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Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

AdamWill Re:at some point it isnt linux anymore. (774 comments)

There's no abuse there. He doesn't say a thing about the presenter personally, just corrects stuff that's in his slide, then says that sometimes what's written on web pages isn't true. Which bit of that did you think was abusive?

about two weeks ago
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Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

AdamWill Re:Please stop this madness! (774 comments)

It's been running under 'real-world conditions' for years already - do you think no-one runs real-world systems on Fedora, or that Red Hat doesn't run releases in production internally before they go out, or that RH has no customers who test pre-releases?

"Seems to me that's the largest reason it's being pushed"

Nope. I think this impression originally came from Lennart's original post on systemd, years and years ago - http://0pointer.de/blog/projec... - because it starts out talking about boot speed. But even that very first post moves on, in the sections "Keeping Track of Processes" and later, to talk about the really interesting bits of systemd - better service management, and more capable service configuration. As systemd development continued, it's become much more about the latter and much less about boot times - I think that's where Lennart *started* thinking about systemd, but it's really not what systemd is for any more. Red Hat certainly wasn't interested in systemd because it might make servers boot three seconds faster, RH was interested because it can make service management on servers much better.

about two weeks ago
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Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

AdamWill Re:Slashdot Response (774 comments)

"anyone sane have to scream NOOOO upon learning it will be Lennart doing the implementation."

Except he isn't. /. is just assuming he is, because they don't understand that more than one person works on systemd.

about two weeks ago
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Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

AdamWill Re:Slashdot Response (774 comments)

Because the people doing the damn work to fix it decided systemd was the sensible place to do it. If you'd rather it be somewhere else, why not write it somewhere else?

about two weeks ago
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Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

AdamWill Re:Seriously considering leaving Linux for good. (774 comments)

"The only things I use Linux for anymore is for my personal file server in my basement, and even that is running old Fedora 17."

so...it's running a rather early version of systemd, and apparently working fine, because you haven't seen a need to upgrade it?

about two weeks ago
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Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

AdamWill Re:Why do people care so much? (774 comments)

"Oh hey, just what I wanted BINARY LOGS THAT BREAK ALL MY EXISTING AUTOMATION."

systemd is designed to make it trivially simple to have text logs if you want that. RHEL 7 is configured by default to do permanent logging in plain text format via rsyslog; the native journald logs aren't even permanently stored by default (this is the config that was in Fedora for a while before journald's native format became the default/primary).

https://access.redhat.com/docu...

I am starting to suspect you're a troll and haven't actually used RHEL 7 at all.

about two weeks ago
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Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

AdamWill Re:Why do people care so much? (774 comments)

"Systemd by design tries to mount nfs shares, before it even starts up the network, out of the box!"

Um. No it doesn't. Who told you that?

"Systemd supresses everything unless you tell it to."

No it doesn't. Who told you that?

about two weeks ago
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Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

AdamWill Re:Why do people care so much? (774 comments)

um. what? people have been updating sytems that use systemd for, what, four years now? amazingly enough, it actually works, we don't just all watch our systems crash and reboot every time.

about two weeks ago
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Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

AdamWill Re:Why do people care so much? (774 comments)

"It does its own logging in binary which needs a tool to read the logs and if it gets corrupted then systemd's devs say "just delete the logs". Really?"

Er...no. They don't say that. journalctl reads as much data as it can from corrupted log files and otherwise routes around them. I don't know of any advice that says to delete them.

journald is also intentionaly designed to make it simple to store logs in plain text format if desired, using rsyslog or something similar as a journal consumer. you can do this alongside or instead of systemd's native log format.

about two weeks ago
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Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

AdamWill Re:it solves some unicode issues (774 comments)

Doomed to be buried in /. hysteria, but just for the record: Lennart is not writing this. David Hermann is. systemd is not a one-person project.

about two weeks ago
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Fedora To Get a New Partition Manager

AdamWill Re:Fedora's Partitioning UI (170 comments)

If you look at a screenshot of blivet-gui, you'll see it doesn't use the same UI as anaconda.

about a month and a half ago
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Fedora To Get a New Partition Manager

AdamWill This is rumour control, here are the facts (170 comments)

Unfortunately, Mukt completely mis-reported this and Slashdot picked up their errors for the summary, which is making for a lot of confusion.

tl;dr:

1. blivet-gui isn't supposed to (and in fact cannot) 'replace' gparted in any reasonable sense of that term.
2. blivet-gui is a new application, but its backend is the Fedora installer's storage management code, which is a very old codebase. There is no new storage management backend being written here.
3. Lennart and systemd have nothing at all to do with this.
4. It wouldn't really be practical to 'contribute' this to gparted, as it would involve completely ripping and replacing gparted's backend and then very rapidly proposing significant changes to the GUI, and hence would be a project takeover by any other name.
5. blivet uses standard underlying tools for performing operations, it's just a logic/configuration layer for them.

1: what the original announcement says is that blivet-gui uses a gparted-like UI to make it instantly familiar for gparted users. It doesn't say anything at all about it 'replacing' gparted. That's a pure invention (likely based on a misunderstanding) in the Mukt article. See the original announcement at https://lists.fedoraproject.or... to verify this, if you like. There's no sense in which blivet-gui really *could* "replace" gparted, if you think about it. gparted is an independent project; Red Hat doesn't own or maintain it, so Red Hat can't stop it existing or being maintained. gparted isn't a significant component for either RHEL or Fedora: it's just a leaf package, an app like any other. It's not like anaconda uses gparted as its partitioning tool, or anything like that. So talking about blivet-gui 'replacing' gparted doesn't make any sense, not upstream, not downstream. So long as upstream gparted devs see a need to keep developing gparted, gparted will continue to exist upstream, and so long as a Fedora packager wants gparted to be in Fedora, it'll be in Fedora, whether or not blivet-gui or any *other* storage management GUI app is also in Fedora. We have lots of space in the repos.

2: the backend for blivet-gui is blivet: https://git.fedorahosted.org/g... (packaged in Fedora as python-blivet). This codebase is simply the storage management backend of anaconda (the Fedora installer) split out into its own repository. The split happened back in 2012: http://www.redhat.com/archives... . The intent was to allow for exactly this kind of code re-use. So there really isn't some kind of new NIH effort going on here: the storage management code is not new, all that's new is the light wrapper around blivet to produce a standalone GUI app rather than using it as a part of the anaconda installer. The underlying codebase has existed basically as long as anaconda has existed, which is rather longer than gparted has existed. anaconda dates back to 1999 (https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/History_of_Red_Hat_Linux ), gparted AFAICT dates back to 2004 (http://gparted.org/news.php?item=180 ).

3: Doesn't really need expanding on, but no, there is absolutely zero link to Lennart, systemd, or any other systemd developers.

4: so the reason to do blivet-gui at all, and the reason anaconda doesn't just call gparted for "partitioning" like ubiquity does, is it doesn't cover anywhere near the functionality we actually need for the Fedora (and, more to the point, RHEL) installer. gparted really is a *partitioning* tool, and there's a reason I keep referring to blivet as "storage management". It handles things that aren't just partitions. The most obvious examples are mdraid, LVM, and btrfs (insofar as btrfs acts as a volume management and redundancy system, not just as a simple filesystem like ext), but blivet has all sorts of other interesting capabilities too, primarily of interest to an enterprise audience (iSCSI, FCoE, blah blah buzzwords buzzwords). We've been interested for a while in the idea of having anaconda's GUI for actively changing disk layout be a separate process, and just having a GUI for assigning mount points within anaconda itself (or something along those lines), and this is a step towards that, as well as probably just being a useful tool for people. We can't use gparted for this purpose, because it's just not capable enough. It's really only a GUI wrapper for libparted. blivet sits on top of libparted...and also on top of btrfs-progs, cyrptsetup, device-mapper, lvm2, and mdadm (among others). It's inherently more capable and more complex. This is why we can't just "contribute" this work to gparted - they're really fairly different beasts, you can't just "contribute" blivet to gparted in much the same way you couldn't just "contribute", oh, say, the backend of emacs to the frontend of nano. It'd be a ground-up rewrite by stealth, effectively. the gparted you got out would be nothing like the gparted you started with. (to discount the humdrum technical fact that they're not written in the same language, of course.)

5: even if you consider blivet as if it wasn't one of the longest standing storage management codebases around and thus accuse it of NIH, it doesn't really work, as it just sits on top of perfectly standard tools. blivet *uses* libparted (via the pyparted wrapper). it uses e2fsprogs to create ext partitions, mdadm to create mdraid arrays, dosfstools to create FAT partitons, btrfs-progs to handle btrfs devices, lvm2 to handle LVM. it's really a logic and configuration layer on top of those tools.

about a month and a half ago
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Mass. Supreme Court Says Defendant Can Be Compelled To Decrypt Data

AdamWill He walked into this one (560 comments)

Yup. From the start of the ruling:

"We transferred the case to this court on our own motion. [FN3] We now conclude that the answer to the reported question is, "Yes, where the defendant's compelled decryption would not communicate facts of a testimonial nature to the Commonwealth beyond what the defendant already had admitted to investigators.""

So: don't admit the disks are yours, don't admit you know they're encrypted, don't admit you can decrypt them. (Of course, "don't say anything at all", the old standby, covers all of those, thus once more proving its value.)

about 4 months ago
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The Profoundly Weird, Gender-Specific Roots of the Turing Test

AdamWill obscure? (136 comments)

"The details of the Imitation Game aren't secret, or even hard to find, and yet no one seems to reference it."

Except, well, at least four of the stories I've seen on the Turing test this week. It really doesn't seem that obscure.

about 4 months ago
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Was Turing Test Legitimately Beaten, Or Just Cleverly Tricked?

AdamWill Warwick (309 comments)

"Kevin Warwick gives the bot a thumbs up"

That's a point *against*, not a point in favour.

Adam's Law of British Technology Self-Publicists: if the name "Sharkey" is attached, be suspicious. If the name "Warwick" is attached, be very suspicious. If both "Sharkey" and "Warwick" are attached, run like hell.

about 4 months ago
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TrueCrypt Website Says To Switch To BitLocker

AdamWill distinction without a difference (566 comments)

So, either they got attacked by someone who was able to both deface the website and *sign code with their GPG key*, or the announcement is genuine.

I think the obvious response is precisely identical in either case...

about 5 months ago
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Robyn Bergeron Stepping Down As Fedora Project Leader

AdamWill Re:Good luck (53 comments)

yeah, it may be worth adding a note about that on the download page...but one of the things that'll be done as part of fedora.next is a complete revamp of that site area, so i'll wait till that's in planning to suggest the idea. thanks.

about 5 months ago

Submissions

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Final Fedora 15 GNOME 3.0 Test Day this Thursday

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 3 years ago

AdamWill writes "Over the last few months, the Fedora project has run a series of test events for the major new GNOME 3 release. The third and final GNOME 3 Test Day is coming up this Thursday, 2011-04-21. Now the final GNOME 3.0 release has been made, this event will focus on testing its integration into the upcoming Fedora 15 release and exposing any remaining bugs that can be fixed with minor updates. This is a great opportunity to test out the final GNOME 3.0 code on a late pre-release Fedora 15 base, and help the Fedora and GNOME teams to produce a great release. There will be live images available to make sure you can test easily and without the need for a permanent installation — there's no need to be a Fedora user to help out. There are comprehensive testing instructions on the Wiki page, and assistance from the Fedora QA and desktop teams in #fedora-test-day on Freenode IRC throughout the day (WebIRC link for those without an IRC client)."
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Fedora GNOME 3 Test Day #1 coming tomorrow

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 3 years ago

AdamWill (604569) writes "The first of three Fedora project GNOME 3 Test Days is taking place tomorrow (Thursday 2011-02-03) in #fedora-test-day on Freenode IRC. Join others and the GNOME development team to test out GNOME 3 and help make sure it's stable and polished! The testing is easy, can be done from a live image so there's no need to have Fedora installed or to be a Fedora user, and you can help out with just ten minutes of your time. This blog post has more details on the event and how you can get involved."
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Fedora presents...Graphics Test Week this week

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 4 years ago

AdamWill (604569) writes "The Fedora project announces that this week is Graphics Test Week. Tuesday April 13th is NVIDIA Test Day, Wednesday April 14th is ATI/AMD Test Day, and Thursday April 15th is Intel graphics Test Day. Even if you're not a Fedora user, you can help Linux as a whole by contributing your test results. The testing can be done using a live image, so there's no need to install Fedora onto your system to contribute to the testing: just download a live image, write it to a CD or USB stick, boot it, and run through the tests. Comprehensive test instructions are available on the Wiki pages, and you enter your results into a table on the Wiki page; there's no need to have a Fedora wiki account to do this. QA team members and developers will be available on the IRC channels throughout each event to help with testing and triage, and to work on some of the problems immediately. If you have time, please check out the Wiki pages and join the IRC channel — #fedora-test-day on the Freenode network — to help out! You can use WebIRC if you're not a regular IRC user — just click that link and you're in the chat."
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Fedora 13 Alpha released

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 4 years ago

AdamWill (604569) writes "The first pre-release of Fedora 13, Fedora 13 Alpha, has been announced and is available here. As always, a new Fedora brings a bundle of new features, including available experimental open source 3D acceleration support for NVIDIA graphics adapters, automatic printer driver installation, easy color management on the GNOME desktop, a bundle of improvements to NetworkManager and more. Known issues are here."
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Fedora 12's package installation policy tightened

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 4 years ago

AdamWill (604569) writes "In response to Slashdot's earlier story about Fedora 12's controversial package installation authentication policy, the package maintainers have agreed that the controversial policy will be tightened to require root authentication for trusted package installation. Please see the official announcement and the development mailing list post for more details."
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Fedora 12 released

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 4 years ago

AdamWill (604569) writes "The Fedora Project is pleased to announce the release of Fedora 12 today. With all the latest open source software and major improvements to graphics support, networking, virtualization and more, Fedora 12 is one of the most exciting releases so far. You can download it here. There's a one-page guide to the new release for those in a hurry. The full release announcement has details on the major features, and the release notes contain comprehensive information on changes in this new release. Known issues are documented on the common bugs page."
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Fedora 12 Beta released

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  about 5 years ago

AdamWill (604569) writes "The Fedora project has announced the release of Fedora 12 Beta, which is available here. This will be the final pre-release before the final release in November. New features of Fedora 12 highlighted in the announcement include substantial improvements and fixes to the major graphics drivers, including experimental 3D acceleration support for AMD Radeon r600+-based adapters; improved mobile broadband support and new Bluetooth PAN tethering support in NetworkManager; improved performance in the 32-bit releases; significant fixes and improvements to audio support, including easy Bluetooth audio support; initial implementation of completely open source Broadcom wireless networking via the openfwwf project; significant improvements to the Fedora virtualization stack; and easy access to the Moblin desktop environment and a preview of the new GNOME Shell interface for GNOME. Further details on the major new features of Fedora 12 can be found in the release announcement and feature list. Known issues are documented in the common bugs page."
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Intel's Poulsbo Driver A Bloody Mess?

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 5 years ago

AdamWill writes "Phoronix writes about the mess that is the Linux support situation for Intel's new graphics chipset, the GMA 500 — aka Poulsbo. They refer to my own post on the topic near the end. Intel has a reputation as one of the most clued-up open source-friendly hardware companies, but if they can't sort out the mess surrounding the driver for this chipset — which is already used on the Dell Mini 12 and Sony Vaio P, and will be used on many future Intel-based systems — that reputation will take a serious hit."
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One Laptop Per Hacker program offers reduced-price

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 5 years ago

AdamWill writes "Emtec, the company behind the Gdium netbook, is launching the One Laptop Per Hacker program. Interested developers can apply to get a pre-release Gdium system at a reduced price of 250. Taking advantage of the Gdium's unique system of storing the operating system on a removable and interchangeable USB key, each system provided in the program will come with two G-Keys, containing different versions of the Mandriva Linux-powered operating system — one contains the standard version, and one a complete development environment. Interested developers are invited to register for the program, providing a description of what they would like to develop for the system."
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Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring Alpha 1 released

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 5 years ago

AdamWill writes "The first pre-release of Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring is now available. This alpha concentrates on updating to the major desktop components of the distribution, including KDE 4.2 Beta 2, GNOME 2.25.2, Xfce 4.6 Beta 2, X.org server 1.5, and kernel 2.6.28 rc8. It is also the first distribution to introduce the major new Tcl/Tk release, 8.6. The alpha is available only in the DVD Free edition with a traditional installer and no proprietary applications; future pre-releases will add the live CD One edition with proprietary drivers. Please help test this first pre-release and report bugs to Mandriva."
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A sad/happy tale of Mandriva decline/growth

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 5 years ago

AdamWill writes "Controversy in the Mandriva world this afternoon. Vincent Danen is all doom and gloom, citing declining numbers of posts to mailing lists as evidence of a shrinking community. However, Javier Villacampa points out in the comments that the community is spreading out to different places, and Adam Williamson responds to Vincent, citing fast-growing numbers of users and posts on the official forums."
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Mandriva Linux 2009 released

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  about 6 years ago

Adam Williamson writes "(NOTE: I'm sorry if this is a dupe, but it's not showing up in my list of submissions as pending or rejected, it's just not there at all, and it's an important story, so I wanted to make sure you get it).

Mandriva has today released Mandriva Linux 2009, the new major release of the popular distribution. 2009 is a bold release which brings the new KDE 4 as the default desktop, along with a re-designed installer and Mandriva Control Center and many other new features. Other significant updates include GNOME 2.24, OpenOffice.org 3, Mozilla Firefox 3, and kernel 2.6.27. Key features include new graphical in-line upgrade capability, netbook compatibility, class-leading hardware support, and further improved support for working with mobile devices. For more details, see the Release Tour and the Release Notes. Get it at the download page, or go straight to the torrent list."

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Mandriva Linux 2009 RC2 released

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 5 years ago

AdamWill writes "Mandriva has today released Mandriva Linux 2009 RC2, the last pre-release before the final release. 2009 is a significant release, featuring KDE 4.1.1 as the default desktop, GNOME 2.24, Firefox 3, OpenOffice.org 3, kernel 2.6.27 and many more significant updates. It also comes with a redesigned installer and Mandriva Control Center. Significant changes in RC2 since RC1 include improved boot speed, support for LUKS encryption of partitions in the Mandriva tools, and some important improvements to hardware support. Download locations are in the link."
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Reimagining The Desktop: a discussion of KDE 4

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 6 years ago

AdamWill writes "Here is an interesting discussion of the changes KDE 4 brings to desktop interaction. It's a very comprehensive and thoughtful discussion and explanation of the new features KDE 4 introduces and what they mean for how you interact with your desktop. If you're not sure how to go about using KDE 4 to its full potential, read it!"
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Mandriva joins the netbook market with the GDium

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 6 years ago

AdamWill writes "Lately it's hard to avoid the buzz about netbooks — the small, cheap laptop systems that were popularized by the Asus Eee PC. Mandriva is providing the innovative operating system for the upcoming GDium netbook system, produced by Emtec. The first GDium will be a netbook with a 10", 1024x600 resolution display and a battery life of four hours, weighing in at 1.1kg. The innovative G-Key system stores the Mandriva operating system and all the user data on a USB key — nothing is permanently stored inside the GDium. You can use your own desktop and data by plugging the G-Key into any GDium."
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Mandriva Linux 2009 Alpha 2 released

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 6 years ago

AdamWill writes "Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring Alpha 2 is released today, marking the first public pre-release of the upcoming Mandriva Linux 2009. This alpha introduces several significant changes, most obviously the inclusion of KDE 4 — 4.1 beta 2, specifically — as the default version of KDE, and the latest development version of GNOME, 2.23.4. The kernel has also been updated to release 2.6.26rc7. Another feature of interest to many users will be the addition of orphan package tracking (and optional automatic removal) to the urpmi package manager. Of course, many applications have been updated (although the default version of Mozilla Firefox is still currently 2.0.x), and most of the distribution has been rebuilt with a new GCC version, 4.3. Please make sure to read the Errata and Release Notes, and file any bugs not covered in those pages on Bugzilla. Mandriva warns that this is a true alpha, likely to contain many bugs related to the new version of KDE. Please install it only in a test environment, and especially do not use it as an upgrade from any earlier Mandriva Linux release."
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Mandriva Linux 2009 plans announced

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 6 years ago

AdamWill writes "Mandriva has released the planned schedule and technical specifications for its next release, Mandriva Linux 2009. These can be found on the Mandriva Wiki. The schedule calls for a first alpha release on June 25th, with the final release set for early October. Planned features include KDE 4, Firefox 3, OpenOffice.org 3, a new design for the installer, a live distribution upgrade mode for MandrivaUpdate, and improvements to many of the Mandriva tools. Take a look and see what you may find on your system when the final Mandriva Linux 2009 release is available."
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Mandriva Flash 2008 Spring released

AdamWill AdamWill writes  |  more than 6 years ago

AdamWill writes "Mandriva today announces the release of Mandriva Flash 2008 Spring, the new release of its popular bootable distribution on a USB key. This new version uses the new Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring as its base, doubles the key's capacity to 8GB, introduces a new installer which allows you to install Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring to the system's hard disk, and comes in an attractive new white color scheme. It's available now from the Mandriva Store for 59 or US$69."
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