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Windows 8: .NET Versus HTML5 Metro App Development

Anthony_Cargile Re:Idiot (179 comments)

Don't confuse "specification" with "implementation." Nowhere in the article is Mono mentioned, as it is a non-Microsoft application of the CLI specification. I was specifically referring to Microsoft-published software, and as mentioned above in a separate thread, I was correct in referring to the bytecode (CIL) with respect to how it can be interpreted by a Microsoft VM on either architecture. Obvious by my confusion with the command-line, I wasn't even aware there was an approved specification for .NET's VM (or any Microsoft product, for that matter). But regardless of whether it's standardized for all to use or not, the article focuses on Microsoft. Even if it were not standardized they could continue to publish VMs on their own platform as far as I'm aware.

I hate Slashdot sometimes.

more than 2 years ago
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Windows 8: .NET Versus HTML5 Metro App Development

Anthony_Cargile Re:Idiot (179 comments)

Nowhere in the article did I say that CIL executes anything. Every instance of CIL was meant to refer to the intermediate bytecode itself, which can be JIT compiled by a virtual machine (the CLR everyone here who clearly did not comprehend the article thinks I'm confusing it for). Re-read the article carefully, keeping this in mind, and I might not appear as stupid as everyone here believes me to be regarding a subject that they themselves must not completely understand.

more than 2 years ago
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Windows 8: .NET Versus HTML5 Metro App Development

Anthony_Cargile Re:Idiot (179 comments)

This guy is a complete moron. First, it's called the CLI, not the CIL. Second, it's called the Windows Runtime or WinRT and it runs .NET apps and HTML5/js apps. This is all quite plain to anyone that has even a tiny understanding of the system. This architecture diagram has been posted for quite some time, and clearly shows C# and VB as well as C/C++ apps running under WinRT/Metro.

Hi, I'm the "complete moron" who wrote the article. I most definitely meant CIL and not CLI, as I was referring to the Common Intermediate Language, and not the Command Line Interface. One is used to interact with an operating system through mostly text (curses and cursor-based terminal graphics being a stark exception), and the other allows multiple human-written programming languages to be compiled to a common bytecode form for interpretation by a .NET virtual machine runtime, and the basis of this article was that the same VM can be ported to Windows 8 on ARM in place of Metro apps. And your diagram does not clearly note anywhere that it is valid for Windows 8 on ARM as it is for x86/x86-64. Next time, don't be so quick to jump to conclusions and throw the words "moron" and "idiot" around. Thank you in advance.

more than 2 years ago
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IBM's Answer To Windows 7 Is Ubuntu Linux

Anthony_Cargile Re:It isn't just licensing costs... (863 comments)

Did you even read the Secunia links you posted? Both unpatched vulnerabilities require usage of Apache's mod_ftp module, which I've honestly never even seen used as most hosts and general servers use external (and hardened) FTP software like ProFTPd:

Successful exploitation requires that a threaded Multi-Processing Module is used and that the mod_proxy_ftp module is enabled. (...) An error in the included APR-util library can be exploited to trigger hangs in the prefork and event MPMs on Solaris.

And the second (first in order on the site) unpatched vulnerability deals strictly with a mod_ftp input validation issue. Again, I rarely even see mod_ftp even used as opposed to an entirely seperate FTP server daemon but disabling the faulty module is simple enough in environments requiring absolute security.

And input validation issues are usually patched fairly quickly anyways, I mean come on, this is 2009 and there are too many developers for the project that wouldn't let this sort of thing continue for this amount of time. Not to mention the fact that these unpatched vulnerabilities are nothing compared to the olde IIS Webdav exploit of a few years ago - too bad there wasn't a community aware of it sooner other than the underground black hats already using it to their advantage by the time it was brought to the attention of MS.

more than 5 years ago
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Apple Pushes Unwanted Software To PCs, Again

Anthony_Cargile Re:Not really... (267 comments)

Users don't read dialog boxes. It could've had red flashing lights around it, and it wouldn't have mattered.

Yeah I get those at the bottom of websites all the time, usually because I'm the Xth visitor etc. For some reason, the prize is always a bunch of forms to fill out promising more prizes. (this is a joke, by the way)

more than 5 years ago
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Is a 50,000 file count a reasonable hosting limit?

Anthony_Cargile inodes (2 comments)

This is probably an effort to keep inode count down, so as not to overtax the filesystem. Having a million 1KB files can be more expensive than having a single 1TB file, depending on the FS, which they apparently worked out in order to impose this limit. They could also be trying to keep down extraneous file hosting (hurting their business as a host) in the same manner that you can't share a Comcast business Internet connection amongst clients.

That'd be my guess, in addition to just plain common sense: why/how on earth would you need 50,000+ files anyways? Something a database couldn't satisfy?

more than 5 years ago
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A Look Back At the World's First Netbook

Anthony_Cargile Re:The slashdot effect strikes again (143 comments)

Pictures and the Mother's day rush killed our 2Mbps cable bandwidth; here's a "mirror":

Netbooks are making huge waves within the hardware and software industries today, but not many would believe that the whole Netbook craze actually started back around 1996 with the Toshiba Libretto 70CT. Termed technically as a subnotebook because of its small dimensions (given below), the computer is the first that fits all of the qualifications of being what we would call a Netbook today, due in part to its built-in Infrared and PCMCIA hardware, and itâ(TM)s (albeit early) web browsing software. The First Netbook Computer

The First Netbook Computer

The hardware includes the two (potentially) wireless PCMCIA and Infrared network connections, Windows 95 OSR 2 with Internet Explorer 2.0, a whole 16MB of RAM and a 120Mhz Intel Pentium processor (weâ(TM)re flying now!).

A further look at the hardware reveals even more Netbook-ish hardware/software trends (and pictures below), given todayâ(TM)s standards for Netbook qualifications.

The Libretto (70CT) was certainly not the first small (8â) form factor laptop produced in the early 90â(TM)s, but it was the first to be considered a Netbook given todayâ(TM)s standards because of itâ(TM)s PCMCIA and Infrared connections, used for wireless network connectivity and possibly even via a phone card. The inclusion of Internet Explorer 2.0 within the software also contributes to its ability to be officially termed a âoeNetbookâ (more on this below).

The hardware includes an 8â wide, 5â deep and almost 1.5â form factor containing a whopping 16MB of RAM, a 120Mhz Intel Pentium processor (with added MMX technology!) and a whole 30-45 minutes of battery life.

The software running on the âoeNetbookâ is Windows 95 OSR2, with Included Internet Explorer 2.0 and the Windows 95 Plus! pack of software. The mouse is the nub/nipple/clit mouse, given the lack of trackpad hardware and the only alternative being the bulky ball-based mice of the time, and the actual mouse buttons are mounted on the back.

I donâ(TM)t consider Internet Explorer 2.0 being the most supported browser for web-based applications (hell, I donâ(TM)t even support 6 or 7), and 16MB doesnâ(TM)t sound like a whole lot of RAM for storing a large web page and JavaScript into memory along with the operating system, but around the year 1996 this laptop/subnotebook/netbook would meet all the requirements given its environment to be called a Netbook as we would today.

Other hardware besides what was listed above includes a (HiFi?) 1/4â sound port on the back, a mono speaker on the front above the mouse, and a proprietary docking port on the bottom.

The Pentium MMX and bulky battery connector doesnâ(TM)t exactly make this ACPI-lacking portable the most environmentally-friendly book of all time, but it is certain that it must have gotten the job done in its time.

The screen was a very low-resolution (640Ã--480) 5â LCD screen, leaving enough room on the front for the mouse, speaker, power button, and all-too-important logos of Intel and Toshiba.

While I write this largely with humorous intent, it is worth noting the satire I intend to make of the industryâ(TM)s buzzwords for modern products that sometimes have been out for quite a while, e.g. cloud computing versus clustering/distributed applications and âoehigh-speed Internetâ versus what a T1/ATM connection was over decade ago.

Also, something patent trolls working for Toshiba might wish to investigate are the 22 patents listed on the bottom of the Libretto model (pictured below). What these patents cover and how many modern netbooks/subnotebooks violate these are unknown to me, although Iâ(TM)m sure you could find a few with the right research as these patents were approved less than 25 years ago.

Picture Gallery

These (possibly slow-loading) pictures display several features of the computer, displaying as many of its features as possible (and probably killing our bandwidth): (and indeed they did)

more than 5 years ago
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My laptop's battery generally lasts ...

Anthony_Cargile Re:Dell e 6400 (291 comments)

and the height of my zeppelin (how else would it be portable?) is 7700m

As if the MSPaint diagram you displayed earlier wasn't enough, I can't stop laughing at the thought of a giant hamster-filled zeppelin flying through the air, and the god-awful grinding the turbines make as it flies (not to mention the discarded entrails after they pass through the motor). Then there's the Slashdot user at the very back, with a laptop connected to the contraption, laughing all the way.

Also, you must have an automated forklift system to actually deposit the hamsters into the meat grinders (they can't just pile in, since you're in the confined space of a zeppelin), and even at that where does the power supply of the forklifts themselves rely? Surely they can't power themselves just off of the hamsters since over 2,000 are needed to power the laptop.

And if you don't have an array of forklifts, what you have? Oompa-loompas? Is this the evil Willie-Wonka zeppelin flying through the air? I guess reading Slashdot can pervert even the most good of people...

more than 5 years ago
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Twitter On Scala

Anthony_Cargile Re:Should have used PHP. (324 comments)

Never was a nail except for the Ruby community that was in denial.

The same thing I said about six months ago - look at the comments on the article. Ruby/Rails never reached the support it needed to be widely deployed, and it's less likely for an ISP/host to deploy a framework than a well-established language. Case in point: more Perl deployments by hosts than Ruby or rails, not to mention PHP/ASP.NET.

more than 5 years ago
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EU Data-Retention Laws Stricter Than Many People Realized

Anthony_Cargile Re:yay! (263 comments)

For those of you whom read the parent after slashdot fixed the problem, this is the original, unmodified summary:

"A European Union directive, which Britain was instrumental in devising, comes into force which will require all internet service providers to retain a href="http://www.telegraph.co.uk/scienceandtechnology/technology/technologynews/5105

Yeah, they forgot a few basic HTML tokens.

more than 5 years ago
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IBM Withdraws $7B Offer For Sun Microsystems, Says NYT

Anthony_Cargile Re:Crap (291 comments)

buying Sun out and firing all OOo devs would *seriously* hurt it as a project

In that case, since Sun is taking the role of old yeller, we should start learning more about the source code so as to keep the project alive after Sun.

more than 5 years ago
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Strange Glitches In Games

Anthony_Cargile Re:Under the ice in Zelda: OOT (282 comments)

Sorry, not nvram - RAMBUS memory (you know, that shitty memory popular during the Windows ME era).

$post =~ s/nvram/rambus/g

more than 5 years ago
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Strange Glitches In Games

Anthony_Cargile Re:World of Warcraft flying off the boat (282 comments)

I have not laughed that hard in a long time. It reminds me of The Onion video on the subject, and it's even sadder because I know somebody who even dropped out of college to wait on tables just to have more time to play WoW. It's really sad, actually, but you made me laugh at it.

more than 5 years ago
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Strange Glitches In Games

Anthony_Cargile Re:Under the ice in Zelda: OOT (282 comments)

There is a hidden cavern down there that looks like it was going to be something that wasn't included in the game

Too bad the mods won't scroll this far, but there's a whole story behind that little cavern - it was rumored to be some kind of fountain, don't quote me on this but I believe a "unicorn fountain" (no BS) that was scrapped in the end. There were found to be little traces of graphics from this fountain buried here and there within the game cartridge, but no playable version of the fountain was uncovered.

This secret, alongside the Banjo-Kazooie Stop n' Swop conspiracies, are amongst the Nintendo 64's greatest mysteries. I haven't seen the cavern myself personally (yet plenty of youtube videos), but I have seen evidence of the Stop n' Swap thing, which may be related to the unicorn fountain in that extra gameplay was to be accessible via an addon hard drive to the Nintendo 64 but was never sold in the US (yet the Japanese Zelda/BK never included any of these features despite briefly selling the hard drive).

The Banjo-Kazooie Stop n' Swap relied on early Nintendo 64 models having nvram retain data while you could swap cartridges, theoretically between Banjo-Kazooie and Banjo-Tooie so as to access secrets in the sequel based on progress in the first, but the idea was never finished in the sequel to the end of the nvram feature in later N64 models. Whether or not the OOT cavern relied on the hard drive (or didn't at the last minute) remains a secret lost with time.

more than 5 years ago
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Strange Glitches In Games

Anthony_Cargile Perfect Dark Zero (282 comments)

My favorite recent glitch was in Perfect Dark Zero for the Xbox 360: I used to get in a rocket pack, and break through the glass roof of the mall so you could land and walk on the barrier that prevents people from going too high. Used to freak people out, because you could shoot through it and the rocket pack had infinite ammo, leading to a very scared group of people on the ground below (in the city and desert maps, at least).

I think Rare patched this up recently, but I remember having loads of fun with that. Just walking on the barrier, watching the others shoot two rounds then stare in amazement was such an ego boost. Other than that, I haven't found very many other (useful) glitches in recent games, nor do I play them enough to find them or hear about them. In fact, I think my Xbox Live subscription expired like 3 months ago...

more than 5 years ago
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IBM Withdraws $7B Offer For Sun Microsystems, Says NYT

Anthony_Cargile Re:Now RedHat can buy them ... (291 comments)

To the contrary, I know a local company that deployed an IBM iSeries (previously AS/400) mainframe in their main office, serving two other locations connected via a metropolitan-area T1 line. The machine itself was pretty expensive, yet covered by a 5 or 10 year (can't remember) warranty. The machine would actually call a support technician out to the site whenever it detected an issue with itself, and this has kept their uptime at an astonishing rate, aided by a decent UPS and the hot-swappable hardware.

They've been doing this for many years, and even though their first IT technician whom set this up passed away long since, they've kept the same infrastructure for all these years and it hasn't failed them. They also do this to remain backward-compatible with the older mainframe tapes, which has proven successful. Even at the busiest times, the mainframe is only at 10% utilization, even though it is a pretty low-end model.

This has amazed me about IBM support, and since then I've always weighed IBM as a candidate in new networks, although many of them are too small size or budget-wise to deploy a mainframe. But this is the support I've come to associate IBM with, can't speak for their phone support although everyone seems to outsource to India for phone support these days (a problem I have frequently with Cisco). But this support with Sun's hardware running Linux for cheap was one thing I was longing for with this merger.

more than 5 years ago
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Debian Gets FreeBSD Kernel Support

Anthony_Cargile Re:I run Debian, and I run FreeBSD. (425 comments)

Two kernels? At the same time? I'll be in my bunk.

That's essentially what cooperative Linux does, runs a Linux kernel and the NT kernel at the same time, often with a special X emulator to get full-blown Linux apps running in Windows userspace with better support than with Cygwin. I still can't wrap my head around how the two kernels yield to each other in respect to the PC architecture, but it's an interesting project - guaranteed to keep you in your bunk for a while ;)

more than 5 years ago
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IBM Withdraws $7B Offer For Sun Microsystems, Says NYT

Anthony_Cargile Re:Now RedHat can buy them ... (291 comments)

And it would aid the economy in the sense of the two pooling their money, and centralizing their spending. It would also aid us in the IT field, as the post-merger IBM would sell Sparc AND POWER hardware, with the option of Solaris or Linux on either one (theoretically), all bundled with IBM's famous support. IBM owning the rights to Java would work wonders for the Java community, especially in the Linux aspect, and IBM would have probably contributed more to StarOffice/OpenOffice using some Lotus material. I was really looking forward to the two becoming one, needless to say, especially for more formidable Microsoft competition (from both a business stance and IT stance).

But ah well, IBM withdrew, so It'll just go back to Sun barely remaining a company, and IBM being competition on a fairly peer-to-peer level with them and Microsoft when it comes time to design new network infrastructures. If Red Hat bought Sun, I don't know if it would be as much of a benefit as if IBM and Sun merged, but for Sun anything is better than their current status - I just wish they would have seen that more clearly when IBM offered them a healthy current-economy-sum for their company.

more than 5 years ago
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Debian Gets FreeBSD Kernel Support

Anthony_Cargile Re:I run Debian, and I run FreeBSD. (425 comments)

Not to mention Android using the linux kernel with a netbsd userland.

And the Debian/Ubuntu package repositories are full of openbsd-derived packages, many of which I run on servers due to my familiarity with them. Apple runs a modified FreeBSD kernel (XNU) with a mixed userland, and OpenSolaris has almost all pure SysV-derived apps just to add to add to all of the confusion.

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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The Xbox 720, Windows 8, and Surface Will Unite Computing

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Anthony_Cargile (1336739) writes "The Xbox 720 is nearing, along with the coincidental(?) release dates of Windows 8 and Microsoft Surface. With all three exhibiting the Metro interface and integrating cloud computing within their operation, it’s no surprise that Dave Cutler (of DEC VMS and Windows Azure fame) has joined the Xbox team to work on the 720 – but what implications does this bring about for the integration of Microsoft’s flagship operating system, gaming platform, and now tablet? A world of fully integrated and seamless computing is very near in the realm of Microsoft products."
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Facebook's Infrastructure Flaws

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Anthony_Cargile (1336739) writes "Facebook just released pictures (shown in article) of the servers and disk trays that comprise their server infrastructure, along with the novel idea of moving power supplies outside of the server separately on the rack. But with the innovation comes very inherent flaws: lack of seismic bracing, no DC bus in favor of lossy cables, and questionable heat management practices are quickly apparent in the released pictures from the eyes of experienced systems engineers."
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The Xbox 720 and Dave Cutler's Windows Azure Integration

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Anthony_Cargile (1336739) writes "The Xbox 720 is nearing, along with the coincidental(?) release dates of Windows 8 and Microsoft Surface. With all three exhibiting the Metro interface and integrating cloud computing within their operation, it’s no surprise that Dave Cutler (of DEC VMS and Windows Azure fame) has joined the Xbox team to work on the 720 – but what implications does this bring about for the integration of Microsoft’s flagship operating system, gaming platform, and now tablet? A world of fully integrated and seamless computing is very near in the realm of Microsoft products."
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SSDs in the Enterprise and the Software Driving Them

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Anthony_Cargile (1336739) writes "Solid state disks are being rapidly deployed in the datacenter by numerous big names, and with their physical deployment comes an interesting paradigm shift in the software that runs atop them: a modernized return of the mainframe era's single level store coupled with XIP (eXecute in place) technology to remove layers of costly abstraction between database software and physical media for better optimized performance to meet cloud demand. Top 10 enterprises are already making this a reality, and open source movements are following in their footsteps."
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Microsoft Releases Tablet: Microsoft Surface

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Anthony_Cargile (1336739) writes "Microsoft's Steve Ballmer just released Microsoft's tablet, Microsoft Surface (the name of an existing technology being extended by Windows 8 to the mobile market). It does not include any collaboration by Barnes and Noble, quelling those rumors, and is Windows 8-based running software very similar to what existing Microsoft Surface products have been running in restaurants for over a year now."
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How Steve Jobs Changed Google Plus

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Anthony_Cargile (1336739) writes "Everyone thinks of Google Plus as a social networking website competing with Facebook, but that is no longer the case — even Google recognizes its failure in that regard. But in a meeting with Sergey Brin and Larry Page shortly before his death, Steve Jobs gave key advice as to what direction to take their company with regards to Google Plus, as is evidenced by their controversial new "umbrella" privacy policy that went in effect this year. Privacy advocates beware, as the problem is almost certainly worse than ever anticipated."
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A Look Back At The IBM AS/400 Advanced

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Bigiron-veteren (1336739) writes "The Coffee Desk has an interesting new installment of their Vintage Computers series on the IBM AS/400 Advanced minicomputer, something older Slashdotters might remember working with. The minicomputer is a beast, with almost every component redundant and built to last a lifetime (or at least until it was end-of-lifed by IBM).

The picture gallery also depicts every component on the inside and out, along with a modern-day comparison of each piece — including the front panel IPL interface, from an era where men were men and acted as their own BIOS and operating system loader!"

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OSI Model's Eighth Layer

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Anthony_Cargile (1336739) writes "A common misconception about the Open Systems Interconnection model is that it contains only seven layers. This is inconsistent, however, as there exists an eighth layer above "Application" commonly titled "User", and this article outlines the causes and steps for troubleshooting said eighth layer (in a humorous fashion, of course)."
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Zombie Attack In New Orleans

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Anthony_Cargile writes "A New Orleans resident, Joseph Lancellotti, recently reported an attack on his person by a man whom he describes was "unintelligibly shouting", and knocked Lancellotti in the head before taking a bite out of his arm and swallowing it. Joseph denies ever having seen the man before in his life, and furthermore the strange intruder exhibited many signs associated with the image of zombies in pop culture. Maybe it's time to stock up on the ammunition and canned foods, eh?"
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The Pirate Bay offline due to DDoS

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Anthony_Cargile writes "Recently, the world's largest bittorrent tracker The Pirate Bay (don't slashdot them as well) has gone offline due to a distributed denial of service attack against them. This is ironic, due to the fact that they are amidst trials for copyright infringement, and many suspect a hijacked botnet is behind the attack. Don't forget about the plans a few years back by a movie industry company to attempt something similar..."
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Unix Epoch lapse will soon be 1234567890

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Anthony_Cargile (1336739) writes "The time is quickly approaching where the number of seconds since the UNIX Epoch will reach 1234567890 — something pattern lovers everywhere will appreciate. If you are on a BSD (or Mac OS X) system, run date -r 1234567890 to see the exact localized time this will occur. For me, it was February 13 at approximately 6:31 PM Eastern time. Enjoy!"
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Google's "searchwiki" adds effects to resu

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  about 6 years ago

Anthony_Cargile (1336739) writes "First noticed today, some changes were made to Google's index (as far as logged in users can see), dubbed "search wiki". The modifications add more user interactivity to the results pages, and is another bold move in Google's more aggressive marketing strategy (like Chrome's OEM deal and the Android commercials on TV). The changes add the ability to comment on, delete, and move search results to users' choosing."
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VMware Server 2 released with many bugs

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Anthony_Cargile writes "VMware, inc. recently released VMware Server 2, and while it takes a radical step in virtualization by means of a Java web application for virtual machine management, the software is riddled with enough bugs and security holes making it the worst application to come out of beta in a long time.

Not unexpected when they are busy spending their time on Mobile virtualization, of all things."

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Redmond's Great Photocopier

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Anthony_Cargile writes ""Good artists copy, great artists steal." — according to Picasso, Microsoft is one of the greatest artists in the technology industry today. Here is a carefully compiled, up-to-date list of all Microsoft products considered to be derivatives of other works, and the research behind the facts."
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Open Office's servers buckle under demand for OOO3

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Anthony_Cargile writes "The recently released Open Office Version 3 has caused such a stir by such vendors like Sun and the Mozilla foundation, OO.o's servers were briefly taken offline due to enormous amounts of requests. The site has been briefly brought back up now, however, for the sole purpose of providing links to mirror sites for the version 3 download."
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AIG executives waste bailout portion on vacation

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Anthony_Cargile writes "After a long tug of war over the bailout from the U.S. government to save companies like AIG, a hotel bill confirms that AIG executives spent $440,000 on a hotel stay just after the bailout was given to them. This means that we all will be paying taxes for the next ten years for among other things a vacation for well paid executives, affecting the tech industry and many others directly as the global economy continues to sink."
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Microsoft's new programming language: 'M'

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Anthony_Cargile writes "Microsoft announced Friday their new 'M' language, designed especially for building textual domain-specific languages and software models with XAML. Microsoft will also announce Quadrant, for building and viewing models visually, and a repository for storing and combining models using a SQL Server database. While some say the language is simply their 'D' language renamed to a further letter down the alphabet, the language is criticized for lack of a promised cross-platform function because of its ties to MS SQL server, which only runs on Windows."
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Wikileaks.org domain name "expires"

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Anthony_Cargile writes "Wikileaks.org, the fearless wiki run by the Pirate Bay masterminds has gone down recently due to an expired domain name from dynadot.com. The site is notorious for hundreds of confidential documents being hosted, and recently made headlines as the site hacker group Anonymous chose to host USA VP candidate Sarah Palin's Yahoo! emails. It is unclear at this point whether this is a genuine expired domain name or a form of censorship due to pressure put on dynacom.com from gov. officials."
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Psystar vs Apple: Uphill Legal Battle?

Anthony_Cargile Anthony_Cargile writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Anthony_Cargile writes "Psystar Corporation, popular in the Hackintosh community for being the first OEM to sell prepackaged custom PC hardware running the hacked versions of Mac OS X Leopard which have been circulating widely across the internet lately, may or may not have an uphill legal battle against Apple computer regarding precedents for either argument. After being sued by Apple Computer for obvious reasons, they announced shortly after a counter suit, mostly on the grounds that Apple is pulling a Microsoft in the sense that they are practicing anticompetitive business practices, strictly prohibited by the United States Antitrust laws, something our pals at Microsoft came under fire for several times which cost them millions of dollars. But is this case wrong on the grounds of Psystar violating Apple's EULA, or is the EULA null because of unfair business practices? This article takes an in-depth look at the precedents set for both arguments."
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