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Android Software Piracy Rampant

Andorin Re:Need to make incentives.. (510 comments)

Yeah, it's not theft and it's not a crime.

0/10, obvious troll is obvious

about 4 years ago
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Android Software Piracy Rampant

Andorin Re:Need to make incentives.. (510 comments)

> It's *99 cents* [with a credit card], ffs.

Fixed that for you. Does everyone have one of those?

about 4 years ago
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Android Software Piracy Rampant

Andorin Re:No wonder SaaS seems so appealing (510 comments)

Your mentality is a good example of what's wrong with copyright today. You appear to believe that because "it takes time and effort to write code," it follows that a developer should be paid for every single copy of his code that is produced by others, completely regardless of the fact that in the digital environment, copies are non-scarce, effectively making them worthless. There is nothing, except for tradition (which has been totally invalidated by modern technology), to connect the ideas that "software takes effort to make" and "software authors must be paid for every copy." Why not pay them for the actual creation of the software in the first place, rather than after the fact?

I'm also interested in how a lot of people are "morally corrupt" because they disagree with your old-fashioned view of copyright. Care to elaborate on that?

about 4 years ago
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Android Software Piracy Rampant

Andorin Re:No wonder SaaS seems so appealing (510 comments)

> GPL... What is it? It is law based on copyright! So if you are violating via piracy you are violating the GPL.
One, the GPL is not a law. It's a software license.

Two, your argument doesn't make sense. Most piracy committed is noncommercial copying and redistribution. The GPL expressly permits this. If copyright law were amended to make noncommercial piracy legal, it wouldn't affect the GPL at all.

> Well you can't have it both ways! Either you accept the copyright or you don't.
Yeah, that totally isn't a false dichotomy, because it's totally true that the only options are to keep modern copyright law or throw it all out entirely.

about 4 years ago
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Android Software Piracy Rampant

Andorin Re:Do they? (510 comments)

> So payday finally rolls around and surprise, surprise, no pay check for you.
This is one of many bad analogies that often get trotted out in an attempt to bash pirates. When you work for somebody you essentially enter into an agreement to exchange your services for money. Your services are not something that can be copied at will; they are scarce, and there is therefore substantial monetary value in them. Compare that to something that can be pirated, which can be copied at will, which means that any given digital copy is, essentially, worthless.

So basically, your scenario is a bad comparison between something with unlimited supply and something with limited supply.

about 4 years ago
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Why The Encryption Back Door Proposals are Bad (Technically)

Andorin Unenforcable (2 comments)

You make good points about the technical faults with the proposed measures. Another thing to keep in mind is that it won't be possible for the US gov't to meaningfully enforce this. They may be able to get the big providers- such as Skype and Microsoft's BitLocker (assuming there aren't already backdoors in that)- to comply, but there is plenty of FOSS encryption software which will easily be able to get around any attempt at regulation of this magnitude. The feds try to get the developer to rewrite the app? Cool. He leaves the country, or transfers control of the project to someone overseas. And how do they deal with the fact that the source code for the unbackdoored version is publicly available? Try to erase it from the Internet? Yeah, that's not going to work.

On the other hand... perhaps it's like the War on Piracy. You can never fully stop people from sharing files online, but you can make it too difficult and tedious for the average person to bother with, and thusly prevent it from becoming mainstream. Maybe they only want to target the big providers that service the majority of users, users who are computer-illiterate and neither know nor care about encryption. Us basement-dwelling geeks will still have our namby-pamby free software letting us have private conversations about how the government totally sucks, while nearly everyone in the country is digitally spied on...

If that's the case, then it's all the more reason to educate people about the dangers of the Internet and the value of cryptography.

about 4 years ago
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Other Tech the Senate Would Have Banned

Andorin Re:Photocopying machines (264 comments)

Yeah, my bad.

What's that Internet law that states you can't create a parody of a fundie that someone won't mistake for the real thing? I guess that applies to parodies of copyright maximalists too.

about 4 years ago
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Other Tech the Senate Would Have Banned

Andorin Re:Photocopying machines (264 comments)

> Who would fund the creation of new recipes if everyone shared them freely?
I honestly can't tell if you're serious or sarcastic, because that's a really stupid question. It implies that sharing knowledge is bad for culture.

about 4 years ago
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PS3 Jailbreaks Galore Released

Andorin Re:As someone whose income depends on the PS3... (167 comments)

> By suboptimal you mean it shows a sales increase when steps are taken to reduce piracy which make it inconvenient for those who say that piracy harms no one.
No, it doesn't. It has one poster /claiming/ that sales dropped with the introduction of keygens and rose when she implemented antipiracy measures. It does not in any way represent evidence that piracy causes substantial harm overall. I already told you this, so please stop repeating falsehoods.

about 4 years ago
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PS3 Jailbreaks Galore Released

Andorin Re:As someone whose income depends on the PS3... (167 comments)

Keep in mind that the only damage done by piracy is from those who would have bought it otherwise. In the case of a $5 indie game, you may say that more would be inclined to buy it because of its much more appealing price (leaving aside the issue of game quality), but the indie game wouldn't have anywhere near the market exposure that the $60 professional title would have. Piracy helps these small indie games by spreading mindshare of the game, and if the game in question is good, more people will know about it and buy it. If the game developer encourages, accepts or tolerates sharing of the game, that will get them some goodwill from the fans as well.

about 4 years ago
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PS3 Jailbreaks Galore Released

Andorin Re:As someone whose income depends on the PS3... (167 comments)

> Why do you expect people to provide their work to you for free?

This is a bad question.

First of all, you can't make assumptions about my motives. Nowhere in any of my posts have I said that I pirate software. Don't make personal attacks in order to legitimize your own position.

Two, the wording of your question is biased towards copyright holders. I see questions like yours quite a bit, and I just now realized how slanted they are. Your question assumes that a copyright holder has to somehow go out of their way to provide their work for free, as you said, but in most cases of piracy the copyright holder has to do nothing at all except release the original work, which is what happens anyway. The phrasing of your question adds undeserved emotional weight to your position by implying that those evil pirates are forcing the poor artist to proactively do something which benefits only them and screws the artist. It's dishonest.

A better question would have been "Why do you expect to have access to the work of others for free?" but my first point about personal attacks would still apply.

about 4 years ago
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PS3 Jailbreaks Galore Released

Andorin Re:As someone whose income depends on the PS3... (167 comments)

> Of course, we watched gamecopyworld and friends for the first cracks to show up and literally the day the game got cracked, sales dropped like a rock.

You know, I've been following the piracy debate for a while, and I have seen this claim and others like it on the Internet many times. There are just two problems with them. One is that they're never backed up with any sort of data that inconclusively demonstrates that piracy killed sales; readers are forced to take the poster at his word. Two, they always start and stop with individual posts on various forums. If piracy were really a big enough problem that it could massacre sales of a game, information about it would be all over the Internet. As it is, I have -never- seen actual evidence that piracy is anything but an Internet boogeyman, or that it does any substantial harm, or that harsh copyright enforcement measures are justified. I think that the need for actual evidence on the antipirates' side is so great that anything solid at all would quickly become popular and well-known. Since there is nothing solid, I have to assume that claims such as "piracy kills sales" are misleading or just false.

about 4 years ago
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PS3 Jailbreaks Galore Released

Andorin Re:As someone whose income depends on the PS3... (167 comments)

> Read this please
Okay. I don't really have the inclination to read every single post and comment in that large thread, but I read the question and some of the highest-ranked answers. The top-rated answer, by Dana Holt, presents a good argument but there are problems with her post. On a pedantic level she compares copyright infringement to physical theft, which is sure to aggravate anyone in the piracy debate and should be avoided. If she has been debating it for years as she claims, she ought to know that speaking in such a way is just an inflammatory thing to do. Additionally, she says that she was able to produce raw data that connected a keygen with low sales, but I do not see any citations for her claims, or any of the actual data. Plus, how does she know that none of the keys she revoked were legitimate, or used by legitimate customers?

I'm just not sure what you wanted me to come away with from linking me to that. It just demonstrates that there is a wide variety of opinions in the piracy debate, and that none of them can be convincingly substantiated with evidence because of the nature of the problem.

about 4 years ago
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PS3 Jailbreaks Galore Released

Andorin Re:As someone whose income depends on the PS3... (167 comments)

Taking a guess, you must be a game developer. While I'm sure it's nice in a business sense that Sony can tell developers and publishers that their console is invincible to hacking, nothing like that can last forever. Ultimately, everything is cracked; it's just a matter of how much time it takes. Personally I am pleased at the level of enthusiasm the techie community is displaying towards cracking the PS3 because it will, for better or worse, eventually lead to a more open system.

And for the record, if you are a game developer, you shouldn't believe the hyperbole and propaganda that Sony and the major game publishers no doubt tell you about the dangers of piracy. It is a popular scapegoat for big companies that don't sell their media as well as they'd like, or that just want greater control over their products post-sale, but there's never been any solid evidence to connect high piracy rates with low or no sales. Just because the PS3 has been broken doesn't mean that sales of PS3 games are going to drop flat.

about 4 years ago
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PS3 Hacked Using Official Controller

Andorin Re:Why not boycott PS3s (292 comments)

> Updates are not forced. If you wish to use every service available on the PS3 that worked before the last update, you can. It is only if you want the new features, the new games, and the new services on PSN that you have to upgrade.

I call BS. My understanding of the matter is that if you want to use the PSN at all, you have to have current firmware. This includes online multiplayer for games you already have. If you refuse to update, you are locked out of playing online.

> The Other OS was only taken down AFTER someone started bragging about the ability to copy $60 PS3 games and play them... Only 5-6 assholes who are too cheap to afford new games but feel deserving of free stuff ruined it for the rest of us.

Another Sony apologist who says the hacking attempt was motivated purely by piracy. Nonsense. If the only people who wanted to crack the PS3 were pirates, then we would have seen a crack much earlier in the console's life, given that it apparently wasn't all that hard. Instead the cracking started after Sony removed OtherOS. Isn't that interesting?

> So yeah, I bought a PS3 to play PS3 games. The fact that it had all these other benefits were just frosting on the cake.

To you. There are also people who bought it largely because of these other benefits. Just because you don't personally care about them doesn't mean Sony is justified in removing an advertised feature after the sale.

more than 4 years ago
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CD Sales Continue To Plummet, Vinyl Records Soar

Andorin Re:I can see why this is popular (431 comments)

Actually, he's got a point. A person who has sex daily will probably value it less than someone who only gets it once a month or so.

more than 4 years ago
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Copyright License Fees Drive Pandora Out of Canada

Andorin Re:Rdio works (254 comments)

Non-intrusive? Maybe they've switched up their advertising model in the last year or two, but the last time I tried Pandora, I got a 30-second video ad playing after EVERY song. That was way, way too much, and I instantly dropped their service.

more than 4 years ago
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Copyright License Fees Drive Pandora Out of Canada

Andorin Hypocrisy (254 comments)

Meanwhile, record labels are blaming the lack of online music services in Canada on piracy: 'Why would you spend a lot of money trying to build a service in Canada when Canadians take so much without paying for it?' said Graham Henderson, president of the Canadian Recording Industry Association, which represents major record labels."

Let's not forget that the CRIA is facing a six billion dollar lawsuit over commercial copyright infringement of over three hundred thousand songs. Regardless of your position on piracy, these guys have no leg whatsoever to stand on. If they're going to go after individuals for noncommercially sharing music, first they'd better clean up their own mess.

more than 4 years ago

Submissions

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US Copyright Group: Lawsuits, DDOS, Bomb Threats

Andorin Andorin writes  |  about 4 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "The US law firm of Dunlap, Grubb, & Weaver, otherwise known as the US Copyright Group, filed suit at the end of August against another 2,177 individuals for allegedly downloading and sharing the slasher film Cornered!. (In total the USCG has now filed suit against over 16,200 individuals.) In retaliation, Operation Payback, the Anonymous-led project responsible for DDOSing websites of the RIAA and MPAA, targeted the US Copyright Group's website with a DDOS, temporarily bringing it down for a few hours. Additionally, the local police department evacuated the office of Dunlap, Grubb, & Weaver after a bomb threat was emailed to the firm. The building was searched but no bomb was found."
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US Gov't To Mandate Encryption Backdoors

Andorin Andorin writes  |  about 4 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "Put off by the general public's easy access to strong communications encryption systems, a group of federal law enforcement and national security officials have pulled together a plan that aims to ease the government's burdens when carrying out digital wiretaps. Under the proposed measures, which are to be submitted next year, communications services that encrypt connections between users, such as Skype, would be required to provide a way for law enforcement agents to decrypt messages- essentially a backdoor in the services. Additionally, any software that encrypts connections and is not overseen by a central authority, such as OTR for instant messaging and PGP/GPG for email, must be redesigned to include a backdoor for federal officials. The EFF's article about the proposal reminds readers of the "crypto-wars" of the 1990s, when the government attempted to undermine encryption software, but failed in the courts in 1999."
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US ISP Adopts Three-Strikes Policy

Andorin Andorin writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "Suddenlink, a United States ISP that serves nineteen states, has implemented a three-strikes policy. Subscribers who receive three DMCA takedown notices are disconnected without compensation for a period of six months. According to TorrentFreak, the takedown notices do not have to be substantiated in court, which effectively means that subscribers can be disconnected based on mere accusations. In justifying the policy, Suddenlink turns to an obscure provision of their Terms of Service, but also claims that they are required by the DMCA to disconnect repeat offenders."
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UK ISPs To Pay 25% Of Copyright Enforcement Costs

Andorin Andorin writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "The UK's Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) has released a report (PDF) related to the new Digital Economy Act. The debate between copyright holders and ISPs about who should front the costs for the enforcement of the Act's anti-piracy provisions has come to a close: Rights holders will pay 75% of the copyright enforcement costs, with the remaining 25% of the bill going to ISPs (and therefore their customers). Says the Minister for Communications, Ed Vaizey: 'Protecting our valuable creative industries, which have already suffered significant losses as a result of people sharing digital content without paying for it, is at the heart of these measures... We expect the measures will benefit our creative economy by some £200m per year and as rights holders are the main beneficiaries of the system, we believe our decision on costs is proportionate to everyone involved.' Not surprisingly, some ISPs and consumer groups are up in arms about the decision, with one ISP calling it a government subsidy of the entertainment industries."
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US Gov't Reffirms Anti-Piracy Agenda

Andorin Andorin writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "US Department of Commerce Secretary Gary Locke went to Nashville, Tenassee's Belmont University yesterday to give a speech about the Obama administration's position with regards to online piracy. 'As Vice President Biden has said on more than one occasion,' said Locke, '“Piracy is flat, unadulterated theft,” and it should be dealt with accordingly.' Locke reassured the attendees that piracy and copyright issues, particularly music piracy, have the government's full attention, and summarized a few plans the feds have for copyright enforcement, including "strengthening the international copyright system" and collaborating with ISPs and copyright holders to reduce infringement. Additionally, he said this about affected musicians: 'Recently, I've had a chance to read letters from award winning writers and artists whose livelihoods have been destroyed by music piracy. One letter that stuck out for me was a guy who said the songwriting royalties he had depended on to “be a golden parachute to fund his retirement had turned out to be a lead balloon.” This just isn't right.' Locke praised the Internet for its innovative atmosphere while simultaneously mourning rampant infringement, which he implies is responsible for declining music revenues over the last decade, and concluded his remarks with a note on the Performance Rights Bill, which requires radio broadcasters to pay royalties to recording artists and record labels in addition to songwriters."
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Czech Copyright Bill Undercuts Copyleft, Artists

Andorin Andorin writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "Earlier this month a copy of a draft of the Czech Republic's new Copyright Act [Czech PDF] was leaked to Pirate News. Among several disturbing provisions include new regulations of "public licenses" such as Creative Commons licenses and the GPL/BSD licenses. The amendment essentially requires that an artist wishing to use a public license must notify the administrator of a collecting agency, and must prove that they created the work in question. This goes against one of the strengths of Creative Commons and other licenses, namely the ease with which they can be applied. Additionally, collecting agencies will have increased jurisdiction over copylefted and orphaned works. ZeroPaid covers the story, noting that the amendment also reduces the royalties which artists receive from libraries by 40%, with that money instead going directly to publishers."
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Google CEO: No Online Anonymity In The Future

Andorin Andorin writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "A tweet from the EFF pointed me to a short article which detailed part of Eric Schmidt's speech to the Techonomy conference in Lake Tahoe on August 4. According to Schmidt, true transparency and anonymity on the Internet will become a thing of the past because of the need to combat criminal and "anti-social" behavior. "Governments will demand it," he says, referring to full accountability and a "name service for people," possibly hinting towards mandatory Internet passports. The CEO of Google also made a couple of somewhat creepy references to the availability of information: ""If I look at enough of your messaging and your location, and use artificial intelligence, we can predict where you are going to go.. show us 14 photos of yourself and we can identify who you are. You think you don't have 14 photos of yourself on the internet? You've got Facebook photos!""
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Study Claims 0.3% Of BitTorrent Files Are Legal

Andorin Andorin writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "It's common knowledge that the majority of files distributed over BitTorrent violate copyright, though the exact percentage is unclear. The Internet Commerce Security Laboratory of the University of Ballarat in Australia has conducted a study and found that 89% of files examined were in fact infringing, while most of the remaining 11% were ambiguous but likely to be infringing. Ars Technica summarizes the study: "The total sample consisted of 1,000 torrent files—a random selection from the most active seeded files on the trackers they used. Each file was manually checked to see whether it was being legally distributed. Only three cases—0.3 percent of the files—were determined to be definitely not infringing, while 890 files were confirmed to be illegal. " The study brings with it some other interesting statistics; out of the 1,000 files, 91 were pornographic, and approximately 4% of torrents were responsible for 80% of seeders. Music, movies and TV shows constituted the three largest categories of shared materials, and among those, zero legal files were found."
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Have Any Creative Works Failed Because Of Piracy?

Andorin Andorin writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "Anyone familiar with the piracy debate should remember the claims from organizations like the Recording Industry Association of America that piracy causes billions of dollars in damages and costs thousands of jobs. Other studies have concluded differently, ranging from finding practically no damages to a newer study that cites "up to 20%" as a more accurate figure [pdf]. I figure there's got to be an easier way to do this, so here's my question: Does anyone know of any creative works that were provably a financial failure due to piracy? The emphasis on "provably" is important, as some form of evidence is necessary. Accurately and precisely quantifying damages from p2p is impossibly hard, of course, but answering questions like this may lead us to a clearer picture of just how harmful file sharing really is. I would think that if piracy does cause some amount of substantial harm, we would see that fact reflected in our creative works, but I've never heard of a work that tanked because people shared it online."
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ASCAP Declares War on Free Culture, EFF

Andorin Andorin writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "According to Drew Wilson at ZeroPaid and Cory Doctorow, the ASCAP (American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers), a US organization that aims to collect royalties for its members for the use of their copyrighted works, has began soliciting donations to fight key organizations of the free culture movement, such as Creative Commons, the Electronic Frontier Foundation, and Public Knowledge. According to a letter received by ASCAP member Mike Rugnetta, "Many forces including Creative Commons, Public Knowledge, Electronic Frontier Foundation and technology companies with deep pockets are mobilizing to promote “Copyleft” in order to undermine our “Copyright.” They say they are advocates of consumer rights, but the truth in these groups simply do not want to pay for the use of our music. Their mission is to spread the word that our music should be free." (Part 1 and part 2 of the letter.) The collecting agency is asking that its professional members donate to its Legislative Fund for the Arts, which appears to be a lobbying campaign meant to convince Congress that artists should not have the choice of licensing their works under a copyleft license."
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French Anti-Child Porn Bill Moves to Senate

Andorin Andorin writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "Ars Technica is reporting that a French bill known as LOPPSI2 has been passed by the National Assembly (Google translation) and will now be considered by the Senate. Among other things, the bill triples the number of active surveillance cameras in use by the government, implements a new curfew for minors, and of course, introduces Internet censorship provisions aimed at fighting everyone's favorite excuse, child pornography. Apparently the French government, including Sarkozy himself (French PDF), is not shy about admitting that these provisions, which will be managed by the HADOPI committee, can and will be extended to include enforcement of copyright. The provisions for Internet censorship include state-sponsored spyware, national blacklists of websites, and large databases of user data known as "Pericles.""
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OiNK Admin's Trial Ends, Found Not Guilty

Andorin Andorin writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "The ongoing trial against Alan Ellis, former administrator of the late p2p website OiNK, ended today, with the jury unanimously deciding that Ellis is not guilty of conspiracy to defraud the music industry. Despite the prosecution's strong insistence that OiNK was a website set up for Ellis to profit from copyright infringement (citing substantial donations from users to the site as evidence), he has been acquitted of all charges. Speaking for the defense, Alex Stein praised Ellis: “In many societies he’d be an innovator, a creator, a Richard Branson. His talent would be moulded, not crushed by some sort of media organization [the IFPI]." Stein insists that the IFPI's members used OiNK to promote their works, only deciding to have it closed down when it was no longer convenient for them. “All of us here are being manipulated to some sort of marketing strategy by the IFPI. If anybody’s acting dishonestly it’s them,” he said."
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Nintendo Shuts Down Fan-Made Zelda Movie

Andorin Andorin writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "An independently filmed adaptation of The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, called The Hero Of Time, has been taken offline by Nintendo as of the end of December. The film's producers write: "We came to an agreement with Nintendo earlier this month to stop distributing the film... We understand Nintendo’s right to protect its characters and trademarks and understand how in order to keep their property unspoiled by fan’s interpretation of the franchise, Nintendo needs to protect itself — even from fan-works with good intentions." Filming for the feature-length, non-profit film began in August 2004 and the movie was completed in 2008. It premiered in various theatres worldwide, including in New York and Los Angeles, and then became available online in the middle of December, before it was targeted by Nintendo's legal team. As both an avid Zelda fan and an appreciator of independent works, I was extremely disappointed in Nintendo's strong-arming of a noncommercial adaptation to the Game of the Year for 1999."
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Proposed NZ Three Strikes Laws Watered Down

Andorin Andorin writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "Section 92.a of New Zealand's Copyright Act, the name for a set of proposed "graduated response" laws, has been rewritten following widespread public opposition to the original. The result: "Guilt by accusation" is now out, and rightsholders will have a tougher time fining or disconnecting infringers, according to Ars Technica. "Under the new rules, rightsholders can now notify ISPs about alleged infringement, and ISPs will forward those notices to subscribers (called notice-and-notice). After three such letters, rightsholders can choose to go to a special Copyright Tribunal to seek a fine or go to court to seek a disconnection of up to six months." While the revised 92.a proposition is easier overall on Internet users, the fundamental premise of disconnection from the Internet for copyright infringement remains. The laws are slated for introduction in 2010."
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Counter Microsoft's COFEE With Some DECAF

Andorin Andorin writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "Ars Technica and The Register discuss the release of software called "Detect and Eliminate Computer Assisted Forensics" (DECAF), a tool developed to counter Microsoft's intelligence tool COFEE. DECAF will monitor Windows systems for signs of activity from COFEE, and according to Ars, it "deletes COFEE's temporary files, kills its processes, erases all COFEE logs, disables USB drives, and even contaminates or spoofs a variety of MAC addresses to muddy forensic tracks." At 181 KB, DECAF is lightweight and can be found on BitTorrent networks or on its own website."
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Mozilla Exec Urges Switch From Google to Bing

Andorin Andorin writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "Asa Dotzler, Mozilla's director of community development, has published a brief blog post in which he recommends that Firefox users move from using Google as their main search engine to Bing, citing privacy issues. Disregarding the existence of alternative search engines such as Ask and Yahoo, Dotzler asserts that Bing's privacy policy is better than Google's. Dotzler explains the recommendation with a quote from Eric Schmidt, CEO of Google: "If you have something that you don't want anyone to know, maybe you shouldn't be doing it in the first place. If you really need that kind of privacy, the reality is that search engines — including Google — do retain this information for some time..." Ars Technica also covers the story."
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Kaspersky CEO Wants End to Online Anonymity

Andorin Andorin writes  |  about 5 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "Eugene Kaspersky, CEO of well-known computer security company Kaspersky Labs, is calling for an end to the anonymity of the Internet, and for the creation of mandatory "Internet passports" for anyone who wishes to browse the Web. Says Kaspersky, "Everyone should and must have an identification, or internet passport... the internet was designed not for public use, but for American scientists and the US military. Then it was introduced to the public and it was wrong...to introduce it in the same way." He calls anonymity "the Internet's biggest security vulnerability" and thinks any country that doesn't follow this regime should be "cut off." The EFF objects, and it's likely that they won't be the only ones."
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ACTA To Be Reviewed by Industry Reps, Not Public

Andorin Andorin writes  |  about 5 years ago

Andorin (1624303) writes "Ars Technica writes about the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, and reveals that while the public does not have access to the text of the agreement, a handful of lawyers representing Big Content and numerous companies and organizations do. "Turns out that the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) will include a section on Internet "enforcement procedures" after all. And how many people have had input on these procedures? Forty-two. [...] Knowledge Ecology International (KEI) found out in September that the US Trade Representative's office had actually been secretly canvassing opinions on the Internet section of the agreement from 42 people, all of whom had signed a nondisclosure agreement before being shown the ACTA draft text.""
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