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Bill Gates Patents Detecting, Responding To "Glassholes"

Anrego Re:The difference... (129 comments)

Unless you own the bar, you don't know that for sure.

Sure, the bar owner or some employee could be keeping copies of the recordings for their own amusement, but a bar that became known for publishing embarrassing security camera footage of it's patrons would probably not stay in business very long.

12 hours ago
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Bill Gates Patents Detecting, Responding To "Glassholes"

Anrego Re:The difference... (129 comments)

The recording functionality of glass threatens that.

Yes in theory some day a technology may be developed that turns a human into a camera. When that day comes, I imagine there will be the same kind of as there is to Google Glass.

When I'm hanging out at a bar talking with friends, as has been said, I have a reasonable expectation that unless someone is making a specific effort to listen in and memorize what I am saying, or using a covert recording device, that conversation is only relevant in my life for that short period of time.

With ubiquitous recording, that conversation can be recorded and analyzed after the fact, shared with others, stored indefinitely, etc. As has been said, this was always a very slight risk as the technology to do this covertly has existed for a while, but technology like Google Glass is aiming at making this a ubiquitous threat, which is what people are reacting negatively too.

Personally I'm banking on society sorting this out. The lack of covertness with Google Glass is our savior. As long as people can spot these assholes, and as long as social opinion of this is low enough that these people will be harassed and encouraged to cut that shit out, this will hopefully not catch on.

12 hours ago
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The Best Parking Apps You've Never Heard Of and Why You Haven't

Anrego Re:Bicycle! And motorcycle. (163 comments)

You got modded down but it's a good general point.

If I'm going somewhere that parking is going to be an issue, I take a bus or a cab down. It's not worth the aggravation and cost of trying to find a spot. I imagine a lot of geeks fall into a similar behaviour.

2 days ago
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The Best Parking Apps You've Never Heard Of and Why You Haven't

Anrego Gotta be kidding me (163 comments)

This is filler spot on daytime tv news sad.

2 days ago
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First Glow-In-the-Dark Road Debuts In Netherlands

Anrego Re:Just use headlights (182 comments)

Meanwhile here in Atlantic Canada.. we're lucky to have a little asphalt between the potholes, let alone lane markings you can actually see at night/when it's raining.

And we totally are doing it wrong. Cheap paint, shoddy quick patch jobs that sometimes fail in the same day (I sat in a tim hortons looking out the window and watched in awe as a team poured some filler into a hole filled with water. The water was literally splashing out as they poured).

It's gotten so bad that it's actually a major news story here.

2 days ago
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Interviews: Ask Bre Pettis About Making Things

Anrego Re:Do you ever get tired? (69 comments)

My argument is more along the lines of most technology started out as shit and then got better. If you think about it, it's pretty rare for a technology to develop strong interest and not improve over time. Bad ideas usually die quickly. Good ones tend to hang in there until they eventually pan out (or hit some kind of insurmountable obstacle).

More to the point, there is an obvious trend of improvement, and a visible horizon where ideas are currently "being worked on" with no reason to suspect they won't eventually happen (like the water soluble support materials thing). You can very clearly see progress from where this whole thing started, to where we are now, to where things are heading. I don't see anything indicating that's going to stop.

Ultimately though I wasn't arguing specifically that 3D printing is going to be a huge success based on the fact that ereaders were. I was arguing that it's too early to call it. Just as ereaders initially sucked then got better, so could 3D printers. Wasn't meant to be an argument that they would, just that they could.

about a week ago
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Interviews: Ask Bre Pettis About Making Things

Anrego Re:Do you ever get tired? (69 comments)

Uh..

Not even sure if trolling at this point. The primary tech behind those readers, "electronic paper", has been an ongoing development effort since the 70s. It went from a very primitive technology to pretty damn good, at which point it developed mass appeal and caught on.

about a week ago
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Interviews: Ask Bre Pettis About Making Things

Anrego Re:Do you ever get tired? (69 comments)

No idea, but that doesn't exactly seem like an insurmountable problem. Rotating nozzles maybe? Or some kind of finishing process (maybe laser based?), or just variable diameter nozzles that can go down to ridiculously fine sizes.

To be honest, smooth printing has never been a huge concern to me. The material selection is the wall that we'll eventually hit. There's only so many materials that can be used in this manner, and that's the big limiting factor that I don't see this tech ever overcoming. That said, you can do a whole hell of a lot with plastic.

about a week ago
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Interviews: Ask Bre Pettis About Making Things

Anrego Re:Do you ever get tired? (69 comments)

We said that about ebook readers for _years_ until they finally did become decent.

Not claiming 3D printing is anywhere near practical yet, or will be in the near future.. but comparing what you could do with a 3D printer a few years ago to now, you definitely see real progress.

We still haven't hit the limit of what we can do with robotically controlled glue guns yet. The coming wave is multi-headed printers with dissolving materials that can be used as temporary filler, allowing the printing of complex inner workings and eliminating one of the biggest problems we currently have: dealing with gravity.

about a week ago
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Interviews: Ask Bre Pettis About Making Things

Anrego Re:3D Printing (69 comments)

Besides patents, there's a lot of other obstacles to home laser sintering based printers.

Sourcing that metal powder, sourcing the inert gas you need to use, the cost of the laser (though some of that comes down to patents, it's still not as cheap as a "hot metal thing"), safety concerns, fumes, etc..

I think the truth is that the robotic glue gun approach is going to be the best we get for a while.

about a week ago
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Interviews: Ask Bre Pettis About Making Things

Anrego Re:Tell me... (69 comments)

I highly doubt they'll answer this, but I'd be curious to know what kind of impact they actually felt from doing this. Did they actually see a drop in their sales? Personally they lost a potential customer in me, but I get that nerd range as a thing tends to appear more wide spread than it actually is.

about a week ago
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Heartbleed OpenSSL Vulnerability: A Technical Remediation

Anrego Re:Mountain out of a molehill (239 comments)

It's not easy to fix leaked data.

You can revoke keys, change passwords, and patch the software, but you can't revoke the data that was already sent with them (and can now be decoded) no more than you can you revoke the bits of data that could have been stolen.

about a week ago
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Princeton Students Develop Open Source Voice Control Platform For Any Device

Anrego Re:Open source platform for Voice control (34 comments)

My experience is the rasp pi just isn't stable enough in that kind of configuration for serious use (other experiences may vary). When you get higher USB traffic or eth traffic, it fails, and when it fails spectacularly and usually takes the board down with it. There are better boards out there are a slightly higher price range that can handle this no problem.

Don't get me wrong, I love the rasp pi and I think it's awesome what they've done and more importantly what they've started (this kinda ultra cheap computer was a dream just a little while ago, now you've got a wide variety, and I believe the rasp pi was directly responsible for this). The reality is however that a good number of alternatives have popped up at a variety of price points, many better suited for a lot of the purposes we originally were salivating over for the pi. Definitely worth looking around before trying to force a pi to do it.

about a week ago
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Interview: John McAfee Answers Your Questions

Anrego Re:charming guy (124 comments)

One can find something interesting while not agreeing with it in the slightest. At least I can.

about two weeks ago
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Interview: John McAfee Answers Your Questions

Anrego Damn Fascinating (124 comments)

I have no practical use for any of this info (I'd probably piss myself if I was in any of the situations you describe) but damn was it fun to read!

about two weeks ago
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Fifty Years Ago IBM 'Bet the Company' On the 360 Series Mainframe

Anrego Re:software (169 comments)

Yup.

I know someone who is a guru in foxpro. Remember foxpro! I laughed until she pointed out that it had basically paid for her house.

It seems like one of those bubbles that's too late to get into now, but if you got into it 10 years ago, you are now very well off with probably enough remaining work out there to ride out to retirement.

about two weeks ago
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Fifty Years Ago IBM 'Bet the Company' On the 360 Series Mainframe

Anrego Re:software (169 comments)

You have to weight that cost, and the ongoing cost of that approach against migrating to something new.

As pre-canned software becomes more flexible and cheaper, and talent to tweak it into what you need, simply tossing out a perfectly functional system starts to make more sense.

Then again, we've got crap like SAP as a pretty good encouragement to pour more money into that old mainframe and hold off for a few more decades..

about two weeks ago
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Fifty Years Ago IBM 'Bet the Company' On the 360 Series Mainframe

Anrego Love it (169 comments)

"We don't see mainframes as legacy technology," says Charlie Ewen. "They are resilient, robust and are very cost-effective for some of the work we do."

Love this kind of talk! Go get'em Charlie Ewen!

about two weeks ago

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