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Comments

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Tor Executive Director Hints At Firefox Integration

BarbaraHudson Re:IE better fits the definition. (70 comments)

Certainly both Microsoft and Apple have more money to spend on this than Mozilla. Mozilla may be looking down the road to the end (November of this year) of their current deal with Google that has placement of Google search as the default search - this deal provides almost all Mozilla's revenue. However, it might make sense to knee-cap Mozilla by not renewing the deal, now that Mozilla wants to compete in the mobile OS space.

The only other real potential candidate for the replacement deal is Microsoft, and if they don't bite, then what? After all, Chrome continues to gain market share - it's the default browser on all android devices. Even if Mozilla worked out a deal to make Bing the default search engine in 2015, most Firefox users will just switch it search back to Google - or switch browsers to Chrome.

So, Mozilla needs to do something NOW to preserve it's relevancy over the next 4-year contract term if they want either Google or Microsoft to ink a deal that will keep them anywhere near the lifestyle they've grown used to.

4 hours ago
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New Research Casts Doubt On the "10,000 Hour Rule" of Expertise

BarbaraHudson Re:Who is Justin Bieber? (112 comments)

I know the bit about him being from Canada and having something to do wtih music and about him being unpleasant to neighboring homeowners.
But is he someone I need to know about to be not oblivious to current culture, that is, apart from "getting" Justin Bieber jokes on late night TV?

Justin Bieber is to music as Rob Ford is to politics.

Both are Canadians, both have problems with the cops, the people around them, the news media, booze,drugs, inappropriate public behaviour, more money than brains, etc.

4 hours ago
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CEO of Spyware Maker Arrested For Enabling Stalkers

BarbaraHudson Re:But... the children!? (119 comments)

My first thought was "but... the children!?" ... I would think that the primary marketing for such software would be for parents. Not that I condone such actions, at the very least it would be socially acceptable.

Not really. People are fed up with parents that are so insecure in their parenting skills that they're hovering around almost 100% of the time - they're called "helicopter parents" for a reason, and like real helicopters, people in the immediate neighborhood of one don't exactly appreciate their nuisance factor.

Does anyone want to be one of "those parents?" Do you want your kids hanging around with the kids of one of "those parents" as they listen to everything your kids say and then gossip about how bad, how clueless parents you are? Or call CPS on you because they freaked out over something out of context?

7 hours ago
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Tor Executive Director Hints At Firefox Integration

BarbaraHudson IE better fits the definition. (70 comments)

Firefox has been well over 20% for years.

IE dropped below 20 percent two years ago.

Of course, you can pick different stats to prove pretty much anything when it comes to the web.

Using W3 counter it could be IE, it could be Safari, it could be Firefox.

But recently both Google and Apple have thrown down the gauntlet with respect to requests by the DoJ. Microsoft could very well be taking a different tack; having your browsing routed through TOR makes it harder to know the contents - until you upload it to "the Cloud" and it sits on the servers unencrypted.

Unleash the "Microsoft is in bed with the NSA" hounds.

7 hours ago
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CEO of Spyware Maker Arrested For Enabling Stalkers

BarbaraHudson Re: feminists controll the law! (119 comments)

Men shall be punished, for existing!

No idiot they are punished for stalking.

Let me fix that for you:

No, idiots are punished for stalking.

People of both sexes lose it and stalk their bosses, their co-workers, family members, classmates and teachers, the clerk working at the local store ... makes no difference what gender or sex the stalker or stalkee are - the stalker is an idiot. Anyone who buys this crap is an idiot. And no, being a "helicopter parent" isn't an exception.

7 hours ago
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New Research Casts Doubt On the "10,000 Hour Rule" of Expertise

BarbaraHudson Re:So many practice doing it wrong (112 comments)

That's why there's a difference between 20 years experience and 1 yar experience repeated 20 times. Too bad that escapes too many (hr in particular)

9 hours ago
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New Research Casts Doubt On the "10,000 Hour Rule" of Expertise

BarbaraHudson Re:The difference between skill and talent (112 comments)

You can train a skill, but you cannot learn talent.

And Justin Bieber is proof that a lack of both doesn't correlate with success.

9 hours ago
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Facebook's Atlas: the Platform For Advertisers To Track Your Movements

BarbaraHudson Re: adblock plus (68 comments)

Why not just go to their site. Or if you install it, you can look at the list of "nice rules".

Today's list is here. Just look for all lines starting with an exclamation mark - they'll tell you the intent of the following lines.

Of course, you're free to edit it to your preferences and restart the browser.

9 hours ago
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When Everything Works Like Your Cell Phone

BarbaraHudson Re:Programmed obsolescence? (169 comments)

The article was about the trend to not owning stuff, that can be obsoleted by the "real owners" at a whim, because you no longer own it. I made a comparison to cars (because everyone likes car analogies). But it's just an analogy. Push any analogy too far and it breaks. Does that mean we should stop making analogies? No. They're useful for looking at similar situations.

Even consumer car loans, where you own the vehicle but it secures the lien, can have all sorts of restrictions on what you do with the car because they make the security of the loan less secure. Some say you can't use it for commercial service, some say you can't leave the state or country without prior notification, etc.

Would you rather own or lease the OS that came on your computer? "Oh, we no longer support that version, so we upgraded it remotely as per the lease contract. Oh, and the upgrade won't run SimCity, SimCity2K, SimCity300 Unlimited, etc."

9 hours ago
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When Everything Works Like Your Cell Phone

BarbaraHudson Re:Programmed obsolescence? (169 comments)

But the reality is the same - even if you lose the phone, you're still stuck with the contract payments. You can pay the early termination fee, or pay the full price for a new phone. What are you going to do? If you owned the phone outright, you don't have to pay the "rest of the phone" and you'd be on a cheaper month-by-month plan, with no "early termination fee." Losing your phone sucks, Losing while you still owe on the contract sucks even more.

10 hours ago
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Former GM Product Czar: Tesla a "Fringe Brand"

BarbaraHudson Re:Bob's smokin' crack (224 comments)

The Volt isn't an electric car. It's maximum range on batteries is 38 miles. So, as an electric vehicle, it's 19 miles going, 19 miles return, and if you need headlights and wipers be prepared to get out and push it at the end.

Apples and Oranges ...

10 hours ago
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Google To Require As Many As 20 of Its Apps Preinstalled On Android Devices

BarbaraHudson Re:Why all the separate PLAY apps? (313 comments)

Think of them as shortcuts to just the section you want - though of course the real reason is marketing Google Plays' various sections.

12 hours ago
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Google To Require As Many As 20 of Its Apps Preinstalled On Android Devices

BarbaraHudson Re:Why preinstall? (313 comments)

What's the benefit of baking all these apps into the system partition? I've found that even after an OTA update, most have been replaced by newer versions in the data partition within a few weeks.

... because you won't receive a notification that you can update a non-existent app. As long as I can remove what I don't want and install what I want, what's the big deal? For example, I don't use Google Music, but it's only taking up 14 meg, so I'll just leave it installed. If you're worried about space issues, take the plunge and delete something useless like the Facebook apps. Unless, of course, you like Facebook.

My point is that most phones come with a decent amount of storage, and one 20-second cat video can eat up more than a lot of apps do. Critics (esp. Apple fanbois) have been going "Android fragmentation yadda yadda yadda" and now Google is addressing the issue. Minimum specs for the latest and greatest makes sense, and once consumers get used to it, they'll know that a device that comes with a certain version of the OS meets at least the minimum specs for that OS.

12 hours ago
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Microsoft On US Immigration: It's Our Way Or the Canadian Highway

BarbaraHudson Re:Fine! (363 comments)

In the beginning an OS was the least expensive part of the equation - anything under $100 was no big deal when the basic box, monochrome monitor, 4k, 16k, or even 64k of ram, keyboard, and one 5-1/4" floppy would set you back thousands of dollars. 640k? Dream on. These were not PCs.

Before the PC, there was no shortage of operating systems. For example, CP/M ran on over 3,000 types of machine and those machines were already on a downward spiral in terms of price/features. Other OSes were available as well. The ability to switch computer manufacturers and "maintain software compatibility" wasn't a big deal when you had all sorts of computers being used in homes and offices. Home users were using pretty much everything under the sun, businesses were using Xenix, custom systems written in BASIC, whatever worked. The lack of a common OS didn't stop these machines from proliferating.

Even after the intro of the PC, people kept buying other systems. McDonalds used TRS-80 model 100s in their franchise kitchens, TV stations used Microware OS9 for various stuff, Amigas were favoured by people looking to print up fliers and stuff because, when Apple finally released a GUI, the computer (the Lisa) was just too darned expensive at $9,999.00. The same problem with the Mac when it came out at "only" $1,995 (quickly raised to $2,495). Or you could buy a Color Computer Model 1 for even less - and people did. The CoCo 2 and 3 were both able to run Microware OS9, a very memory-efficient multi-tasking environment with multiple terminals on each text screen in 64k, (and multiple graphic screens, on the Coco 3 in 128k). And you could even run Microsoft Flight Simulator on the Coco3.

People really didn't give a damn about the OS. It was "whatever ran what I wanted to run," and there was plenty of software available for all these different systems. It was the declining price of hardware that put a computer in every home. The original PC, adjusted for inflation, would cost more than a small car. Simply too expensive to put in every home.

12 hours ago
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Ask Slashdot: Software Issue Tracking Transparency - Good Or Bad?

BarbaraHudson Re:Listen to Sales - as hard as it may be (156 comments)

It seems like the sales team in question is letting the other side describe the product and set the tone for how it is viewed in the market rather than they themselves doing that. That seems to me like a major sales force failure.

Exactly this!

So, I think there should be an effort to educate the sales and marketing staff and to convince them to sell the product with the open tracking of defects as a huge asset, rather than liability. Challenge competitors to have the balls to do the same or call them on not doing it and cast aspersions on their product based on their fear of exposing their actual issues.

But don't be surprised if the sales and marketing force or the management behind them aren't willing to expend the effort. Many companies work hard at managing themselves in a race towards the bottom. Then they wonder why things get worse as they make changes....

How much you want to bet that some of the people who are against the whole thing haven't even looked at the bug tracker in question? Ignorance leaves people prone to FUD, even that generated in their own minds.

BTW, you were logged in :-)

yesterday
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Yes, SimCity 2k is beatable.

BarbaraHudson Re:Is that the only beatable one? (5 comments)

The SC2K versions were dos and Win 3x. You can use a command-line option to make dosbox work by, for example, just doubling every pixel, in which case it runs in a 1280x960 window pretty decently. It's a lot quicker to do pixel doubling than it is to scale a 4x3 aspect ratio ot a 16x9 full-screen, which coincidentally might free up some cpu for the sound. Note that I corrected an error in the main article, and added a correction and a lot more info on how to set the initial world for winning conditions here.

The initial size of a city block is 8x8 tiles, with roads all around, not 9x9 tiles.

There is exactly enough room, given the instructions, to lay out an optimal highway coverage as well. And once I get it running again in dosbox, I'll give the optimal layout for the public utilities (fire, police, hospital, school), which is a big deal. With the optimal layout, you're not wasting resources having to cover gaps. Saves money - oops, simoleans.

Oh, and btw, the exodus from the planet begins before you cover every single tile with an arcology.

yesterday
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I'm back.

BarbaraHudson Re:/. users? Your sockpuppets? (39 comments)

It got a laugh, especially since all the other women have been telling me I don't look like I need to lose weight. But I can read a BMI chart as well as the next person, and besides, I just felt better when I wasn't carrying around those 12 extra pounds.

It's like I told the cashier, "This is the first time I haven't stocked up on Chapman's Ice Cream when it's on sale, because every time I do, I end up regretting it (me pinches waist). Today I'm skipping it - and I haven't even gotten out of the store and I regret it already." Everyone who has an extra 5 - 10 pounds "gets it."

The ice cream messes up my sugar balance (type 1 diabetes, oh well) and makes me want to EAT like crazy for a day or two after. So it's not even the ice cream itself, but everything else that suddenly starts shouting "eat me, eat me!" By not buying the ice cream, I'm just saying "Bite me!"

As for my personal troll, he didn't do any harm to me, just to himself. So, "no harm, no foul." If he thought that all the attention he was drawing to my personal situation might embarrass me, he's simply wrong. If TV cameras were to show up tomorrow and interview me about what it's like to be an transsexual, I would take this as just another opportunity to "pay it forward," to educate people, simply out of appreciation for what all the women like me have done to make life better for us.

Because it's not like it's all that easy, because there is still a huge amount of ignorance out there, unlike for the rest of the LGBT.

yesterday
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Facebook's Atlas: the Platform For Advertisers To Track Your Movements

BarbaraHudson Re: adblock plus (68 comments)

The default for AdBlock Plus is to allow some of the well-behaved ads through, so that users who like to support their favourite sites can do so in an unobtrusive way. It's easy to change - there's a checkbox on the dialog when you click on Filter Preferences to allow / disallow this. It's a reasonable compromise, and if everyone used this to only allow ads that don't behave badly, advertisers and their ad distribution networks would have to make their ads behave better.

Blocking all ads, on the other hand, gives them no incentive to change.

yesterday
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When Everything Works Like Your Cell Phone

BarbaraHudson Re:Programmed obsolescence? (169 comments)

Your saying it doesn't make it so. The "bashing" I originally did on car leases was on car leases specifically, not on financing in general. That I started with leasing (one form of financing) doesn't mean what you claim - that I somehow lied when I said leasing was the problem, and not financing in general. Leasing is a subset of financing, same as mortgages. The problem isn't leases, the problem isn't financing in general - it's that people don't want to pay full price for their phone up front, so instead of buying a $200 android outright, they buy a $600 iphone with a contract and pay it out over several years. And they're shocked when it's going to cost them the full price to replace the phone if they lose or break it ("but I only paid $100 for it with this contract. Why can't I have another one for $100?).

I compared car leases to the phone contracts, and both have restrictions that limit what you can do with them - one such restriction being (depending on the lease) the ability to move it out of the country, so it's not just "My only obligation is to restore any mods I did." Just google for it. The same applies to restrictions on some type of private vehicle loans. You can't always do "anything you want" until the vehicle is paid in full.

For another example of how you don't get it, look at how you said that "If you own the car you are likely as much or more upside down than if you have leased it." How stupid. If you either leased or otherwise financed the car, you don't own it outright (which is another way of saying you don't own it, period).

And bringing in the government's ability to seize a TV for back taxes - if you owe money, anyone can seize your TV, subject to limitations of the law. There's nothing special about a debt owed to government that gives only them the power to seize.

Really, why all the bad arguments? Taking lessons from APK?

yesterday

Submissions

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Blackberry abandonning phone market.

BarbaraHudson BarbaraHudson writes  |  about a month and a half ago

BarbaraHudson (3785311) writes "Now that Crackberries are more likely to be referred to as dingleberries, the CBC is reporting that Blackberry has made preparations to abandon the phone market. Blackberry has created Blackberry Technology Solutions

The unit ... includes QNX, the company that BlackBerry acquired and used to develop the operating system that became the platform for its new smartphones, and Certicom, a former independent Toronto-area company with advanced security software.

BTS will also include BlackBerry's Project Ion, which is an application platform focused on machine-to-machine Internet technology, Paratek antenna tuning technology and about 44,000 patents.

When you have less market share than Windows Phone, it's time to throw in the towel ... or as they say in the new "lets not admit we screwed up" venacular, "pivot to take advantage of new opportunities." Yet another tech company brought down by CEOs who rested to long on their laurels."

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Remote "kill switch" coming for Android

BarbaraHudson BarbaraHudson writes  |  about a month and a half ago

BarbaraHudson (3785311) writes "All you iOS users can start howling about how Android is now copying yet another feature — the ability to brick a stolen phone remotely. Remember, though, this is something the feds are looking to make mandatory for all phones, so while it's about time, it's not an attempt to match the iPhone feature-for-feature."
Link to Original Source

Journals

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Yes, SimCity 2k is beatable.

BarbaraHudson BarbaraHudson writes  |  yesterday

While looking around for a minecraft clone so I could see what the hype was about, I came across something called Dwarf Fortress. The New Yorker describes it as SimCity's evil twin.

And some games werenâ(TM)t allowed in at all. These gamesâ"most notably the immensely popular SimCity, as well as its lunatic homemade successor Dwarf Fortressâ"were deemed âoetoo complex or too time consuming,â and are represented only by noninteractive video displays. This is about as satisfying as looking at pictures of food, but it is also in a perverse sort of way a real tribute: these games are still too big, too stubbornly new and strange and mysterious, to fit into a museum just yet. They canâ(TM)t be sampled; you must surrender to them.

Designed by Will Wright, who had made only a single previous game, and first released in 1989, SimCity casts the player as a slightly supernatural city planner, laying out roads and power plants and building zones in a simple, brightly colored interface with a distinct resemblance to MS Paint. You choose tax rates and ordinances from a series of menus, and try to balance traffic and property values and pollution and dozens of other factors on the way to creating a successful cityâ"with the definition of âoesuccessfulâ rather up in the air. It has no âoeend,â no plot, no set goal: you play until you are bored, or until your city seems to you to be perfect or maimed beyond repair. Along with its increasingly pretty and complex sequels (the 1994 SimCity 2000 is the one chosen for âoeApplied Design,â

This canard still persists today. I know it can be beaten - I did it, and it's simpler than I thought.

First - the background. Back when my retinas were getting lasered on a regular basis, I would fire up SK2k in an emulator under KNOPPIX. This gave me a chance to focus on large graphics on a large screen, instead of stuff like fonts. It worked too - my eyes would recover after a few days of intermittent gameplay.

So, since SC2K had always held a certain fascination for me, I determined to beat it. Without bothering with complications like variable tax rates for different industries, etc.

It turns out that the real limiting factor is good old H20. Starting with a flat world and enough water available in rows in the center, you never have to add any more water. Why in rows? Because your pumps benefit from having water on 6 of the 8 adjacent tiles, giving them the best space/capacity trade-off. Why in the center? Because you'll put your industries along the edge, so half (or more near a corner) of your pollution goes to your neighbors, instead of spoiling your water supply.

You do NOT need a seaport. Ever. Or a marina. And you can ignore most of those "Commerce needs new connections" messages.

The optimal grid is 9x9, surrounded by roads on all sides. Continue this pattern, even through the water area (a grid of 9x9 blocks of 9x9), surrounded by a ring of 9x9 blocks for commercial / sports development later in the game. Leave enough of a gap for a set of highways to go from one edge of the screen to the other (forming a huge # sign), by working from the edge to create more 9x9 blocks.

DON'T draw all the roads right away - just lay them out as you need them, otherwise you'll go broke.

If you build police departments, fire departments, schools, etc. as required, you will eventually "break the simulator" Turns out (it's in the docs) that there are only 150 "mini simulators" in the game. You'll know when you're broken this because the next launch arcology will fill up immediately. Do this a few times, and you can start eliminating public utitilies, schools, etc., to increase revenue even more.

Once you have built and populated enough launch arcologies, you'll get the "The exodus has begun" dialog. Game over.

It took me 24 hours, going from 1900 to 26-something. I took a load of screen-shots, to document progress, and saved the game almost every "year", just in case that last run hadn't worked, but it DID!

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We've gone past "good enough" computing ...

BarbaraHudson BarbaraHudson writes  |  about a week ago

Time was when most of us were complaining about needing more ram, more cpu, more storage. Today? Computers are cheap, fast, multi-core, more energy-efficient than ever, with more storage than many of us will ever use ... and by the time we fill up those huge hard disks, we'll just buy a newer, faster computer with several times the storage and even more ram for less.

And if that's not enough, there's online storage. It's not just Linus Torvalds who can say "Only wimps use tape backup: real men just upload their important stuff on ftp, and let the rest of the world mirror it." Everyone does it - even when they really shouldn't.

"Fast, good, cheap - pick two?" Not any more. For most users and use cases, we really can have it all, literally right in the palm of our hand if that's what we want. Sure, a lot of the old skills that were needed when hardware sucked are now obsolete, but I for one don't miss those days. Not when I can concentrate on doing what I want instead.

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I'm dismayed at how many of the old gang are gone ...

BarbaraHudson BarbaraHudson writes  |  about a week ago

I took another poster's advice and went through my two dormant accounts and friended a bunch of my old friends. But looking at the date many of them made their last post or last journal entry, it looks like many of them are gone, probably for good.

On another note, I simply don't have time to read, never mind respond to, AC posts any more. I know how disappointed that will make a certain individual (and everyone else will be going YAY!!!! FINALLY!!!! :-)

So what's next? All I can say is that I guarantee it will probably be more interesting than anything I've journaled about so far. I just haven't quite decided where to start, because it's a bit more complicated than anything else I've written about to date.

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Victims of technological change - why haters gotta hate.

BarbaraHudson BarbaraHudson writes  |  about a week ago

Curiosity works for a lot of us. We're willing to turn aside from the tools that work for us for a bit, even build up some technical debt in our area of expertise, to explore some new technology that might in the long run prove beneficial, or at least interesting (and if you're a curious person, poking around stuff that's interesting is FUN).

And yet, we probably all have areas where we're a bit of an iconoclast. And technology is littered with people who just refused to accept change, and became irrelevant. We don't code everything in assembler, or c, or c++. Even I use java (gasp) on occasion. But what happens when the computing environment becomes so user-centric (a GOOD THING) that people are free to choose what works for them without having to seek the advice of self-anointed gurus whose advice is no longer relevant?

We should ask ourselves why "haters gotta hate"

Sometimes those "gurus" fail to move on, becoming more shrill with every passing year. It's a personal thing for them - they cling to what used to work because that's all they have. They become trollish, haters, because if they're forced to realize that their life's work is now worthless, what will they have left? What WILL they do? They know in the back of their mind that they're too far behind to catch up, so this fear drives them to become even more rigid in their views.

Which brings us to Alexander P Kowolski, the HOSTS file troll.

Here's a guy who posts up to 100 anonymous responses a day, going through my posting history to crap-flood every discussion. I think this response sums up the problem pretty well, at least from my perspective:

Well, since you FINALLY asked how you are absurd:

1st definition of absurd from google: Ab-surd: (of a person or a person's behavior or actions) foolish; unreasonable.

Going through every post I make in every thread, posting multiple responses (up to 100 posts a day) attacking me based on my gender (including in a thread about sexual harassment) - I think that most people would qualify your behaviour as both foolish and unreasonable.

Getting all bent out of shape when someone exposes your bullying tactics and then tells other people how to do the same to you - both your original bullying and your response when you get it thrown right back at you are foolish, unreasonable, and just plain childish.

Saying I'm stalking you when it's obvious you're the one doing the stalking - foolish, unreasonable, and more than a bit delusional. Oh, and your paranoia is showing.

Thinking that attacking me because I'm transsexual is going to get you anywhere on a tech site, when tech attracts a higher-than-average number of people in the LGBT community, as well as sympathizers, is foolish. Continuing it day after day when it doesn't work is not just unreasonable, it's stupid and/or insane.

Clinging to arguments for your HOSTS file that are completely orthogonal to today's reality, and that obviously the vast majority don't care about and don't need because they have found better ways to solve their own problems, is foolish on it's face and unreasonable to those looking on, who use their computers just fine without your "solution."

Going on about how "taking estrogen is rotting your brain", that "you're crazy to have cut your balls off" (btw - I'm not a surgeon, and I don't pretend to be one on the innnertubes), when I'm following expert medical advice that has a proven track record of success, well, that's both foolish and ridiculous.

The problem isn't your hosts file - it's your behaviour, which certainly is absurd, and probably disturbed as well.

That leads to another question - why? What is it about me in particular that sets you off worse than anyone else? Is it me, or do you have a problem with women in general (I seem to recall some attacks you made on other women who have challenged you that would indicate that this may be the case)? Do you think that men are superior to women, and that anyone who willingly "trades in" to become a woman is stupid because you have a low opinion of women?

And that, of course, brings us back on-topic - the "science has a sexual assault problem". You don't seem to be capable of the introspection necessary to realize how absurd your behaviour is. How many other women have you felt it's your right to attack, and still continue years later, about their sex, gender, or sexual identity, just because you disagreed with their opinion on a technical issue of absolutely no import to anyone but you?

He has time and again failed to realize that people who use alternatives that work for them, such as adblock, don't give a damn about his stupid hosts file and the supposed benefits. It's THEIR computer, and they're free to use what works for them - and it's NOT going to be his HOSTS file. And crap-flooding discussions with challenges to enter some useless "pissing contest" of the benefits of one over the other is irrelevant to pretty much everyone except him. So why do it? Perhaps because he is so psychologically invested in his world view that any alternative is just too scary.

So why "feed the troll" by posting a journal entry about him?

That's a valid question, for sure. But if you see him as a victim of technological change instead of just a troll, it might help put some of the other "wars" on slashdot into perspective. We get comfortable with our niche, change happens, and we have to, once again, learn a whole new slew of technologies. The prospect can be daunting, sometimes it's just a feeling of "oh heck, here we go again, change for the sake of change yadda yadda yadda ...", and it's easier to say "I'm just going to stick with what works" ... until one day we wake up and realize we're in danger of becoming totally irrelevant.

It can happen to any of us. Did it happen to APK? Or was he always like this? I don't know, and I don't really care. Either way, the lessons to be learned are the same. Haters gotta hate, because if you take that away from them, they have nothing to fall back on. They are more to be pitied, same as many of the opponents of same-sex marriage, now that they can't bolster their own sense of self-worth by hating gays and lesbians, are feeling a bit lost.

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I'm back.

BarbaraHudson BarbaraHudson writes  |  about two weeks ago

I can see well enough to use a computer again, which came as a welcome surprise. Huge thanks to the retinal surgeons who patched my left eye back into some semblance of working order, and to the work over the last several years by the team of ophthalmologists and tech assistants who helped preserve much of the sight in my right eye.

It's been an interesting experience so far, and one that I have learned a lot from. I've been told that the betting money would be on my retinas being relatively stable for the next two-three years, though the vitrectomy was such an insult to the lens that I can expect to need it to be replaced in the next year or so.

The more things change, the more they stay the same ... especially here on /., where APK wasted no time claiming that various anonymous posters were me. Comments like this one must be driving him even nuttier - will he be accusing that poster of being me?

Only on slashdot :-)

Unfortunately, I never expected to use a computer again, so I don't have the passwords to my old accounts (neither my original one, nor the one I created with a gender-appropriate nic after I was outed as a transsexual). I'm sorry for the inconvenience. Just like I'm sorry that I wasn't able to keep people up to date before falling off the face of the net.

There are still plenty of challenges ahead, both near-term and long-term. And plenty of unanswered questions that I will do my best to clear up. I was going to do it elsewhere and just post links, but really, this is home (despite the beta crap).

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