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GNOME Developers Lay Out Plans for GNOME OS

Amiga Trombone Re:Goals (208 comments)

I expect you're right. I'm still waiting for the death of the mainframe. So far as I can tell the introduction of new platforms creates new markets for computing devices, but hasn't eliminated any old ones.

more than 2 years ago
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Mathematician Predicts Wave of Violence In 2020

Amiga Trombone Re:One also wonders (397 comments)

Er, do I need to remind you the terrorists that flew the planes into the WTC were mostly highly educated professionals who were hardly in a position where they needed to be bought off? What else could you have given them to buy them off? Perhaps not everyone is for sale.

more than 2 years ago
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US Resists UN Push For Control Over Internet

Amiga Trombone Re:Maybe... (266 comments)

Well, you know how it goes. Provide a socialist with a service, and in a week he'll be calling it a human right.

more than 2 years ago
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Goodbye, IQ Tests: Brain Imaging Predicts Intelligence Levels

Amiga Trombone Re:Intelligence is... (213 comments)

I do not dispute that they may have or will in the future be able to determine someone's potential, but it will be a crude measurement and entirely pointless as potential is worth exactly worth squat until realized.

Not entirely pointless. Is it worth the resources to extensively educate somebody that has very little potential?

more than 2 years ago
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Study Finds New Pop Music Does All Sound the Same

Amiga Trombone Re:Comparison to 'Older music' not fair (576 comments)

Well, pop music in the not too distant past was also fairly complex (although obviously not as complex as classical). Take this 1933 recording from the Boswell Sisters, it's clearly a lot more harmonically sophisticated than 4 chords, and has a number of tempo changes. And this was pop music in it's time, music that people danced to, sang along with, etc, not some form of "art" music.

The twentieth century saw the progression of musical degeneration. First we lost the sophisticated song structures and harmonic constructions of the jazz age to rock, and then we lost the remaining melodic and lyrical competencies of rock to rap. Now we're merely reduced to drumming and chanting. What's left to lose?

more than 2 years ago
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The World's First 3D-Printed Gun

Amiga Trombone Re:But ... (846 comments)

Yes, let's take this to its logical conclusion: perhaps only the wealthy, who have "proven" their "worth" should govern.

That's been the state of affairs for about the last 6000 years, anyway, hasn't it?

more than 2 years ago
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Sally Ride Takes Her Final Flight

Amiga Trombone Re:Safe trip? (251 comments)

no designer worth anything would have 'designed' this world as it is.

Rather arrogant of you to be telling a being presumed to be omniscient, immortal and capable of creating universes how it should be running things, isn't it?

I submit that if He/She/It exists, it probably has a somewhat broader and more mature perspective than you do.

more than 2 years ago
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Google Says Some Apple Inventions Are So Great They Should Be Shared

Amiga Trombone Re:I Dunno... Let's Ask John Galt What He Thinks.. (347 comments)

No. I'm pointing out that since patents weren't available to Stradivarius, his only means of protecting his intellectual property was to keep his methods a secret. To this day, nobody has been able to duplicate his instruments, rebutting the argument that his competitors would be able to simply tear it apart and figure out how to duplicate it.

more than 2 years ago
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Economists: US Poverty On Track To Hit Highest Level Since 1960s

Amiga Trombone Re:Wages as a percentage of U.S. GDP peaked in '72 (696 comments)

Well, the economy was fine - you're problem is that it isn't the 1950s anymore. That is to say, our biggest possible competitor, Europe, isn't recovering from a recent world war, China and India aren't undergoing massive famines, Korea isn't in the midst of a civil war, and Made in Japan is no longer a synonym for cheap junk.

You could have a 90% tax in the 50's simply because there was no place else to go. Try that today and watch your industries and your wealth move off-shore even faster than they are now.

more than 2 years ago
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Google Says Some Apple Inventions Are So Great They Should Be Shared

Amiga Trombone Re:I Dunno... Let's Ask John Galt What He Thinks.. (347 comments)

As soon as a product hits the streets competitors can tear it down and see what makes it tick.

That's why violin makers have been duplicating the Stradivarius for centuries, right?

more than 2 years ago
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AT&T Introducing Verizon-Style Shared Data Plans

Amiga Trombone Re:Oy (307 comments)

It's better because the states are forced to compete for citizens and businesses, which helps keep government growth in check. Notice which states are growing most rapidly in population and aren't on the brink of bankruptcy.

more than 2 years ago
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Google's Marissa Mayer Becomes Yahoo! CEO

Amiga Trombone Re:yahoo might actually have a chance now (302 comments)

If all Yahoo are is a company of cowering cubicle moles, trying not to be noticed and whacked, there's not much she or anyone can do.

I don't know about that. It seems to be working pretty well for IBM.

more than 2 years ago
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A Look At the "Information Superhighway," As It Looked In 1985

Amiga Trombone Where's China? (241 comments)

One thing stood out for me was that of all the nations discussed as possible competitors to the US, China wasn't even mentioned once. This was made less than 30 years ago. Just goes to show you how quickly the unexpected can happen.

more than 2 years ago
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2013 H-1B Visa Supply Nearly Exhausted

Amiga Trombone Re:Client will know (428 comments)

I think you're missing the point. The point is experienced Sr. level H1B workers are sometimes classified as Jr. level employees in order to pay them less.

more than 2 years ago
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2013 H-1B Visa Supply Nearly Exhausted

Amiga Trombone Re:bullcrap (428 comments)

Because we already have plenty of unemployed graduates from law schools, too. What do you think happened to all those smart young people who avoided majoring in STEM fields because they knew they'd be displaced by off-shoring and H1B's?

more than 2 years ago
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2013 H-1B Visa Supply Nearly Exhausted

Amiga Trombone Re:Hire the unemployed (428 comments)

They're so full of precise specifics that the worker absolutely must have that an American engineer won't be able to fit the bill. Then they hire the H1B from the overseas office that they had in mind in the first place (and who fit the onerous job requirements exactly, strangely enough) and pay him less.

Yep. That's exactly how it works. If you have any doubts about that, watch this.

more than 2 years ago
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2013 H-1B Visa Supply Nearly Exhausted

Amiga Trombone Re:Thank God. (428 comments)

There are ways around that. Obviously, a Jr. DBA isn't gonna be paid as much as a Sr. DBA. But who's to know if the guy classified as a Jr. DBA is doing work usually done by a Sr. DBA?

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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"Out of Africa" theory called into question by originator

Amiga Trombone Amiga Trombone writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Amiga Trombone (592952) writes "Christopher Stringer is one of the world's foremost paleoanthropologists. He is a founder and most powerful advocate of the leading theory concerning our evolution: Recent African Origin or "Out of Africa". He now calls the theory into question: "I'm thinking a lot about species concepts as applied to humans, about the "Out of Africa" model, and also looking back into Africa itself. I think the idea that modern humans originated in Africa is still a sound concept. Behaviorally and physically, we began our story there, but I've come around to thinking that it wasn't a simple origin. Twenty years ago, I would have argued that our species evolved in one place, maybe in East Africa or South Africa. There was a period of time in just one place where a small population of humans became modern, physically and behaviourally. Isolated and perhaps stressed by climate change, this drove a rapid and punctuational origin for our species. Now I don’t think it was that simple, either within or outside of Africa.""
Link to Original Source
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Rate of technical progress slows

Amiga Trombone Amiga Trombone writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Amiga Trombone writes "An article in the IEEE Spectrum argues that the rate of technological progress has slowed in the last 50 years. While there have been advances in areas such as computers, communications and medicine, etc., the author points out that these advances have largely been incremental rather than revolutionary. He contrasts the progress made within the life-span of his grandmother (1880-1960) with that in his own (1956-present). Having been born the year after the author, I've noticed this, too. While certainly we've produced some useful refinements, little of the technology available today would have surprised me much had I been able to encounter it in 1969. While some of it has been implemented in surprising ways, the technology itself had largely been anticipated."
Link to Original Source
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Sun's lead chip designer defects to Microsoft

Amiga Trombone Amiga Trombone writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Amiga Trombone writes "Looks like Sun has suffered another humiliation on the heels of it's failed attempt to get acquired by IBM. Microsoft has hired Sun's lead Sparc developer, Marc Tremblay. From the article: "Sun Microsystems has reportedly lost one of its top microprocessor architects, Marc Tremblay, a Sun veteran who was leading the company's next-generation Sparc team. The departure is the latest in a stream of losses that have sapped the company's top tech talent.
According to a New York Times report, Tremblay left Sun for a position at software rival Microsoft. Tremblay led several major CPU projects during his time at Sun including Rock, a multicore processor aimed at refreshing Sun's big back-end servers."

Link to Original Source
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Obama Moves to Link Pentagon-NASA

Amiga Trombone Amiga Trombone writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Amiga Trombone writes "President-elect Barack Obama will probably tear down long-standing barriers between the U.S.'s civilian and military space programs to speed up a mission to the moon amid the prospect of a new space race with China.

Obama's transition team is considering a collaboration between the Defense Department and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration because military rockets may be cheaper and ready sooner than the space agency's planned launch vehicle, which isn't slated to fly until 2015, according to people who've discussed the idea with the Obama team."

Link to Original Source
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IBM Riles Employees With Base Pay Cuts

Amiga Trombone Amiga Trombone writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Amiga Trombone writes "Even as IBM Corp. reports record profits, thousands of its U.S. employees are staring at pay cuts. It's the result of IBM's response to a lawsuit in which the company was accused of illegally withholding overtime pay from some technical employees. IBM settled the case for $65 million in 2006 and has now decided that it needs to reclassify 7,600 technical-support workers as eligible for overtime. But their underlying salary — the base pay they earn for their first 40 hours of work each week — will be cut 15 percent to compensate."
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Amiga Trombone Amiga Trombone writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Amiga Trombone (592952) writes "Immigration attorneys from Cohen & Grigsby explain how they assist employers in running classified ads with the goal of NOT finding any qualified applicants, and the steps they go through to disqualify even the most qualified Americans in order to secure green cards for H-1b workers. See what Bush and Congress really mean by a "shortage of skilled U.S. workers." Microsoft, Oracle, Hewlett-Packard, and thousands of other companies are running fake ads in Sunday newspapers across the country each week."
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Amiga Trombone Amiga Trombone writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Amiga Trombone writes "Those of you who have had your jobs outsourced overseas may live to have the last laugh yet. CNET asks, Will globalization someday stick it to the man? in an article discussing the cost savings afforded to Chinese companies that keep their executive compensation low. From the article:

Excessive executive pay has been a hot-button issue in American politics for years, but worldwide factors could one day make it a liability on the balance sheet.... Since high-level executives and other white collar professionals in Asian companies typically make less than their Western equivalents, these companies potentially will have a cost advantage.
As a wise man once said — revenge is a dish best served cold."
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Amiga Trombone Amiga Trombone writes  |  about 8 years ago

Amiga Trombone writes "Apparently, Amazon is getting their just deserts for the one-click fiasco (not that this is directly related) — from the story:

Key aspects of Amazon.com Inc.'s retailing Web site are improperly built on technologies developed at IBM Corp., Big Blue alleged Monday in two lawsuits against Amazon.

Amazon is accused of infringing on five IBM patents, including technologies that govern how the site recommends products to customers, serves up advertising and stores data.

Some of the patents were first filed in the 1980s, including one titled "Ordering Items Using an Electronic Catalog.""

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