, this obviously isn't optimal design, it's just kinda how things worked out in the F21 timeframe (there are some really boring release engineering considerations behind it all that I can explain if you're having trouble sleeping). For F22, all being well, it'll be cleaned up.

The 'Fedora' DVD wasn't actually an 'Everything' DVD, for the record. The repo tree called Everything has literally every package in it but is not 'composed', i.e. it doesn't have installer images and we can't build release media out of it. It still exists for F21. The Fedora repo tree in previous releases (it doesn't exist in F21) was what the DVD and netinst images were built out of. It didn't contain all packages, it contained the set of packages that was chosen to go on the DVD media - substantially fewer than are in the Everything tree.

The 'Fedora' generic DVD image was dropped as part of the whole Product-ization approach, basically the idea being there's a Product image or live spin for most use cases, and install via the Server netinst covers other cases. The specific case of 'I want to do an offline install with a custom package set that's covered by the old Fedora DVD package set but not the new Server DVD package set' is lost with this change, yep, we're sorry about that - ultimately to make a significant change like Products *something* had to be lost, and that's one of the things that was. The Fedora/ tree in the repos doesn't exist any more because its purpose was to build the Fedora DVD image.

about two weeks ago
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Fedora 21 Released

AdamWill Re:More Dependencies! (106 comments)

Lennart doesn't have anything to do with firewalld, FWIW.

about two weeks ago
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Fedora 21 Released

AdamWill Re:Fedora 20 upgrade comments (106 comments)

Choosing the Server product on upgrade will install the Server packages, including its firewall configuration and Cockpit, because...that's Server. If you just want to keep the existing packages you have installed, choose 'nonproduct'. You can remove Cockpit if you don't want it.

about two weeks ago
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Fedora 21 Released

AdamWill Re:About the Spins (106 comments)

Correct, it's not considered to be one of the Products. It's just Fedora.

about two weeks ago
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Fedora 21 Released

AdamWill Re:Where is the Cinnamon desktop? (106 comments)

There isn't one, the Cinnamon maintainer doesn't want to make one, for some reason. You can install from the 'Server' netinst and choose the Cinnamon package set, though, that'll work fine.

about two weeks ago
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Fedora 21 Released

AdamWill Re:does grub2-probe work out of the box? (106 comments)

"This means it wont find and grubify existing OS installs, including windows. "

No, it doesn't. We test that. It works fine. It uses os-prober, see /etc/grub.d/30_os-prober .

about two weeks ago
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Fedora 21 Released

AdamWill Re:It has systemd? (106 comments)

Fedora Release Day Drinking Game: At least two idiotic comments about systemd in the first five on /.? Take a shot.

about two weeks ago
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Fedora 21 Beta Released

AdamWill About time (56 comments)

A Fedora community member releases periodic respins of Fedora stable releases; they're not official releases and they don't go through QA but FWIW I'd trust the guy if I needed a respun image in a pinch. http://jbwillia.wordpress.com/ is his site, you can find the spins at https://alt.fedoraproject.org/... .

about a month and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Can You Say Something Nice About Systemd?

AdamWill Re:It freakin' works fine (928 comments)

well, ultimately the init system launches *everything* if you take a broad enough view of things, but that doesn't mean the init system is somehow responsible for your desktop environment's display configuration.

I mean, if you're really determined to, you can 'configure' things by modifying their init scripts, sure, but it's usually not the right way to do it. X has a perfectly good configuration system already. So does GNOME. If you want to change the DPI at one or other of those levels, go configure it through their configuration systems. That's how it's supposed to work.

about a month and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Can You Say Something Nice About Systemd?

AdamWill Re:Parallel booting (928 comments)

That's far too reductionist. For a start, there are many sysv-compatible init implementations that do parallel boot; upstart does it, Mandriva's pinit does it. There's a whole subset of LSB that exists exclusively to provide a way for sysv initscripts to represent dependencies *precisely in order to enable parallel init* - see https://wiki.debian.org/LSBIni... for a good write-up of that.

Secondly, insofar as systemd is intended to improve boot speeds, it wasn't actually just about implementing simple parallelization of sysv-style services using dependencies. If you read http://0pointer.de/blog/projec... it talks a lot about parallelization but it's actually talking about making *more* parallelization possible, not just *implementing* parallelization: the big idea Lennart had back then was the idea that you don't actually have to completely start up a service in order to start up another service that 'requires' it, if you can create the socket it listens on before it's ready, then queue up any requests and pass them on to the service once it's actually done starting up. Lennart was clearly really excited about this idea at the time, but if you look at systemd these days, it's a really pretty small corner of all the things it does.

All the way through the first part of that first post, Lennart is really talking about making more parallelization possible, he's not simply talking about implementing inter-service dependencies.

These days systemd does an awful lot more, and it really isn't just about making boot faster any more. Even in the very first post, once you get past the first half, it starts talking about improved capabilities. I find startup speed the least interesting thing about systemd, really, I'm much more interested in the improved capabilities for units and especially in the improved logging journald provides.

about a month and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Can You Say Something Nice About Systemd?

AdamWill Re:Why dislike something you know nothing about? (928 comments)

"Since RedHat's obviously the largest major proponent"

For the record, there's absolutely nothing 'obvious' about that. People tend to assume that since Lennart was @redhat.com when he wrote systemd it's 'obviously' a Red Hat project, but it really isn't, and never was. It's a Lennart project: he came up with the idea and he wrote it. Red Hat didn't ask for it, didn't actually have any idea it was coming.

The very first instance of all these battles that get fought every six weeks in some distro or on /. or on Phoronix happened in Fedora, when Lennart first proposed switching to systemd. Around the same time / a bit later, all the same battles happened within Red Hat. Just as with every other distro, systemd's proponents brought the idea and argued for it. systemd wasn't planned from the top down by 'Red Hat authorities' as 'our new init system', Lennart came up with it on his own, and convinced the plurality of significant folks/bodies within Fedora and RHEL that it was a good idea.

about a month and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Can You Say Something Nice About Systemd?

AdamWill Re:It freakin' works fine (928 comments)

Um. What? Display DPI is nothing the system init daemon cares about and never *has* been.

It can be set at the X level or at the desktop environment level. Some desktops respect X's setting, some ignore it.

In GNOME you can set both text scaling and full display scaling (the new thing used for hi-dpi screens) in GNOME Tweak Tool. Text scaling is in Fonts, it's the 'Scaling Factor' - if you think about things in DPI terms, just consider the 'scaling factor' to be a multiple of 96, e.g. if you want to set 110 DPI, set it to 1.14.

If you mean GNOME's decided your display is hidpi and starting scaling *everything*, that's the 'Window scaling' setting on the Windows tab, set it to 1 (which is no scaling).

Again, none of this has the slightest thing to do with init.

about a month and a half ago
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Ex-CBS Reporter Claims Government Agency Bugged Her Computer

AdamWill Re:She's.. (235 comments)

The article continues:

"It was described to me by the computer experts I consulted with afterwards that that was purely an attempt to let me know that they could do that, that they were watching, that they were in my computer."

Not saying that interpretation is correct, but it does seem reasonable to point out that she does in fact have a response to your objection.

about 2 months ago
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Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

AdamWill Re:at some point it isnt linux anymore. (774 comments)

There's no abuse there. He doesn't say a thing about the presenter personally, just corrects stuff that's in his slide, then says that sometimes what's written on web pages isn't true. Which bit of that did you think was abusive?

about 2 months ago
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Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

AdamWill Re:Please stop this madness! (774 comments)

It's been running under 'real-world conditions' for years already - do you think no-one runs real-world systems on Fedora, or that Red Hat doesn't run releases in production internally before they go out, or that RH has no customers who test pre-releases?

"Seems to me that's the largest reason it's being pushed"

Nope. I think this impression originally came from Lennart's original post on systemd, years and years ago - http://0pointer.de/blog/projec... - because it starts out talking about boot speed. But even that very first post moves on, in the sections "Keeping Track of Processes" and later, to talk about the really interesting bits of systemd - better service management, and more capable service configuration. As systemd development continued, it's become much more about the latter and much less about boot times - I think that's where Lennart *started* thinking about systemd, but it's really not what systemd is for any more. Red Hat certainly wasn't interested in systemd because it might make servers boot three seconds faster, RH was interested because it can make service management on servers much better.

about 2 months ago
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Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

AdamWill Re:Slashdot Response (774 comments)

"anyone sane have to scream NOOOO upon learning it will be Lennart doing the implementation."

Except he isn't. /. is just assuming he is, because they don't understand that more than one person works on systemd.

about 2 months ago
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Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

AdamWill Re:Slashdot Response (774 comments)

Because the people doing the damn work to fix it decided systemd was the sensible place to do it. If you'd rather it be somewhere else, why not write it somewhere else?

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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Final Fedora 15 GNOME 3.0 Test Day this Thursday

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 3 years ago

AdamWill writes "Over the last few months, the Fedora project has run a series of test events for the major new GNOME 3 release. The third and final GNOME 3 Test Day is coming up this Thursday, 2011-04-21. Now the final GNOME 3.0 release has been made, this event will focus on testing its integration into the upcoming Fedora 15 release and exposing any remaining bugs that can be fixed with minor updates. This is a great opportunity to test out the final GNOME 3.0 code on a late pre-release Fedora 15 base, and help the Fedora and GNOME teams to produce a great release. There will be live images available to make sure you can test easily and without the need for a permanent installation — there's no need to be a Fedora user to help out. There are comprehensive testing instructions on the Wiki page, and assistance from the Fedora QA and desktop teams in #fedora-test-day on Freenode IRC throughout the day (WebIRC link for those without an IRC client)."
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Fedora GNOME 3 Test Day #1 coming tomorrow

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 3 years ago

AdamWill (604569) writes "The first of three Fedora project GNOME 3 Test Days is taking place tomorrow (Thursday 2011-02-03) in #fedora-test-day on Freenode IRC. Join others and the GNOME development team to test out GNOME 3 and help make sure it's stable and polished! The testing is easy, can be done from a live image so there's no need to have Fedora installed or to be a Fedora user, and you can help out with just ten minutes of your time. This blog post has more details on the event and how you can get involved."
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Fedora presents...Graphics Test Week this week

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 4 years ago

AdamWill (604569) writes "The Fedora project announces that this week is Graphics Test Week. Tuesday April 13th is NVIDIA Test Day, Wednesday April 14th is ATI/AMD Test Day, and Thursday April 15th is Intel graphics Test Day. Even if you're not a Fedora user, you can help Linux as a whole by contributing your test results. The testing can be done using a live image, so there's no need to install Fedora onto your system to contribute to the testing: just download a live image, write it to a CD or USB stick, boot it, and run through the tests. Comprehensive test instructions are available on the Wiki pages, and you enter your results into a table on the Wiki page; there's no need to have a Fedora wiki account to do this. QA team members and developers will be available on the IRC channels throughout each event to help with testing and triage, and to work on some of the problems immediately. If you have time, please check out the Wiki pages and join the IRC channel — #fedora-test-day on the Freenode network — to help out! You can use WebIRC if you're not a regular IRC user — just click that link and you're in the chat."
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Fedora 13 Alpha released

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 4 years ago

AdamWill (604569) writes "The first pre-release of Fedora 13, Fedora 13 Alpha, has been announced and is available here. As always, a new Fedora brings a bundle of new features, including available experimental open source 3D acceleration support for NVIDIA graphics adapters, automatic printer driver installation, easy color management on the GNOME desktop, a bundle of improvements to NetworkManager and more. Known issues are here."
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Fedora 12's package installation policy tightened

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 5 years ago

AdamWill (604569) writes "In response to Slashdot's earlier story about Fedora 12's controversial package installation authentication policy, the package maintainers have agreed that the controversial policy will be tightened to require root authentication for trusted package installation. Please see the official announcement and the development mailing list post for more details."
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Fedora 12 released

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 5 years ago

AdamWill (604569) writes "The Fedora Project is pleased to announce the release of Fedora 12 today. With all the latest open source software and major improvements to graphics support, networking, virtualization and more, Fedora 12 is one of the most exciting releases so far. You can download it here. There's a one-page guide to the new release for those in a hurry. The full release announcement has details on the major features, and the release notes contain comprehensive information on changes in this new release. Known issues are documented on the common bugs page."
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Fedora 12 Beta released

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 5 years ago

AdamWill (604569) writes "The Fedora project has announced the release of Fedora 12 Beta, which is available here. This will be the final pre-release before the final release in November. New features of Fedora 12 highlighted in the announcement include substantial improvements and fixes to the major graphics drivers, including experimental 3D acceleration support for AMD Radeon r600+-based adapters; improved mobile broadband support and new Bluetooth PAN tethering support in NetworkManager; improved performance in the 32-bit releases; significant fixes and improvements to audio support, including easy Bluetooth audio support; initial implementation of completely open source Broadcom wireless networking via the openfwwf project; significant improvements to the Fedora virtualization stack; and easy access to the Moblin desktop environment and a preview of the new GNOME Shell interface for GNOME. Further details on the major new features of Fedora 12 can be found in the release announcement and feature list. Known issues are documented in the common bugs page."
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Intel's Poulsbo Driver A Bloody Mess?

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 5 years ago

AdamWill writes "Phoronix writes about the mess that is the Linux support situation for Intel's new graphics chipset, the GMA 500 — aka Poulsbo. They refer to my own post on the topic near the end. Intel has a reputation as one of the most clued-up open source-friendly hardware companies, but if they can't sort out the mess surrounding the driver for this chipset — which is already used on the Dell Mini 12 and Sony Vaio P, and will be used on many future Intel-based systems — that reputation will take a serious hit."
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One Laptop Per Hacker program offers reduced-price

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 5 years ago

AdamWill writes "Emtec, the company behind the Gdium netbook, is launching the One Laptop Per Hacker program. Interested developers can apply to get a pre-release Gdium system at a reduced price of 250. Taking advantage of the Gdium's unique system of storing the operating system on a removable and interchangeable USB key, each system provided in the program will come with two G-Keys, containing different versions of the Mandriva Linux-powered operating system — one contains the standard version, and one a complete development environment. Interested developers are invited to register for the program, providing a description of what they would like to develop for the system."
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Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring Alpha 1 released

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 5 years ago

AdamWill writes "The first pre-release of Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring is now available. This alpha concentrates on updating to the major desktop components of the distribution, including KDE 4.2 Beta 2, GNOME 2.25.2, Xfce 4.6 Beta 2, X.org server 1.5, and kernel 2.6.28 rc8. It is also the first distribution to introduce the major new Tcl/Tk release, 8.6. The alpha is available only in the DVD Free edition with a traditional installer and no proprietary applications; future pre-releases will add the live CD One edition with proprietary drivers. Please help test this first pre-release and report bugs to Mandriva."
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A sad/happy tale of Mandriva decline/growth

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  about 6 years ago

AdamWill writes "Controversy in the Mandriva world this afternoon. Vincent Danen is all doom and gloom, citing declining numbers of posts to mailing lists as evidence of a shrinking community. However, Javier Villacampa points out in the comments that the community is spreading out to different places, and Adam Williamson responds to Vincent, citing fast-growing numbers of users and posts on the official forums."
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Mandriva Linux 2009 released

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Adam Williamson writes "(NOTE: I'm sorry if this is a dupe, but it's not showing up in my list of submissions as pending or rejected, it's just not there at all, and it's an important story, so I wanted to make sure you get it).

Mandriva has today released Mandriva Linux 2009, the new major release of the popular distribution. 2009 is a bold release which brings the new KDE 4 as the default desktop, along with a re-designed installer and Mandriva Control Center and many other new features. Other significant updates include GNOME 2.24, OpenOffice.org 3, Mozilla Firefox 3, and kernel 2.6.27. Key features include new graphical in-line upgrade capability, netbook compatibility, class-leading hardware support, and further improved support for working with mobile devices. For more details, see the Release Tour and the Release Notes. Get it at the download page, or go straight to the torrent list."

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Mandriva Linux 2009 RC2 released

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 6 years ago

AdamWill writes "Mandriva has today released Mandriva Linux 2009 RC2, the last pre-release before the final release. 2009 is a significant release, featuring KDE 4.1.1 as the default desktop, GNOME 2.24, Firefox 3, OpenOffice.org 3, kernel 2.6.27 and many more significant updates. It also comes with a redesigned installer and Mandriva Control Center. Significant changes in RC2 since RC1 include improved boot speed, support for LUKS encryption of partitions in the Mandriva tools, and some important improvements to hardware support. Download locations are in the link."
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Reimagining The Desktop: a discussion of KDE 4

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 6 years ago

AdamWill writes "Here is an interesting discussion of the changes KDE 4 brings to desktop interaction. It's a very comprehensive and thoughtful discussion and explanation of the new features KDE 4 introduces and what they mean for how you interact with your desktop. If you're not sure how to go about using KDE 4 to its full potential, read it!"
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Mandriva joins the netbook market with the GDium

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 6 years ago

AdamWill writes "Lately it's hard to avoid the buzz about netbooks — the small, cheap laptop systems that were popularized by the Asus Eee PC. Mandriva is providing the innovative operating system for the upcoming GDium netbook system, produced by Emtec. The first GDium will be a netbook with a 10", 1024x600 resolution display and a battery life of four hours, weighing in at 1.1kg. The innovative G-Key system stores the Mandriva operating system and all the user data on a USB key — nothing is permanently stored inside the GDium. You can use your own desktop and data by plugging the G-Key into any GDium."
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Mandriva Linux 2009 Alpha 2 released

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 6 years ago

AdamWill writes "Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring Alpha 2 is released today, marking the first public pre-release of the upcoming Mandriva Linux 2009. This alpha introduces several significant changes, most obviously the inclusion of KDE 4 — 4.1 beta 2, specifically — as the default version of KDE, and the latest development version of GNOME, 2.23.4. The kernel has also been updated to release 2.6.26rc7. Another feature of interest to many users will be the addition of orphan package tracking (and optional automatic removal) to the urpmi package manager. Of course, many applications have been updated (although the default version of Mozilla Firefox is still currently 2.0.x), and most of the distribution has been rebuilt with a new GCC version, 4.3. Please make sure to read the Errata and Release Notes, and file any bugs not covered in those pages on Bugzilla. Mandriva warns that this is a true alpha, likely to contain many bugs related to the new version of KDE. Please install it only in a test environment, and especially do not use it as an upgrade from any earlier Mandriva Linux release."
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Mandriva Linux 2009 plans announced

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 6 years ago

AdamWill writes "Mandriva has released the planned schedule and technical specifications for its next release, Mandriva Linux 2009. These can be found on the Mandriva Wiki. The schedule calls for a first alpha release on June 25th, with the final release set for early October. Planned features include KDE 4, Firefox 3, OpenOffice.org 3, a new design for the installer, a live distribution upgrade mode for MandrivaUpdate, and improvements to many of the Mandriva tools. Take a look and see what you may find on your system when the final Mandriva Linux 2009 release is available."
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Mandriva Flash 2008 Spring released

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 6 years ago

AdamWill writes "Mandriva today announces the release of Mandriva Flash 2008 Spring, the new release of its popular bootable distribution on a USB key. This new version uses the new Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring as its base, doubles the key's capacity to 8GB, introduces a new installer which allows you to install Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring to the system's hard disk, and comes in an attractive new white color scheme. It's available now from the Mandriva Store for 59 or US$69."
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