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How Apple's Billion Dollar Sapphire Bet Will Pay Off

BasilBrush Re:Transparent aluminum (187 comments)

Apple already uses transparent aluminium on their MacBook Pro cased for where the power LED is.

(Well it's actually a line of laser cut holes, so small you have to look very closely to see them - until the light comes on.)

5 hours ago
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How Apple's Billion Dollar Sapphire Bet Will Pay Off

BasilBrush Re:Well. (187 comments)

I can't believe the "dimmer" argument has an real validity given that sapphire is widely used for camera lenses, where any significant dimming would be a problem.

5 hours ago
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How Apple's Billion Dollar Sapphire Bet Will Pay Off

BasilBrush Re:Well. (187 comments)

No, Sapphire is certainly stronger than Gorilla Glass. It's the next best thing to diamond. That's the reason it's pretty unscratchable. And that's why it's used for lenses and watch glasses.

Sapphire may be more brittle than Gorilla Glass. But that's a different thing.

5 hours ago
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How Silk Road Bounced Back From Its Multimillion-Dollar Hack

BasilBrush Re:Trustworthy is the name of the game (44 comments)

That guy sitting in the oval office is Barack Obama. We know quite a lot about him. We even have his birth cert!

Now who is that person trading as "The Silk Road"? And where is he?

5 hours ago
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How Silk Road Bounced Back From Its Multimillion-Dollar Hack

BasilBrush Re:A fool and their money... (44 comments)

understand what a free society truely looks like (except for those that have been to Burning Man).

Burning man is a festival and a holiday. It's not a free society.

The reality of this free-as-in-libre currency Bitcon appears to be that people are ripping other people off left right and centre.

5 hours ago
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You Can Now Run Beta Versions of OS X—For Free

BasilBrush Re:beta tester now? (168 comments)

For sure it's more memory hungry. I'm considering upgrading my 4GB to 8GB.

6 hours ago
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You Can Now Run Beta Versions of OS X—For Free

BasilBrush Re:WANT! (168 comments)

Until running cat on a large text file doesn't crash the terminal (blowing up all open terminals)

How big?

built-in PDF viewer doesn't hang the OS for ~1s sometimes when scrolling through a static PDF (provoking the spinny color thing of doom)

Haven't noticed that either. Is that another huge file thing?

6 hours ago
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You Can Now Run Beta Versions of OS X—For Free

BasilBrush Re:PC Release !! (168 comments)

Why would they want to release their free-of-charge OS onto other PCs, when the money that's used to develop OSX comes from selling Macs?

Besides, licensing MacOS for other computers was one of the mistakes Apple was making in the years before Jobs came back. When they were heading towards bankruptcy. They won't be repeating that mistake.

These days you can't even say that Apple should follow Microsoft's model, as Windows is on it's way out.

6 hours ago
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You Can Now Run Beta Versions of OS X—For Free

BasilBrush Re:beta tester now? (168 comments)

What's not stable about Mavericks? (10.9)

6 hours ago
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You Can Now Run Beta Versions of OS X—For Free

BasilBrush Re:Toot little too late (168 comments)

Look at your own quote of the preceeding conversation. The profit margin answer is to the question "Where is Apple's future? It seems to be slowly eating itself". It's proof that Apple's business model is working very well for them, and they aren't going to go out of business anywhere in the foreseeable future.

6 hours ago
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You Can Now Run Beta Versions of OS X—For Free

BasilBrush Re:Toot little too late (168 comments)

Apple's earning releases show their own profits, but not those of the other companies in the industry, so unless they happen to have made a comment in the notes, they are not likely to answer this question. Which is why you need an industry analyst, such as the one The Register has quoted.

6 hours ago
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'The Door Problem' of Game Design

BasilBrush Re:Will the door have windows? (252 comments)

It's funny. In he intervening years, text adventure authoring has come a long way. It's now possible to create games in a near English functional programming language.
http://inform7.com/

BUT the games compile down to the age old Infocom game file format, and so are limited to the ancient concepts of wandering between rooms and manipulating objects. And whilst the range of user input that can be understood has expanded, it's still just combinations of "verbing" and "object" or moving by compass directions.

Still, some authors have managed to be creative even within this limited game engine, and create games that don't APPEAR to be simple rooms and objects games.

I wonder, would a truly unlimited interactive novel be fun to play? It could be tested out by a kind of Turing test scenario. Have a player play such a game, and have a real novelist provide the "game" text. Of course such a thing would entail the player waiting a considerable time between "moves". But it would mean that their input would be boundless, they could do anything in the "game".

Considering how hard it is for most authors to get things published and make a living whilst they are writing, this might even be a feasible real way of gaming, allowing authors to make a small income whilst doing their chosen activity. Though it would need to be a pay-per-move system.

6 hours ago
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'The Door Problem' of Game Design

BasilBrush Re:Will the door have windows? (252 comments)

I don't think so. What makes a good simulation of real life doesn't tend to make for a good game. Real life is mostly boring, which is why people turn to games in the first place.

There are categories where maximum reality is desirable, but they tend to have "simulator" in the name. Flight Sim, Formula One Sim, Train Sim, Theme Park Sim.

But what people usually want in games is problems to solve, and/or skills to develop, to make progress, all at a level that tests their ability at nearly all times, but doesn't overcome them. And trying to be more realistic only limits the amount to which you can do these things.

Take the article's example of a door, and the question of how you can tell if it's a locked door or not. In reality, you can't tell whether a door is locked without trying to turn the handle and push it. But in games it's usually better if you can tell by looking whether a door is unlocked and openable. There are plenty of games that go for the reality route, and you have to try to open all the doors to find the openable ones. And it's a tedious task that rarely adds anything to the gameplay.

Another example is the concept of health levels, multiple lives, and re-spawning. Remember the US army created a game of their own called "America's Army". It was as realistic as the could make it, including the fact that you get shot once, and you are dead, and you couldn't rejoin the multi-player game until it was over. And that made it a dull game, as you typically spent half the time waiting rather than playing.

As you say, you like Metroid (I guess Metroid Prime?) which was far from realistic. But yes, a great game.

7 hours ago
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Face Recognition Algorithm Finally Outperforms Humans

BasilBrush Re:Ok great... (60 comments)

Now where can we get it... Or purchase it.
Is it patented, is it Open Source.
Where is the link to the actual algorithm.

The second link is to the article. It's available as a PDF. Only use it for good.

7 hours ago
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Face Recognition Algorithm Finally Outperforms Humans

BasilBrush Re:I really doubt it does... (60 comments)

For sure, disguises to baffle algorithms differ from disguises to baffle humans. Here's a web site about disguises to baffle facial recognition systems. Probably not something anyone would want to wear outside a fashion event or a political demo, but interesting anyway.
http://cvdazzle.com/

7 hours ago
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Face Recognition Algorithm Finally Outperforms Humans

BasilBrush Re:Marketing... (60 comments)

But Human's don't match faces based on the entire population either. Just on the faces they know.

I don't know how many people the average person can recognise, but my guess is that it will be less than 13,000.

This anthropologist seems to have worked in this area, and he puts the number of people you can recognise and put a name to as 1500. (You'll recognise more than that, but you won't have names to go with them.)
http://spectrum.ieee.org/telec...

7 hours ago
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Will the Nissan Leaf Take On the Tesla Model S At Half the Price?

BasilBrush Re:Oh noes, I can't drive X miles (370 comments)

You're way off. The average person doing an average walking pace would take about 35-40 mins to do 2 miles. 30 mins at a brisk walking pace. 15 mins would be walking-race speed, and far beyond most people.

"Specific studies have found pedestrian walking speeds ranging from 4.51 kilometres per hour (2.80 mph) to 4.75 kilometres per hour (2.95 mph) for older individuals and from 5.32 kilometres per hour (3.31 mph) to 5.43 kilometres per hour (3.37 mph) for younger individuals;[3][4] a brisk walking speed can be around 6.5 kilometres per hour (4.0 mph).[5] Champion racewalkers can average more than 14 kilometres per hour (8.7 mph) over a distance of 20 kilometres (12 mi). An average human child achieves independent walking ability at around 11 months old.[6]"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W...

yesterday

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