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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

Adrian Lopez Re: The language in the old west (387 comments)

That's not what you said earlier.

I'm not BasilBrush, so there's no "what I said earlier" to speak of. What *I* am saying, however, is that speaking of walking up to someone and yelling "motherfucker" is missing BasilBrush's point, because the word's function in that particular context is that of a whole sentence. Saying what amounts to "you regularly have sex with your own mother!" is what might get you clobbered, not the word itself. Walk up to a person and yell "motherfucker!" while pointing at someone else and the person who was in one case so offended as to break your nose might actually laugh about it with you instead.

about a month ago
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Microsoft Dumps 1,500 Apps From Its Windows Store

Adrian Lopez Names that reflect functionality (126 comments)

... asks for clear and accurate names that "reflect the functionality of the app,"

I guess there will be no more "Shazam" for the Windows Phone platform, then?

about 3 months ago
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Supreme Court Rules Against Aereo Streaming Service

Adrian Lopez Re:This now requires (484 comments)

And that receiving and carrying it separately for each customer (using a separte tiny antenna and cheap-in-quantity integrated circuit digital radio receiver) was a transparent workaround that attempted to use an interpretation of the letter of the law to violate its intent).

In other words, you're saying they broke the law by complying with the law.

about 5 months ago
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Canadian Court Orders Google To Remove Websites From Its Global Index

Adrian Lopez Re:Internet (248 comments)

Sue the company who is making the illegal product and force them to take down all sites and advertisements.

As far as I know, the company making the "illegal" product is American. The company's website has not been shut down because it hasn't [yet] been found to have acted illegally by a US court. The BC court therefore wants Google to remove all links to a company that could very well be perfectly legal outside Canada.

about 5 months ago
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Canadian Court Orders Google To Remove Websites From Its Global Index

Adrian Lopez Re:Doesn't this already happen? (248 comments)

Because the right to be forgotten is not designed to destroy the evidence.

Right. It's only designed to destroy any links to that evidence, which, for some reason, you don't think is a bad thing.

Instead it is designed to make it just a little bit harder to destroy someone's life.

In fact, it's designed to make it a lot harder to find the content in question, and do so whether or not doing otherwise would destroy someone's life.

If for example your ex-wife or girlfriend falsely accuses you of being a pedophile...

That's libel, and it's illegal even without the "right to be forgotten". If, on the other hand, the claim is not false, why should you have the right to sweep it under the rug?

about 5 months ago
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Google Has Received Over 41,000 Requests To "Forget" Personal Information

Adrian Lopez Re:The most amusing thing about this law... (138 comments)

It's better than being know for owing lots of money. From the current story it will be clear that he no longers ows that money.

Why should it matter? Creditors shouldn't be looking at Google results to make lending decisions anyway. Let's regulate that instead of Google.

about 6 months ago
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Google Has Received Over 41,000 Requests To "Forget" Personal Information

Adrian Lopez Re:Google has NO responsiblity whatsover (138 comments)

You're not suppressing information, you're just making it very difficult to find. How comforting.

about 6 months ago
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Google Has Received Over 41,000 Requests To "Forget" Personal Information

Adrian Lopez The answer is more, not less (138 comments)

Instead of whitewashing history, how about promoting critical thinking, research, and debating skills so people can get the full picture? People will eventually get used to the idea that you can't take everything on the Internet at face value, without hiding any content or throwing any factual information down the memory hole. It may take a few generations, but as the old guard dies and is replaced by the new, people will learn to better handle what they read online.

about 6 months ago
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Google Has Received Over 41,000 Requests To "Forget" Personal Information

Adrian Lopez Re:Google has NO responsiblity whatsover (138 comments)

By being able to get old search results removed if they're outdated, you don't remove your original record - it would still be visible at the bailiff's office (or for a paedophile example in police records - which are the only source you SHOULD use as a definitive reference) - so "B" can't get out of his responsibilities; B can only influence the filter bubble that is in the google search results.

Why shouldn't police records be searchable? Why can't Google allow them to be searched? What you're saying is that, since the records are still available somewhere, it is perfectly acceptable to make them almost impossible to find. That's not good.

about 6 months ago
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Kids With Wheels: Should the Unlicensed Be Allowed To 'Drive' Autonomous Cars?

Adrian Lopez Re:no (437 comments)

I'm sure there are easier ways to kidnap a child than to rewrite the firmware on a particular vehicle. As for systematic trafficking in people through the use of hacked vehicles, I doubt such a practice would be sustainable except in places where human trafficking isn't already commonplace.

about 6 months ago
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Kids With Wheels: Should the Unlicensed Be Allowed To 'Drive' Autonomous Cars?

Adrian Lopez Re:no (437 comments)

"Let alone the most obvious danger hacking of the service to facilitate remote control abduction of children."

FUD.

about 6 months ago
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Kids With Wheels: Should the Unlicensed Be Allowed To 'Drive' Autonomous Cars?

Adrian Lopez Re:no (437 comments)

If we talk about near future it seems unlikely that an autonomous car will be able to handle all possible situations

You know what else isn't able to handle all possible situations? A human driver.

In fact, human reaction times are pretty lousy compared to computers. If anything, allowing a vehicle's occupants to override an automated system could lead to more accidents rather than fewer ones.

about 6 months ago
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Adobe Creative Cloud Services Offline (Again?)

Adrian Lopez Re:NO Photoshop for you! (164 comments)

No, it only increases Adobe's control over their own software. This does not give them control over you.

You're being intentionally obtuse. It not only gives Adobe control over their software, but also control over your ability to use the software. That's the only kind of "control over you" Dogtanian was talking about.

The fact that Adobe once offered an unlimited license to their software was their choice at the time. It didn't entitle you to anything regarding their future business.

None of which is in dispute, as I'm sure you know.

about 6 months ago
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EU Court Backs 'Right To Be Forgotten'

Adrian Lopez The right to remember (153 comments)

Any "right to be forgotten" needs to be accompanied by a "right to remember". Information legitimately published should never have to be removed from the web or pruned from search results. Information disclosed illegally is, of course, a different matter, but legitimate information, once published, should never be suppressed.

Yesterdays decision is a blow to freedom of speech. It allows sweeping factual, legitimately published information under the rug simply because the subject doesn't like the fact that the information is public. It is censorship and nothing less.

about 6 months ago
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EU Court of Justice Paves Way For "Right To Be Forgotten" Online

Adrian Lopez Re:Censorship (199 comments)

"That's actually what the law does - it doesn't allow removal of say, newspaper articles. It does however allow the removal of links to such articles."

The law doesn't allow removal of the newspaper articles; It only allows removal of any and all external references to it. That makes me feel soooo much better.

about 6 months ago
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Ouya Dropping 'Free-to-Play' Requirement

Adrian Lopez Re:Dumb move... (107 comments)

They are a barely alive gaming platform and they are starting remove features they were built upon...

On the other hand, requiring developers to offer "free to play" versions of their games makes the platform less attractive to them, and a console is nothing without developers.

about 8 months ago
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AT&T Exec Calls Netflix "Arrogant" For Expecting Net Neutrality

Adrian Lopez Re:It's not arrogant, it's correct. (466 comments)

Netflix wants "sufficient access to [ISP networks] without charge", but that doesn't have to mean peering. Netflix doesn't want ISPs neglecting indirect routes to content in order to push services like Netflix into connecting directly to their networks.

about 8 months ago
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AT&T Exec Calls Netflix "Arrogant" For Expecting Net Neutrality

Adrian Lopez Re:It's not arrogant, it's correct. (466 comments)

Nope. Go peddle your bullshit somewhere else. I ain't buying.

about 8 months ago
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AT&T Exec Calls Netflix "Arrogant" For Expecting Net Neutrality

Adrian Lopez Re:It's not arrogant, it's correct. (466 comments)

You and AT&T are employing what is known as a "straw man argument". Netflix doesn't want free peering arrangements. Stop intentionally misrepresenting their position.

about 8 months ago
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AT&T Exec Calls Netflix "Arrogant" For Expecting Net Neutrality

Adrian Lopez Re:It's not arrogant, it's correct. (466 comments)

But instead of buying more bandwidth, or purchasing from additional upstream providers, they yell about other people's networks not having enough andwidth.

Wrong. Netflix is "yelling" about being charged extra for bandwidth that Netflix's own provider has already negotiated with AT&T.

about 8 months ago

Submissions

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Senator Wyden Promises to Read Out Names of PROTEC

Adrian Lopez Adrian Lopez writes  |  about 3 years ago

Adrian Lopez writes "As the US Senate prepares to vote on the so-called PROTECT IP Act, Senator Ron Wyden has reiterated his opposition to the bill and has promised to actually use his allotted time to filibuster on the bill if he has to. Wyden is promising to read the names of people who signed petitions against PROTECT IP. So if you'd like your name to go into the official record of the US Senate as being against PIPA, here's your chance... You can sign at that link."
Link to Original Source
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House Judiciary Committee SOPA Hearings Stacked 5

Adrian Lopez Adrian Lopez writes  |  about 3 years ago

Adrian Lopez writes "Techdirt reports that 'apparently, the folks behind SOPA are really scared to hear from the opposition. We all expected that the Judiciary Committee hearings wouldn't be a fair fight. In Congress, they rarely are fair fights. But most people expected the typical "three in favor, one against" weighted hearings. That's already childish, but it seems that the Judiciary Committee has decided to take the ridiculousness to new heights. We'd already mentioned last week that the Committee had rejected the request of NetCoalition to take part in the hearings. At the time, we'd heard that the hearings were going to be stacked four-to-one in favor of SOPA. However, the latest report coming out of the Committee is that they're so afraid to actually hear about the real opposition that they've lined up five pro-SOPA speakers and only one "against."'

Demand Progress is running an online petition against such lopsided representation."

Link to Original Source
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Homeland Security Seizes Mooo.com, Won't Admit It

Adrian Lopez Adrian Lopez writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Adrian Lopez (2615) writes "According to Techdirt: "Over the weekend, we started getting a bunch of reports from folks claiming that the dynamic DNS service afraid.org had been seized in the latest DHS/ICE domain seizures, and that all of the sites associated with afraid.org had been replaced with a notice that they had been seized over child porn claims. The main site involved was mooo.com. If you're unfamiliar with the way these dynamic DNS services work, they basically let you put a permanent URL, often using a subdomain like putsomesubdomainhere.mooo.com, and then you point it at whatever machine is actually hosting your content. For some folks and some projects, it's easier than getting your own full URL. But, of course, as a service, it can point to just about any kind of content. Remember, afraid isn't hosting any of this stuff. It's basically just acting as a directory."

When they asked the Department of Homeland Security about it, they got a non-responsive reply: "I sent off a quick email to a press contact at Homeland Security, asking a simple question: did Homeland Security seize — and then unseize — the mooo.com domain? It seemed like a simple yes or no question, and given that Homeland Security is a part of the Obama administration, which has promised the utmost transparency, I figured the least it could do was provide that simple answer. Instead, the response I got was: 'I need to refer you to DOJ for a response to your question.'""

Link to Original Source
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Internet Blacklist Back in Congress

Adrian Lopez Adrian Lopez writes  |  about 4 years ago

Adrian Lopez (2615) writes "A bill giving the government the power to shut down Web sites that host materials that infringe copyright is making its way quietly through the lame-duck session of Congress, raising the ire of free-speech groups and prompting a group of academics to lobby against the effort.

The Combating Online Infringement and Counterfeits Act (COICA) was introduced in Congress this fall by Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT). It would grant the federal government the power to block access to any Web domain that is found to host copyrighted material without permission.

Opponents note that the powers given the government under the bill are very broad. Because the bill targets domain names and not specific materials, an entire Web site can be shut down. So for example, if the US determines that there are copyright-infringing materials on YouTube, it could theoretically block access to all of YouTube, whether or not particular material being accessed infringes copyright."

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Internet Blacklist Bill Up for Vote on Thursday

Adrian Lopez Adrian Lopez writes  |  about 4 years ago

Adrian Lopez (2615) writes "The Internet blacklist bill known as COICA is up for vote on Thursday, with the first vote to be conducted by the Senate Judiciary Committee. Senators for California, Vermont, Wisconsin, New York, Minnesota, and Illinois will be the key votes in deciding whether COICA passes. Residents of those states are encouraged to contact their senators and let them know they oppose the bill.

COICA would let the US Attorney General create a blacklist of domains that every American ISP would be required to block. Wikileaks, YouTube, and others are all at risk. Human rights advocates, constitutional law experts, and the people who invented the Internet have all spoken out against this bill — but some of the most powerful industries in the country are demanding that Congress rush it through. The music industry is even having all of their employees call Congress to pose as citizens in support of the bill.

This bill is as bad for Americans and bad for the Internet. The decision to take down US and foreign websites shouldn't rest with the US Attorney General, and it should never be as easy as adding a website to a central list.

Demand Progress has a petition online which residents of the above and other US states are encouraged to sign."
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Help prevent the creation of an Internet blacklist

Adrian Lopez Adrian Lopez writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Adrian Lopez (2615) writes "The Senate is considering a bill that would create an online blacklist of Internet domain names. Hollywood has been stumping hard for this bill and unless we speak up, it could sail through Congress in the next couple weeks. Click here to sign Demand Progress' petition. GamePolitics also makes an important suggestion: "Senator Patrick Leahy is up for re-election, so if you don't like this law and want him to listen, now is probably the best time to talk to him about it — leahy.senate.gov or www.leahyforvermont.com. If he won't listen, talk to his opponent, Len Britton at www.lenbritton.com."

See the EFF's COICA page for more information, and let's give this issue a good Slashdotting!"
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McCain Introduces Bill to Block Net Neutrality

Adrian Lopez Adrian Lopez writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Adrian Lopez (2615) writes "PC World reports that US Senator John McCain has recently introduced legislation that "would keep the FCC from enacting rules prohibiting broadband providers from selectively blocking or slowing Internet content and applications."

"McCain, an Arizona Republican, called the proposed net neutrality rules a 'government takeover' of the Internet that will stifle innovation and depress an 'already anemic' job market in the U.S. McCain was the Republican challenger to President Barack Obama in the 2008 election, and Obama has said net neutrality rules are among his top tech priorities.""

Link to Original Source
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Vulnerability Found in Microsoft's Firefox Plugin

Adrian Lopez Adrian Lopez writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Adrian Lopez (2615) writes "PC World reports that "one of the 13 security bulletins Microsoft released Tuesday affects not only Internet Explorer (IE), but also Firefox, thanks to a Microsoft-made plug-in pushed to Firefox users eight months ago in an update delivered via Windows Update."

The plugin in question — The .NET Framework Assistant — and its security implications for Firefox users were discussed on Slashdot several months ago. It would seem that people's worst fears have come true."

Link to Original Source
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Eolas once again suing over embedded applications

Adrian Lopez Adrian Lopez writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Adrian Lopez (2615) writes "PC World reports that 'technology research company Eolas Technolgies, which won a US$520.6 million patent infringement case against Microsoft in 2003, has filed a new patent lawsuit against 22 companies including Adobe Systems, Google, Yahoo, Apple, eBay and Amazon.com.

Eolas' lawsuit, filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, claims the tech vendors and other companies have violated two Eolas patents, one for allowing embedded applications in Web browsers, and the second a continuation of the first patent, allowing Web sites to add embedded applications through the use of plug-ins and AJAX (asynchronous JavaScript and XML).'

Imagine a Web without AJAX or embedded applications and ask yourself whether the claim that patents do not stifle innovation is at all sustainable."

Link to Original Source
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Hollywood's Victory Over TPB May Be Short Lived

Adrian Lopez Adrian Lopez writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Adrian Lopez (2615) writes "According to PC World: "Hollywood may have won a battle, but the war against piracy is far from over. Unauthorized file sharing will continue (and likely intensify), if not through The Pirate Bay, then through dozens of other near identical swashbuckling Web sites. ... What Hollywood needs to remember is sites like The Pirate Bay are like weeds. When you try to kill one, they grow back even stronger. In this case, The Pirate Bay already moved most of its servers to the Netherlands, a move that could keep the site running even if The Pirate Bay loses its appeal.""
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Neutrality Opponent Calls Google a Bandwidth Hog

Adrian Lopez Adrian Lopez writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Adrian Lopez writes "According to PC World, an analyst with ties to the telecom industry — in a baseless attack on the concept of Net Neutrality — has accused Google Inc. of being a bandwidth hog:

"Internet connections could be more affordable for everyone, if Google paid its fair share of the Internet's cost," wrote Cleland in the report. "It is ironic that Google, the largest user of Internet capacity pays the least relatively to fund the Internet's cost; it is even more ironic that the company poised to profit more than any other from more broadband deployment, expects the American taxpayer to pick up its skyrocketing bandwidth tab."

Says Google:

"Not surprisingly, in his zeal to score points in the Net neutrality debate, [Cleland] made significant methodological and factual errors that undermine his report's conclusions," wrote Whitt, calling Cleland's cost estimates "overblown."

"
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Nintendo Cracks Down on Copying Devices

Adrian Lopez Adrian Lopez writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Adrian Lopez writes "Nintendo is cracking down on mod chips and copying devices with the help of the Hong Kong government:

"The Hong Kong High Court has intervened, at Nintendo's request, to help stop a global distribution operation involving game copying devices and modification chips that violate the copyrights and trademarks of Nintendo DS and Wii.

On Oct. 8th, the court ordered the raid of Supreme Factory Limited facilities, through which Nintendo representatives seized more than 10,000 game copying devices and mod chips over the course of three days. The devices seized are used to copy and play Nintendo DS games offered unlawfully over the Internet, and the mod chips allow the play of pirated Wii discs or illegal copies of downloaded Nintendo games.""

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