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New Research Casts Doubt On the "10,000 Hour Rule" of Expertise

Bite The Pillow Re:Gladwell (159 comments)

If you practice anything wrong, you won't get better. If you spend 10,000 hours just doing something and not getting better, it isn't practice.

That's not a circular argument - it's two different things.

Someone with talent may need to put in less than 10,000 hours. Someone with little talent may need 15,000 hours. There's no magic number unless you distill out a lot of detail.

But, if you have absolutely no sense for what you're doing, you can't practice on your own and get better. Innate talent implies that you can recognize what you are doing wrong, or can figure out ways to get better. Without talent, you need some guidance.

And public school electives are a terrible place for someone to get the kind of guidance needed to turn repetitive motions into the kind of practice that makes you better. "No amount of practice" was probably a simple way of saying "I can't give you enough time so you're on your own, and also I'm stupid."

Also, the singular of anecdote is not a counterargument.

yesterday
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New Research Casts Doubt On the "10,000 Hour Rule" of Expertise

Bite The Pillow Re:In my experience most mastery is at the start (159 comments)

Last thing I read was a fairly even age distribution, including both young genius and a gradual peak into old age.

I'm not going to bother finding a citation. You go first.

yesterday
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FCC To Rule On "Paid Prioritization" Deals By Internet Service Providers

Bite The Pillow Re: "You don't like our Internet . . . ?" (125 comments)

I think we need to build our own government, and outlaw bribery

Without bribery, how do politicians know which constituents to support? The ones who can take off work to travel to DC for a personal meeting? The ones who can afford to donate to a political campaign to support the person they think is most qualified? Or do you get an "I voted for..." placard that gives you the right to a 5-minute audience?

Which bribery are you referring to? And after it is outlawed, how have you prevented anyone from spending money for access, even if it doesn't go to the candidate?

Do we tell the boards of directors of public companies that they can't hire government officials once they leave office? How does that affect private companies? and which public official would guarantee they are jobless once their political career ends?

It's a nice sound bite, in other words, but it's meaningless. Removing all bribery is impossible, and once you achieve that there are too many loopholes and side avenues that no one would consider illegal - just advantageous to the same people who can afford bribery.

So I'm going to need for you to be really specific on what exactly you meant.

yesterday
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FCC To Rule On "Paid Prioritization" Deals By Internet Service Providers

Bite The Pillow Re:So. (125 comments)

We did "vote for the a candidate who will push for net neutrality". Pre-election, Obama was for neutrality. The following quote says it has not changed, at least as of August 5, 2014.

One of the issues around net neutrality is whether you are creating different rates or charges for different content providers. That's the big controversy here. So you have big, wealthy media companies who might be willing to pay more and also charge more for spectrum, more bandwidth on the Internet so they can stream movies faster. I personally, the position of my administration, as well as a lot of the companies here, is that you donâ(TM)t want to start getting a differentiation in how accessible the Internet is to different users. You want to leave it open so the next Google and the next Facebook can succeed.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

So, we did what you said. 3.7 million out of 211 million is not a significant gauge of public opinion, but it shouldn't matter, because we voted for the right guy.

Are you going to change your statement to emphasize the word "push", as if they have to actively work on the issue? And then further clarify a chain of command where people have to listen to the President's opinion? Your logic checks out, but facts are lacking.

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: Software Issue Tracking Transparency - Good Or Bad?

Bite The Pillow Re:Listen to Sales - as hard as it may be (157 comments)

This had been appreciated by our support and developer community

Then make it available to the support and developer community.

which was time consuming to produce and I decided was unnecessary given we could just expose the "truth" with simple links to the Bugzilla search related to that milestone.

The sales and marketing team didn't like this.

If I buy your software, I don't expect to weed through that time consuming mess and figure out what changed. Multiply the amount of time it takes you to produce by the number of individual customers (not seats, just count one per purchasing entity). Divide by two because they are reading, not writing. That's how much time you could save each one of those by making the list again.

S&M may miss the sanitized lists, and are just playing hardball trying to get them back. Ask them about a compromise where your developers, who need this information, can have it, and the non-developers can have a sanitized list with the important bits.

More importantly, in this case you have to think of what's good for the business, and not your personal philosophies. Mostly because ignorance is more common than understanding, and converting people is hard. In a commercial enterprise, you can't give up control of the message - and that's exactly what you are doing by exposing everything.

You are thinking about customers, but S&M has to think about everyone else. And, retaining current customers. Hopefully thinking about it like this gives you the perspective you need to realize that what is best for your use case does not necessarily say what's best for the company.

2 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: Software Issue Tracking Transparency - Good Or Bad?

Bite The Pillow Re:Advertise it as a positive thing (157 comments)

you could counter the effect with your own marketing

Whose own marketing? The poster's marketing team?

The sales and marketing team didn't like this. Their argument is that competitors use this against us to paint us as producers of buggy software

Marketing is not on board with this idea. You already quoted that to start out your reply. Sales and marketing see it as an obstacle. You will need some sort of indication that it would be effective in order to even start convincing marketing that they could publicise the thing they are against and have it work out well.

A disastrous marketing campaign hurts the bottom line, so these people aren't going to take the word of optimistic blowhards that it will just work out.

2 days ago
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Utilities Should Worry; Rooftop Solar Could Soon Cut Their Profit

Bite The Pillow Re:Or utilities could take solar more seriously (488 comments)

If you make electricity with renewables, you need a lot of surface area. That's a big burden. But if you can overcome that, you have new transmission lines to build, and new maintenance to buy equipment and train people. If you luck out completely, you may not have new lines.

Then, you have to balance renewables against keeping reserve capacity ready to go. And no cheating here, because all renewables have dips in output. So you buy coal or gas slightly cheaper, but it is more expensive per kWh for traditional fuel.

Still competing with individuals generating their own solar on site, your surcharged solar is not attractive. Sure, people like renters will still pay. Owners will switch if they can. And it keeps getting cheaper to switch.

Now your infrastructure and investment is larger. And more threatened, but necessary for reserve supply.

We can jump straight to magical New revenue stream, but papers like this barely cover the question of how much new revenue might be needed. You can't believe that the industry has no one working on that answer, but after zero consideration a dotslash poster has the answer.

As always, a good idea has details which may render the obvious nearly impossible. Just like the replies about Germany doing solar, these details make a huge difference, but many just parrot the parts that sound good.

3 days ago
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Utilities Should Worry; Rooftop Solar Could Soon Cut Their Profit

Bite The Pillow Re:In Soviet USA (488 comments)

Sane electricity prices would include a base rate for infrastructure and reserve capacity, and a cost per usage. Most people just pay the usage fee. I

It makes sense to me, if I have a PV roof, I still pay a base rate to the electric company to maintain the lines so I can have electricity when my roof is not generating.

You, on the other hand, should see someone about all that irrationality.

3 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: Swift Or Objective-C As New iOS Developer's 1st Language?

Bite The Pillow Re:Obj-C (307 comments)

CLR in this context means a very large standardized library, which is not subject to fragmentation nor availability. It runs or it doesn't, and it behaves as documented (by google or stack overflow, not necessarily MSDN).

You can care about performance and study the IL, or ignore it and use Linq for elegant and readable one liners.

I won't address the remainder, as that is where you professed ignorance. Aside from lightweight, where you made a good point in support despite not understanding.

3 days ago
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The Raid-Proof Hosting Technology Behind 'The Pirate Bay'

Bite The Pillow Re:Good job! (144 comments)

As a content creator, I would prefer spending time creating content.

And, if I sell the rights, like Notch sold minecraft, he would be the only rights enforcer under your plan, and he is only interested in making cool little games. No sale would be possible.

Care to reconsider?

about a week ago
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Mark Zuckerberg Throws Pal Joe Green Under the Tech Immigration Bus

Bite The Pillow Re:Dissolution of the middle class! (260 comments)

First - "Bay Area" means you could be working for any number of really good, or really bad, companies. At least a quarter of them, if named, would immediately bring ridicule. If you then specified website or something else, you would be divided into the stupid or potentially stupid category.

That said, meaning this a different thought based only slightly on that paragraph, many of those are companies where you can't just fire someone. Especially if they present themselves well.

Imagine the court case where you say this otherwise reasonable human being is completely useless where I work. Now, prove it.

about a week ago
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Mark Zuckerberg Throws Pal Joe Green Under the Tech Immigration Bus

Bite The Pillow Re:Critical to the tech community? (260 comments)

How are we supposed to compete with borderline indentured servitude?

Simple - be self employed.

I'll wait for the inevitable answers about how hard it is to start a company, and tax implications, and inability to count on income since it depends on the economy.

But, if you watch something like Shark Tank, you see an endless stream of actual small businesses that are somehow creating a market for a product that don't have any reason to exist - other than there is a market for it. Someone had a product, found a market, and started making money.

That's the American way.

That's how these companies started in the first place. In 1962 Walmart was a single store in Rogers, Arkansas. Exxon-Mobil was a gamble on a new (oil) industry that led to a Supreme Court decision to split Standard Oil into 34 companies. I could go down the Fortune 100 list, but you could do the same.

How do you turn a chain of five-and-dime stores into a world-dominating $400+ billion p.a. super company? Luck, experience, grit, and probably more stuff. How do you decide to turn a produce company into an oil producer? Insanity, I suppose.

Shark Tank shows that business is alive and well. We don't have to work for them - we can compete with them. Not with the H1-B, but with the company itself.

If you can't compete with the company, and you can't compete with the indentured servant, then you must defend this question: In what way other than to the investor class are you valuable?

If you develop software, but not ideas, and I don't develop ideas so I'm in the software part, then how are you valuable as something other than a replaceable part? I specifically reference Heinlein's "Time for the stars", where the irreplaceable are specifically replaceable. A cog in a wheel.

I earn above the median wage because I'm awesome, but I am not among the rich. I'm trying to compete with developers, not with indentured servants. And not with the people who created my job. The latter have my thanks, much as I will complain day to day.

about a week ago
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Mark Zuckerberg Throws Pal Joe Green Under the Tech Immigration Bus

Bite The Pillow Re:What the fuck does the story mean? (260 comments)

I know all of these references, and it still makes no sense. The summary is the responsibility of theodp - the choice of not posting it was up to Timothy.

Blame each accordingly.

about a week ago
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Mark Zuckerberg Throws Pal Joe Green Under the Tech Immigration Bus

Bite The Pillow Re:Mark Zuckerberg is a liar. (260 comments)

Have you read the link in this comment? It suggests that your experience is atypical.

It is also outdated. However, there have been a lot of reports similar to this one, and only a few individuals like you stating the opposite.

Is it remotely possible that you have an above-average experience?

http://politics.slashdot.org/c...

about a week ago
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New MRI Studies Show SSRIs Bring Rapid Changes to Brain Function

Bite The Pillow Re:Interesting (138 comments)

That's a very good point. We know what happens to the chemicals in the brain, and we know that after some time people feel a bit better, and we know that is rarely permanent.

There was a great article in Newsweek or Time (I can't find it now...) that pointed out this delay. The chemicals happen immediately, but it is weeks before any effects are seen.

One idea was that the brain is damaged, and has to be repaired. It didn't make sense, but there are studies that report decreased brain tissue, or ridges, or various measures of physical properties.

I don't remember seeing any follow-up that showed reversal of brain tissue decline, which might prove this idea.

Anyway, I suspect that your sensitivity to stimuli would have made you aware of the chemical differences faster than most people. And it could be possible that the ASD makes you more susceptible to depression - *without* the physical atrophy that may or may not underpin most non-ASD depression. You did not have to endure the brain rebuilding that most people might.

All of this post basically points out that we don't know how the brain works, and if you have multiple differences from the norm maybe we super don't know how it works. If chemicals made you feel better, good. I don't think anyone can really explain why.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Is iOS 8 a Pig?

Bite The Pillow Re:Religion or politics? (504 comments)

This probably isn't the best place to ask about potential issues with a new OS version.

I would have started with an iOS user forum, preferably something official, rather than asking a bunch of tech people who may not have iOS experience at all.

And, the whole thing reads like "I want my Android back, am I the only one who thinks this sucks?"

It was certainly written trollishly, and probably did not belong here without a cursory review of Apple-specific user forums. I vote unintentional troll.

about a week ago
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New MRI Studies Show SSRIs Bring Rapid Changes to Brain Function

Bite The Pillow Re:mostly clarity (138 comments)

That's how it is supposed to work. It's a crutch to allow something like cognitive behavioral therapy to take hold.

Ideally, you would be seeing a psychologist to assist with identifying coping strategies, or problems with the way you filter input. Instead of triggering negative responses, everything you experience in a day should be more or less balanced. Not perfectly 50/50, but certainly not always negative.

Getting in a negative rut ("depression") makes it easier for a neutral stimulus to trigger a negative emotion, or something that should be positive to be misinterpreted.

An anti-depressant can't change the way you react to what you hear, read, or see. But it can give you enough of a lift that you have room to work on yourself.

As long as I'm typing - someone will probably mention cocaine. Similar caveat with cocaine - it doesn't help you change your mind. It actually gives you a positive feeling, which current anti-depressants don't really do. The need to change your mind goes away, temporarily, and users look to another hit to solve the problem. It's a great demonstration of how feeling good might feel, but serves no other useful purpose.

about a week ago
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New "Crescent Bay" VR Headset Revealed and Demo'd At Oculus Connect

Bite The Pillow Re:Slashdot Hate Machine (65 comments)

Sounds like Dagoth Moor Zoological Gardens is out of beta. .

about two weeks ago
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Emails Cast Unflattering Light On Internal Politics of Healthcare.gov Rollout

Bite The Pillow Re:Please describe exactly (391 comments)

I blame republicans for having the idea, but refusing to do anything to help the black man. It's almost like they just watched it burn so they could make great campaign ads about the tragedy.

You seem intent on blaming democrats instead of politicians.

about two weeks ago

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