×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon

Baldrson Re:Interstate Commerce Clause (194 comments)

Oh I forgot the clause in the Constitution that says yet another way it may be amended is by a majority vote of the Supreme Court!

1 hour ago
top

Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon

Baldrson Re:Interstate Commerce Clause (194 comments)

So, now that the Supreme Court has wadded up the Constitution and tossed in on the trash heap of history -- essentially making everything a political fight at the Federal level -- when does someone in the military realize their oath to uphold and defend the US Constitution from all enemies both foreign and domestic basically requires them to nuke Washington DC?

2 hours ago
top

Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon

Baldrson Re:Interstate Commerce Clause (194 comments)

If the animal products cross state lines, that is the point where the Interstate Commerce Clause kicks in -- not at the brewers who are selling inside the State to animal producers.

2 hours ago
top

Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon

Baldrson Re:Interstate Commerce Clause (194 comments)

Very well -- so where is their authority to regulate animal feed that doesn't cross state lines?

If all it takes to avoid the expensive retooling is restricting the sale of the animal feed to within the State of origin, it seems that would provide an option a lot of these brewers would choose.

Somehow I suspect that the Feds don't _really_ care about the Constitution. Moreover, I suspect that puts me on their "watch" list.

2 hours ago
top

Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon

Baldrson Interstate Commerce Clause (194 comments)

OK, so tell me where in the Constitution I should look for Federal power to regulate beer that doesn't cross state lines.

3 hours ago
top

Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

Baldrson Re:It's crap (1574 comments)

Thus far my comments have been regarding a hypothetical "treasonous" government -- leaving the definition of that to the reader. However, even if the government isn't "treasonous" it may be that a substantial number of its citizens wish to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness -- even if the government is operating entirely within the law.

The question then becomes less about "Constitutionality" and more about exactly how many people want to depart from the existing form of government and its principles.

What if 30% so intensely object to the present form of government that they advocate armed rebillion toward the end that they might institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness?

Is that enough for the more conscientious of the military to stand down as that 100 million citizens seek to leave what they must see as the moral equivalent to a plantation?

2 days ago
top

Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

Baldrson Re:It's crap (1574 comments)

A little anecdote: The wife of a friend of mine, on the morning of 9/11/2001, was watching the news reports come in and the moment the attack on the Pentagon came in, she blurted out "That was the Israelis."

Your little "lesson" about not attacking the military is such common sense that even some housewives consider it incredible that any but a false flag op would do it.

2 days ago
top

Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

Baldrson Re:It's crap (1574 comments)

History would tell us that asymmetric war isn't fought the way you portrayed in your prior comment -- hence my comment on your ignorance. It is fought precisely to garner public support.

If you had argued that hotheads, loose cannons and false flag ops are not practically soluble by freedom fighters, then I might have asked you to expand your comment.

2 days ago
top

Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

Baldrson Re:It's crap (1574 comments)

You are obviously unqualified to answer for sandytaru. You are utterly oblivious to the history of asymmetric warfare.

2 days ago
top

Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

Baldrson Re:It's crap (1574 comments)

Please elaborate. On the face of it your response is unconvincing. In a domestic conflict there are going to be a substantial number of the standing military's ranks that will be sympathetic to the Constitution -- the lack of honor by many in the military notwithstanding. How many of them would it take to so debilitate the treasonous government's military that it would be no more effective on US soil than it was on middle eastern soil?

2 days ago
top

How the Internet Is Taking Away America's Religion

Baldrson Re:A Religion By Any Other Name... (1037 comments)

The atheist believes the sun will rise tomorrow and acts accordingly. This is a very well founded believe but it is a belief nevertheless and acting upon that belief is to act as though the other possibilities will not obtain.

about two weeks ago
top

How the Internet Is Taking Away America's Religion

Baldrson A Religion By Any Other Name... (1037 comments)

Everyone is religious. Its just that some call their religion their "belief system".

All belief-based acts are acts of faith. And all actions are based on beliefs.

about two weeks ago
top

Was Eich a Threat To Mozilla's $1B Google "Trust Fund"?

Baldrson Sortocracy Is a Two Edged Sword (564 comments)

Sorting proponents into governments that test them is the penetration of the Enlightenment into the social sciences. This allows the social sciences to progress beyond "correlation doesn't imply causation" to perform ethical experiments on human subjects that, because there are experimental control groups, permits much stronger inference of causal laws in human ecologies (human societies) than do mere ecological correlations.

So what's not to like about locales, like the Mozilla Foundation or Google or even Silicon Valley, excluding from their midst those who are incompatible with the social experiment that most people want to perform on themselves? After all, it is only by consent of the governed that a jurisdiction can be deemed legitimate.

Here's the problem:

In the modern zeitgeist it is considered the moral equivalent of Satanism to practice what is called "the politics of exclusion". Why? Because it "discriminates".

These fuzzy tropes forget one thing, however -- and it is something that anyone who is involved in technology should understand in their gut:

It is only by "excluding" various hypotheses that we can "discriminate" between truth and falsehood in the real world.

But no one wants to admit that their religion might be false -- including those whose religion is the de facto state religion that enforces "inclusion" and prohibits "discrimination".

about two weeks ago
top

Cryptocurrency Exchange Vircurex To Freeze Customer Accounts

Baldrson The Exchanges Aren't Cryptocurrency (357 comments)

Cryptocurrency is a platform and the exchanges are an app built on the platform. The security problems have been with the apps built on the platform. The peer to peer architecture is not what is being exploited. Its reckless abandonment of P2P for client server.

about a month ago
top

The Science of Solitary Confinement

Baldrson De facto slavery (326 comments)

You may not have noticed that the US has the highest incarceration rate in the developed world. This is because slavery is such a grand idea that it had to be reinstituted via the prison industrial complex -- a complex that economizes on things like occupancy rates per cell.

about 2 months ago
top

The Science of Solitary Confinement

Baldrson Yeah get them integrated into society with rape (326 comments)

Far superior to solitary confinement, particularly for white prisoners, is to put them in wings with active ethnic gangs to teach them tolerance.

Here is Human Rights Watch's discussion of how ethnic gangs teach white prisoners tolerance:

Past studies have documented the prevalence of black on white sexual aggression in prison.(213) These findings are further confirmed by Human Rights Watch's own research. Overall, our correspondence and interviews with white, black, and Hispanic inmates convince us that white inmates are disproportionately targeted for abuse.(214) Although many whites reported being raped by white inmates, black on white abuse appears to be more common. To a much lesser extent, non-Hispanic whites also reported being victimized by Hispanic inmates.

Other than sexual abuse of white inmates by African Americans, and, less frequently, Hispanics, interracial and interethnic sexual abuse appears to be much less common than sexual abuse committed by persons of one race or ethnicity against members of that same group. In other words, African Americans typically face sexual abuse at the hands of other African Americans, and Hispanics at the hands of other Hispanics. Some inmates told Human Rights Watch that this pattern reflected an inmate rule, one that was strictly enforced: "only a black can turn out [rape] a black, and only a chicano can turn out a chicano."(215)

The benefits of this therapy have been documented by the government's study of the phenomenon:

Prison rape worldview doesn't interpret sexual pressure as coercion," he wrote. "Rather, sexual pressure ushers, guides or shepherds the process of sexual awakening.

Imagine the homophobia to which the world would be subjected if it weren't for the sexual awakening offered by the government's integration of angry white males with the rest of society.

about 2 months ago
top

WV Senator Calls For Ban On All Unregulated Cryptocurrencies

Baldrson Report all user intpus to DHS! (240 comments)

The only way we're truly going to get a handle on this crime problem and protect the American people from themselves is to mandate installation of ROM-based drivers to report all keyboard presses, mouse events and screen gestures to the Department of Homeland Security's central analysis system where they can use Big Data Mining techniques to forewarn our protectors of imminent dangers to the public good.

This may, of course, require modifications to CPU hardware architecture to override any attempts to subvert the reporting drivers, but no measures are too great to protect the public good.

about 2 months ago
top

Japanese Firm Proposes Microwave-Linked Solar Plant On the Moon

Baldrson Dr. David R Criswell and Shimizu (330 comments)

Actually, lunar-based solar power for Earth is decades old, and was first patented by Dr. David R. Criswell in the late 80s. I was working for Dr. Criswell at the California Space Institute in La Jolla in 1985 while he was developing this idea so I know it goes back at least to the mid 80s.

Shimizu Corporation intersects with Dr. Criswell in another way that I just discovered today after searching for his more recent patents.

We've got to attract technological civilization's population away from natural ecosystems into idealized artificial environments such as Shimizu Corporation's design for what it calls the "Green Float". You can house the entire population of civilization in beach-front property on the boundary of a tropical rain forest where people can swim, fish, hunt and gather recreationally, as well as access the height of urban lifestyle. From there space habitats are likely to emerge so that the natural propensity of these "cells" to replicate endlessly needn't destroy Earth's biosphere. Interestingly, I came up with a geometry that looks very similar to that years ago, with the Solar Updraft Tower Algae Biosphere proforma and, over the subsequent years, I found a floating photobioreactor technology that requires little more than 2 layers of polyfilm that has demonstrated production per cost figures far in excess of what I projected in that proforma. Before I ran across Shimizu Corp's Green Float I had further refined the idea based on the Atmospheric Vortex Engine, which, like Shimizu's "Green Float", is ideally sited in the equatorial doldrums and could make use of the central tower of the Green Float. I posted some preliminary thoughts over at the Seastead Institute's blog.

A key problem I attempted to address in my preliminary thoughts was the early market for energy from the Atmospheric Vortex Engines that would form the nuclei for Shimizu's Green Floats. A big problem was the fact that the electric power markets are thousands of miles away from the floating AVEs even if you could build on the order of a terawatt of oceanic power transmission lines thousands of miles long. Early markets are critical for attracting capital -- the lack of which renders such grandiose ideas "non-starters".

I had thought it would be very nice to have a microwave transmission technology that could dynamically switch the power distribution to achieve the holy grail of "dispatchable" power generation for peak loads, but wasn't aware, until just now, that Dr. Criswell's recent revision of his patent serves precisely that purpose.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

top

NASA Langley Study On Cold Fusion's Potential in Aviation

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  about a month and a half ago

Baldrson (78598) writes "Perpetually in-flight "skytrains" with which smaller aircraft would temporarily dock to exchange passengers and cargo, ground-effect flying container ships ala the Hughes Spruce Goose (only bigger and not made of spruce) and vertical takeoff and landing supersonic business jets were among among the aircraft potentials of cold fusion technology presented at NASA Langley's ARMD Seedling Seminar, February 25, 2014 in a study titled "Low Energy Nuclear Reaction Aircraft" (Warning: Adobe Connect). One comment heard: "There is a similar initiative in Lockheed/Martin.""
Link to Original Source
top

NYT: Massive Study Questions H-1b Policies

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  about 9 months ago

Baldrson (78598) writes "The New York Times reports: "An LCA is not an actual H1-B application rather an intent to hire an H1-B worker after an unsuccessful domestic search...Within the top 10 jobs, there are an estimated 134% more candidates nationwide than there were positions requested. Additionally, we found that domestic student enrollment in computer and mathematical graduate programs has grown 88% in the last decade, while foreign student enrollment has dwindled 13%. There does not appear to be a sudden mass shortage of educated domestic workers, rather a handful of outsourcing firms who file a majority of the LCAs and are uninterested in domestic candidates. 82% of the positions requested by the top 20 companies were requested by outsourcing firms.""
Link to Original Source
top

Forbes Takes a Second Look At Rossi's E-Cat Cold Fusion Device

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  about a year ago

Baldrson (78598) writes "Forbes technology contributor Mark Gibbs reports that: "I haven’t posted about Rossi and his E-Cat since last August simply because there wasn’t much to report other than more of Rossi’s unsupported and infuriating claims ... What everyone wanted was something that Rossi has been promising was about to happen for months: An independent test by third parties who were credible... much to my, and I suspect many other people’s surprise, a report by credible, independent third parties is exactly what we got. Published on May 16, the paper titled “Indication of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device” would appear to deliver what we wanted...And now, the big reveal the authors’ conclusions are (again, the emphasis is mine): ' if we consider the whole volume of the reactor core and the most conservative figures on energy production, we still get a value of (7.93 ± 0.8) 102 MJ/Liter that is one order of magnitude higher than any conventional source.'""
Link to Original Source
top

Independent Academic Validation of Industrially Useful Cold Fusion Device

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  about a year ago

Baldrson (78598) writes "An energy revolution has been reported in a joint paper by scientists from Bologna University, Uppsala University and Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, titled "Indication of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device containing hydrogen loaded nickel powder." This is the long-awaited independent validation of the infamous "E-Cat" or "Energy Catalyzer" by controversial inventor Andrea Rossi. Quoting the paper: "Even by the most conservative assumptions as to the errors in the measurements, the result is still one order of magnitude greater than conventional energy sources.""
top

Applied Oceanic Geoengineer Spurs Mass Hysteria Among Political Class

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Baldrson writes "The UK Guardian via io9 reports that "A massive and illegal geoengineering project has been detected off Canada’s west coast." An Amerindian tribe in the Pacific NW that depends on salmon contracted to have 100 tonnes of iron sulphate spread across a huge area in order to spur plankton growth. The entrepreneur, Russ George, hopes to cash in on the carbon credits and the Amerindian tribe on an increased salmon harvest. This is inducing mass hysteria among the poltical class."
Link to Original Source
top

H-1bs Drive Out Skilled But Not Unskilled

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  about 2 years ago

Baldrson writes "From a Notre Dame press release: "In the first study to measure the temporary impact of highly skilled immigrants on native populations, University of Notre Dame EconomistAbigail Wozniak and Fairfield University's Thomas J. Murray — a former Notre Dame graduate student — found that when highly skilled immigrants move to a city or town, the U.S. natives in that area who are also highly skilled tend to move away. However, the study found that the same immigrant group's presence decreases the chances that low-skilled natives would leave." This, of course, contrasts with pundits such as Tim O'Reilly who claim that US skilled workers enjoy greater economic security from skilled immigrants."
Link to Original Source
top

Quadrotor Construction Swarm

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Baldrson (78598) writes "In this video teams of quadrotors autonomously build cubic structures from modular parts. Imagine these little guys flying to battery recharge stations, dropping off their discharged batteries and picking up freshly charged batteries. That would take only about 10% off their production time. The battery recharge stations themselves could be autonomously and continuously redistributed to the construction frontier. Autonomous crawlers could weld the positioned joints."
Link to Original Source
top

Falcon 9 Orbits!

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Baldrson (78598) writes "Business Week reports that: "SpaceX’s Falcon 9 took off on its first test flight at about 2:45 p.m. local time from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. It reached the Earth’s orbit about nine minutes later." This is a victory not only for Elon Musk's team, but for advocates of commercial space transportation."
Link to Original Source
top

A Space Solar Power Satellite A Day...

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Baldrson writes "I've been following space solar power satellite technology since O'Neill's Stewart Brand days (longer than half of you have been alive) and this is the first time it appears likely to happen in the near future: PowerSat Corporation has filed 2 important patents. One uses the solar array to propel itself from low earth orbit to geostationary orbit. The other one turns a cloud of small geostationary solar power satellites into a huge phased array. The propulsion patent plausibly reduces launch costs by 67%. The satellite cloud microwave phasing patent, however, has a huge hidden benefit that I doubt even Powersat has fully taken into account: industrial learning curve of small launchers. A similar argument has been made before by Autodesk founder, John Walker in "A Rocket A Day keeps the High Costs Away. Basically, if you are going to deploy a system with a large number of repetitions, the total (integral) cost is given by the formula: firstunit*(units^(1-rate))/(1-rate). To replace all fossil fuel baseload generation capacity in the US (250GW) would require 20,000 Falcon 9 HL launches (78Mdollars/15000kg or $5200/kg to geostationary transfer orbit) each of 3 BrightStars (PowerSat's satellite) at nearly 5000kg each. Walk that down down an industrial learning curve at 10% per doubling, the total launch cost of a 250GW cloud would be (1-.67)*1-.67)*5200*3*5000*((200*100)^(1-.1))/(1-.1) = 212G$ or less than a dollar per installed watt of baseload electric generation capacity. Assuming 10% energy loss in transmission to the ground array, each satellite would need to generate around 250GW/(3*5000*200*100)kg/(1-.1) or less than 1kW/kg or 5MW/satellite. At 35% solar conversion efficiency and 1kW/m^2 solar flux most of that would be in a weightless mirror that would have to be about 70m in diameter at 350g/m^2 (5000kg/(5MW/(.35*1kW/m^2))). Weightless mirrors can be very low mass and inexpensive. Looks doable. To pay for the satellite itself let's more than triple the installed cost to $3/W. To understand how big of a deal this is: The other near-term scalable baseload electrical sources are "clean coal" and nuclear power — both of which are, optimistically, at similar capital costs per installed watt."
Link to Original Source
top

Spasim: World's First 3D MOG

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Baldrson writes "The first 3D Multiplayer Online Game was published in — 1994? No. 1984? Sorry, Mac. It was 1974 on the same system that Ray Ozzie, Microsoft's current Chief Architect got his start: PLATO IV. It was for up to 32 world-wide users all shooting it up in a space simulation called "Spasim". Watch the video of a recent demonstration running on a CDC Cyber emulated by an AMD64 system."
Link to Original Source
top

Armadillo Aerospace Wins First Lunar Lander Prize

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Baldrson writes "By flying a rocket for 90 seconds to a soft landing on another pad, and then relaunching for a similar 90 second flight, John Carmack's rocket company, Armadillo Aerospace has won the first, and smaller, of two prizes in the Northrop Grumman Lunar Lander Challenge. The first flight was completed this morning but the second flight was delayed until this afternoon due to air traffic conflicts. Carmack and crew have been at this for a number of years with some near misses in prior competitions. This winning flight is welcome good news at a time when many have concerns about a down-turn in commercial space and the likely next President of the United States has recently said of such prizes, "When John F. Kennedy decided that we were going to put a man on the moon, he didn't put a bounty out for some rocket scientist to win — he put the full resources of the United States government behind the project...""
Link to Original Source
top

Fear and Loathing in AIG's IT Department

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Baldrson writes "John Miano of The Programmer's Guild writes: "In the late 1990s the world of computer consulting took me to AIG. Only superlatives can describe what I saw while working at AIG's computer operation. It was the most mismanaged company of any type that I have ever seen...So why are you and I bailing out this company? In a free market, the penalty for mismanagement is going out of business. America owes AIG nothing. AIG has no loyalty to America or the American people. They were willing to replace Americans with foreign workers in a futile attempt to save a few dollars.""
Link to Original Source
top

$1M In Compression Prizes Announced by Ocarina

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Baldrson writes "Ocarina, a storage compression company, is offering $1 million in prize increments of $10,000 for each 3% advance in compression on what Ocarina's Chief Scientist, Matt Mahoney, describes as "extremely challenging data". Matt should know, since, in addition to originating a leading class of compression algorithms and maintaining a benchmark list of top compressors, he is on the board of directors of The Hutter Prize for Lossless Compression of Human Knowledge, which stimulated a number of 3% incremental improvements in compressing Wikipedia."
Link to Original Source
top

Machine Super Intelligence Thesis Wins $10k Prize

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Baldrson writes "The Singularity Institute for Artificial Intelligence has announced Dr. Shane Legg the winner of its $(CDN)10,000 prize for academic achievement in 2008 for his theoretic work relating to "machine super intelligence". In his own words: "My thesis is written and submitted and I will be having my thesis defence in June. The title is 'Machine Super Intelligence' in which I describe Marcus Hutter's AIXI model and study some of its implications, extensions etc." His post-doctoral work is going to be in finance."
Link to Original Source
top

H-1b Visas Not Going to "Best and Brightest

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Baldrson writes "Norm Matloff has published a continuation of an earlier study investigating the degree to which H-1b visas have been awarded to talent unavailable in the United States — "the best and the brightest" — as is required by law. Using a market-based analysis derived from salary figures, Matloff concludes: '...the data show dramatically that most foreign workers, the vast majority of whom are from Asia, are in fact not "the best and the brightest."' Moreover, he further concludes that 'Most foreign workers work at or near entry level, described by the Department of Labor in terms akin to apprenticeship. This counters the industry's claim that they hire the workers as key innovators, and again we will see a stark difference between the Asians and Europeans.'"
Link to Original Source
top

Chertoff Recommends Cyber "Manhattan Project&#

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  about 6 years ago

Baldrson writes "News.com reports that: "Risks from cyberattacks are increasing and the consequences are so great that the country needs a "Manhattan Project" for network security, Michael Chertoff, secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, said in a keynote on Tuesday at RSA 2008... The government needs the "best and brightest" from Silicon Valley and elsewhere in the private sector to work on creating an advanced warning system to prevent such cyberattacks." I'm sure all reasonable readers of /. are now asking themselves, "Why don't they just bring in a bunch of Indians, Chinese, and Israelis on H-1B visas?""
Link to Original Source
top

Free Speech Redefined by Canadian Court

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Baldrson writes "Saying, essentially, that "If it were free speech then it wouldn't be prohibited!" an Ontario Superior Court has ruled that a dissident must pay damages for calling a lawyer for the Canadian Human Rights Commission "an enemy of free speech". The London Free Press reports that: "Richard Warman, a lawyer who worked as an investigator for the Canadian Human Rights Commission, often filed complaints against "hate speech" sites — complaints that were generally upheld under Canadian speech restrictions. Fromm, a defender of various Holocaust deniers and anti-Semites, has been publicly condemning Warman for, among other things, being "an enemy of free speech." Warman sued, claiming that these condemnations are defamatory... Friday, the Ontario Superior Court held for Warman — chiefly on the grounds that because Warman's claims were accepted by the legal system, they couldn't accurately be called an attack on free speech." Additional details of the ruling indicate this centers on the use of internet communication."
Link to Original Source
top

Surfer's Theory of Everything Stuns Physicists

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Baldrson writes "The UK Telegraph reports that: A surfer dude named Garrett Lisi has come up with a new theory of everything which physicists are calling "fabulous", "incredibly beautiful", "profound" and "most compelling". Lisi's peer-reviewed paper titled "An Exceptionally Simple Theory of Everything" is being published with the New Scientist. The Telegraph article continues: "Lisi is now calculating the masses that the 20 new particles should have, in the hope that they may be spotted when the Large Hadron Collider starts up.""
Link to Original Source
top

Text Compressor 1% Away From AI Threshold

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Baldrson writes "Alexander Ratushnyak compressed the first 100,000,000 bytes of Wikipedia to a record-small 16,481,655 bytes (including decompression program) thereby, not only winning the second payout of The Hutter Prize for Compression of Human Knowledge but, bringing text compression within 1% of the threshold for artificial intelligence. Achieving 1.319 bits per character, this makes the next winner of the Hutter Prize likely to reach the threshold of human performance (between 0.6 and 1.3 bits per character) estimated by the founder of information theory, Claude Shannon and confirmed by Cover and King in 1978 using text prediction gambling. When the Hutter Prize started, less than a year ago, the best performance was 1.466 bits per character. Alexander Ratushnyak's open-sourced GPL program is called paq8hp12."
Link to Original Source

Journals

top

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  more than 7 years ago Alexander Ratushnyak's most recent (09/10/2006) Hutter Prize program purports a nearly 6% increase in compression of the first 100M of Wikipedia over the prize baseline. I've verified this with my own system running his program. If this withstands the 30-day comment period then this represents a very good start for the Hutter Prize, which was active for just a month before this entry. Congratulations are premature as yet but I just wanted to share some of the potentially good news with people. If you have any kind of financial means I really urge you to contribute to this prize fund. It is truly the most crucial technology prize of all due to the fact that it represents a proven sound way of advancing artificial intelligence -- a discipline with the potential to advance all other knowledge.

top

"Protestants" fall to less than 50% of the US

Baldrson Baldrson writes  |  more than 9 years ago The following article claims that within a year or two the percent of the US population that is "protestant" will have fallen bellow 50% for the first time since Jamestown settlers.

I disagree with this assessment if one is going to call "protestant" those denominations that have been for individual conscience against the imposition of theocracy -- which is its original foundation.

We in the US have been living in a de facto theocracy at least since Brown vs the Board of Education in 1954. Correct me if I'm wrong, but that is the first time that protestant leadership capitulated, en masse, to a government action which violated freedom of association and hence freedom of religion. (One can easily argue that prior imposition of public education did not so violate the desires of association of the communities in which it was applied, except in principle. School bussing and other follow-ons to the 1954 ruling were clearly taking this theoretic violation to practice in a way that the vast majority disagreed with at that time.) That it was done to the children is even more in line with historic maneuvers of theocracy. The only other contender I can think of is the Telecommunications Act of 1934 when monopoly rights to new broadcast technologies were granted by the government to private concerns -- but that is a bit more problematic as it merely violated freedom of speech, an obviously lesser principle than freedom of religion which entails freedom of speech only to the extent that one is allowed to declare one's independence -- one's secession -- which may, in turn, entail expulsion from the fora of one's former order.

At the present time the war is on between theocracies: Catholic, Islamic and, of course, the currently ruling de facto theocracy of political correctness which is largely a secularized Jewish construction (see Kevin MacDonald's "Culture of Critique"), as was the Telecommunications Act of 1934 in its grant of monopoly rights to the networks (see Neal Gabler's "An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood")

Some people say the US died at earlier points in time -- perhaps. However, the underlying principle of the Declaration of Independence, that every human has a right to "the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them" is protestant. This established the right of secession as the primordial right over all others -- including the divine right of kings, popes or other potentates. That is the true origin of protestantism, of freedom of religion (to choose the social order in which one invests one's life) and of abolition of slavery.

Such a declaration is anathema to many who otherwise think of themselves as opposed to political correctness. They're just substituting one theocracy for another and they have in common, with political correctness, a slave-making mentality.

July 21, 2004, 12:18AM

Study finds number of Protestants is falling

Soon, less than 50% of Americans will claim the faith

By RICHARD VARA

Copyright 2004 Houston Chronicle

For the first time in U.S. history, the number of Protestants soon will slip below 50 percent of the nation's population, according to a new survey.

"As early as this year and certainly, if the projections hold, within the next two years, the majority of American adults will not be Protestants for the first time since the founding of colonial Jamestown," said Tom W. Smith, director of the National Opinion Research Center's General Social Survey.

"We were always at least a majority Protestant country, and that is about to change."

The survey, which was released Tuesday, has studied various aspects of American life, including its religious dimension, for 32 years.

From 1972 to 1993, it found that Protestants constituted 63 percent of the national population. But the total declined to 52 percent in 2002.

The study mirrors results from a recent Harris County survey. Protestants decreased from 56 percent in 1994 to 34 percent in 2004, according to the Houston Area Survey directed by Stephen Klineberg, a Rice University sociology professor.

...

For the rest of the article follow this link

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...