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How Apple Watch Is Really a Regression In Watchmaking

Bob the Super Hamste Re:How big a fuss is it, really? (379 comments)

Why put in 3 round gears and a differential when one (precisely manufactured) larger gear is "close enough"? Technology does help, but commoditization is the enemy.

Which is truly sad since commoditization could make good things cheaper if mass produced. I want the future promised where stuff doesn't wear out but most people just want a cheaper one. If Lego can mass produce plastic bits that have tolerances of 2 microns then why can't other manufactures of higher end things do so. I mean people are willing to pay more for quality since for toys Legos aren't cheap but are very well made. Even on the secondary market a major selling point of bulk lots is stating that there are no Mega Blocks.

23 minutes ago
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How Apple Watch Is Really a Regression In Watchmaking

Bob the Super Hamste Re:How big a fuss is it, really? (379 comments)

From what I have read about the MIL-3818B watches they are pretty good for accuracy I don't know if mine is exceptional as you point out it is just one data point. In this case it would be best to assume that it represents an average one since it was basically chosen randomly when purchased at the PX. It may very well be an exceptional example given that it has lasted but these were inexpensive (probably government subsidized) but accurate watches for airmen of that era. The original spec stated the maximum error at +-30 seconds a day but unless something is wrong internally they do much better. My biggest issue with mine is that the tritium on the face has decayed (~12 year half life) so much that they really only glow for a brief time after being exposed to light instead of glowing continuously.

If you need precise timing better than 1.5 minutes/month there are better solutions but for regular life that is close enough. Also I travel for work enough that when adjusting it to new time zones I can snap the time to a stratum 1 time server. The watch is very consistent with it's error as well, like I said it runs 3 seconds (+-1 second) fast per day, and since it has the hack function I could manually compensate by stopping the watch for a few seconds each day.

about an hour ago
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How Apple Watch Is Really a Regression In Watchmaking

Bob the Super Hamste Re:How big a fuss is it, really? (379 comments)

And that is why I don't shop at Wal*Mart. Not being a watch guy (I do find the mechanical aspects fascinating though) I didn't know that a reasonable watch would be called a chronometer. I have a number of older nice pocket watches I am going to get repaired but I don't expect them to be as accurate because they are much older and while higher end still have a higher mass and fewer jewels.

1 hour ago
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How Apple Watch Is Really a Regression In Watchmaking

Bob the Super Hamste Re:How big a fuss is it, really? (379 comments)

I find it surprising that as you put it a "modern mechanical (non-chronometer)" watch would be off 5-10 seconds per day given that I own a 49 year old MIL-3818B wrist watch that I had cleaned and repaired a little while ago and from what I can tell it runs pretty consistently 3 seconds (+-1) fast a day when checked against a stratum 1 time source. Granted it is a very good 17 jewel watch (Benrus) but it is almost 50 years old and was my uncle's service watch while in Vietnam so it isn't like it wasn't exposed and probably abused during it's life. I would have thought that watch making would have improved with modern lower friction, lighter weight, and more thermally stable materials. Although given what I see for men's wrist watches it seems they are more jewelry and "look at me" than functional devices.

yesterday
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Cutting the Cord? Time Warner Loses 184,000 TV Subscribers In One Quarter

Bob the Super Hamste Re:TV licence that funds the BBC (372 comments)

Except that was the tax paid to support the BBC and was only paid by those who have a TV (assumed to be everyone). Personally I wouldn't mind that situation if we could produce shows of that quality. I like watching the BBC series on Netflix since while there may not be lots of special effects they are well written.

yesterday
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Cutting the Cord? Time Warner Loses 184,000 TV Subscribers In One Quarter

Bob the Super Hamste Re:They tried to raise prices 20% unnanounced (372 comments)

The other nice thing about not having commercials is not being nagged to buy the latest fad toy that will get used a couple of times and then ignored. Also the kids get less gender stereotyping such as kitchen toys are only for girls and don't get the pressure to not be themselves. Both of my boys like playing kitchen, doing crafts, playing with cars and trucks, and being outside. I did have a good laugh on the first day of kindergarten when my oldest went and started playing with the huge kitchen set the class had and made "breakfast" for all the girls playing house in the class.

yesterday
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Ken Ham's Ark Torpedoed With Charges of Religious Discrimination

Bob the Super Hamste Re:Saw the debate (433 comments)

I don't know if that was an enforced rule or not but I didn't follow it (60/40 blend t-shirts). That was a long time ago and when little I didn't know what most of those things were. As I got older I started thinking for my self and the whole religious thing just didn't make sense to me. After starting to question some things and realizing that it was pretty shitty to think like that I rapidly fell away from it. It was really strange too when I went to church with my grandparents on my father's side (Presbyterian) on the rare occasion I was at their house for the weekend and while their god and Jesus had the same names they were very different from what I was hearing in my regular church. This new Jesus seemed more like a guy who wanted you to not be a dick to other people and help out to make people's lot in life better, not someone who wants you to carry out a crusade for him.

yesterday
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MIT Professor Advocates Ending Asteroid Redirect Mission To Fund Asteroid Survey

Bob the Super Hamste Re:But where are the potentional profits? (107 comments)

Do you know how much you could sell virgin primordial untouched by humans without any terrestrial pollutants water for? This seems like something that you could dupe people into paying at least $10 a liter for.

yesterday
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Drones Could 3D-Map Scores of Hectares of Land In Just a Few Hours

Bob the Super Hamste Re:Farm topography (94 comments)

Isn't there available LIDAR information available for your area?

I while back I was looking at some for one of the areas that I hunt and it was accurate enough where you could see the ruts in the road where vehicles regularly drove down gravel roads. I can't find it at the moment but it was available in an interactive form online.

2 days ago
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Drones Could 3D-Map Scores of Hectares of Land In Just a Few Hours

Bob the Super Hamste Re:LOL ... Scores of Hectares? (94 comments)

But how deep would it have to be to have the volume of a barn megaparsec?

2 days ago
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Ken Ham's Ark Torpedoed With Charges of Religious Discrimination

Bob the Super Hamste Re:why so much money? (433 comments)

Well that is only after the flood. I mean it takes a lot of wood to build a boat that big so where do you think it all went.

2 days ago
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Ken Ham's Ark Torpedoed With Charges of Religious Discrimination

Bob the Super Hamste Re:Saw the debate (433 comments)

From my experience (being raised in a fundamentalist baptist church that was probably different only in actions to the Westboro Baptist Church) it goes deeper than that. These people are so invested in their belief system that if any portion is proven to be wrong it means that it is all wrong. The bible for them is the gold standard of truth and everything in it is of divine origin that speaks with one voice (never understood this). For them religion is their reason for existence and provides all the meaning in their life and they don't want that to be a lie. Unfortunately they use religion to justify all sorts of strange belief like the gays need to die, black people carry the mark of Cain and as such are sub human, the universe is only ~6000 years old, a women must submit to their husband, etc.

2 days ago
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Ken Ham's Ark Torpedoed With Charges of Religious Discrimination

Bob the Super Hamste Re:Saw the debate (433 comments)

Given the age of the stories there may have actually been a flood of almost biblical proportion. Go back to the end of the last ice age and if you had lakes like Lake Missoula emptying it would seem to fit. It isn't like dumping 500 cubic miles of water would go unnoticed if there was a human population near by that happened to survive. It wouldn't surprise me if there were similar events that got passed down by oral tradition to various people in Eurasia. Give the story ~8000 years to morph and for people to hear similar stories from all other tribes and it becomes a global flood.

2 days ago
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Can Ello Legally Promise To Remain Ad-Free?

Bob the Super Hamste No (153 comments)

Nope. the likelihood of them remaining ad free is about the same as not seeing any more Bennett Haselton navel gazing posts about solutions to first world problems.

2 days ago
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Alienware's Triangular Area-51 Re-Design With Tri-SLI GeForce GTX 980, Tested

Bob the Super Hamste Re:What a nice ad... (135 comments)

Do you change your own oil in your car?

Always, as well as most of the other work on the cars.

Make your own peanut butter?

No but I haven't eaten peanut butter in close to 20 years, I do make my own jams though.

Bake your own bread?

Yes and I love the smell that lingers for about a day after doing so.

Build your own furniture?

Yes because I can't find good furniture for prices that aren't extortion level priced. That and you try finding a solid walnut desk.

While I understand the need to make things other people's problems there is a real sense of accomplishment when you do something your self. Once you get good at doing things you can generally do a better job than the quick and dirty you paid someone. When I change oil I actually spend the time while the oil is draining to check things that should be checked regularly, like belts, hoses, suspension, wheel bearings, lights, etc. I also will take care of things like knocking some of the dust and dirt out of the air filter, and changing the power steering fluid that is in the reservoir, charging the battery all the way, greasing the wheel bearings. Now add in that I can do a full synthetic fluid change for about $50 on a vehicle that has a 7 quart oil capacity and takes a rather expensive canister filter. The 45 minutes I spend changing oil I come out ahead since I would spend about 45 minutes to go get it changed and get back from the rapid oil change place and they do a shitty job which costs more and likely they would cross thread the drain plug.

2 days ago
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Car Thieves and Insurers Vote On Keyless Car Security

Bob the Super Hamste Re:slim jim = stolen CDs. Hot wiring much harder (219 comments)

Hell in the US one the the most effective theft deterrent systems is a manual gear box. Then add in not keeping anything valuable laying around in your car and you could probably leave it unlocked in most cases.

3 days ago
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Car Thieves and Insurers Vote On Keyless Car Security

Bob the Super Hamste Re:I wish I'd thought of that (219 comments)

It's amazing what a long-handled flat-bladed screwdriver will do to your average pin/wafer tumbler lock...

I am always shocked at how many people don't know that trick. I did that to an old fire chest I had that in all the moves I had lost the key and the fire chest was only $30 so it was the quick and simple route. Also if you damage the pins and tumbler enough just about anything will work as a key as those things wear out. The ignition on my old Bronco II was so worn I could use a small pocket knife blade in the key slot to start it. For security forget padlocks since the easy way around them has and always will be an angle grinder. Working at a U-Haul with a storage facility we were always dealing with units for non payment and eventually would auction off the contents. The day of the auction you go out with the angle grinder cut the lock, let the bidders have a peak shut the door, and sell it. A nice silicon carbide or diamond coated cutting wheel goes through those locks like a hot knife through butter, even these recommended locks.

3 days ago
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Creationism Conference at Michigan State University Stirs Unease

Bob the Super Hamste Re:Public Use of a Public Space (976 comments)

Also ask if GPS is a giant hoax since it relies on relativistic effects to provide accurate timing.

3 days ago
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Creationism Conference at Michigan State University Stirs Unease

Bob the Super Hamste Re:Holocaust Deniers in Jewish Studies lecture hal (976 comments)

Sounds like all you are missing would be an orgy in the cafeteria. Speech is protected even if it is offensive vile speech. A very similar case to your Holocaust Denier's one was litigated all the way up to the US Supreme Court.

3 days ago

Submissions

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TSA airport screenings now start before you arrive at the airport

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  1 year,9 days

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) writes "The New York Times is reporting that the TSA is now doing background investigations on passengers before they arrive at the airport. The publicly stated reason for this is that it is to streamline the security procedures at airports allowing more passengers to receive less scrutiny while at the air port but this new authority allows the TSA additional information about each traveler. The prescreening that is being performed for domestic travel now uses a simiar standard to that of foreign individuals who where entering the US. The new measures go beyond what is used in the Secure Flight program and while light on details mentions that the passengers passport number will be used. The article does however point out the data sources that are available to the TSA to conduct these pre-screening with such as tax identification number, past travel itineraries, property records, physical characteristics, and law enforcement or intelligence information. Also mentioned is that individuals who do not have a passport will not be subjected to the rules and from my reading will not be eligible for lesser screening at that airport. The stated goal of this program is to have 25% of all airline passengers in the US receive lighter screening at the airport so that they don't have to take their shoes off, remove jackets, or remove laptops from bags. Additionally passengers who are in higher risk categories can receive additional screenings. Also mentioned is that all passengers are currently prescreened and that airlines are required to share your passport data with the TSA if they have it."
Link to Original Source
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Judge refuses to throw out case of man who videotaped ambulance crew

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  about a year ago

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) writes "In a follow up to the case of the man who was charged with HIPPA violations for video taping an ambulance crew doing their job the St. Paul Pioneer Press is reporting that the trial will go forward. The charges against Andrew Joseph Henderson currently are disorderly conduct and interfering with an ambulance crew. According to Henderson he was 30 feet away from the ambulance crew and thus could not have been interfering with their work while the police claim it was 3 to 5 feed. Henderson also challenged the disorderly conduct charge which in law is defined as "offensive, obscene, abusive, boisterous, or noisy conduct that the actor knows or has reason to know would tend to alarm, anger or disturb others or provoke an assault or breach of the peace." One of the issues in the previous story was the deletion of his video recording which the police took as evidence, as stated by one police officer, which had it not been deleted would have been able to clear this issue up.

The /. article that covered the previous story is this one."

Link to Original Source
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Copyright keeping books and music from the market

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  about a year ago

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) writes "CNN Money is reporting on a study by Paul J. Heald of the University of Illinois College of Law which shows what many Slashdoters already believe, that our current copyright laws actually keep books and music off the market instead of helping to increase their availability. The study looked at the availability of new (not used) books that were copyrighted in 1850 and 1950 and found that there were 3 times the number of books available from 1850 than from 1950 even though more books were published in 1950. The issues brought up in the study and article are that our current copyright laws:
Actually hurt the availability of works
Don't provide the the incentive to create that we have been lead to believe
the copyright of a works correlates with the disappearance a work rather than its availability."

Link to Original Source
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Computer trading and dark pools

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  about a year ago

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) writes "CNN Money has an article on computerized trading specifically the non-public markets that are often used to execute orders. The company that the article discusses executes 1/8 of all stock trades in the US or about 900 million trades a day, for comparison the NYSE executes about 700 million trades. The article discusses dark pools or private markets where quotes aren't disclosed to the broader public markets. If the company is unable to fill an order from within its own dark pool it will submit the order to the broader public market, 13 public exchanges, as well as up to 20 other private dark pools. The quotes offered by the private dark pools by law have to be the same or better quote than those offered on public exchanges. There have been recent questions about whether the quotes provided by dark pools have been the best for customers and there is a current investigation by FINRA into the methods used by market makers and dark pool operators to fill orders."
Link to Original Source
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Comcast to expand public WiFi using home internet connections

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  about a year ago

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) writes "The St. Paul Pioneer press is reporting that Comcast is planning on expanding its network of public WiFi hot spots in the Twin Cities area by using home internet connections and user's WiFi routers. Customers will be upgraded to new wireless routers that will have 2 wireless networks, one for the home users and one for the general public. Subscribers to Comcast's Xfinity service and customers that participate in the public WiFi program will be allowed free access to the public WiFi offered by this service. Non Comcast customers get 2 free sessions a month each lasting 1 hour with additional sessions costing money. The article mentions that a similar service already exists and is provided by the Spain-based company Fon."
Link to Original Source
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PETA looking to use drones to watch hunters and farmers

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) writes "CNN is reporting that PETA is looking into using drones to monitor hunters and farmers. Specifically PETA wants to use drones where ever animals may be abused to killed. At present they do not possess any drones or have specific locations selected for deployment. The article point out that PETA isn't the first group to deploy drones to watch hunters and mentions the incidents with the group SHARK that has made news previously when their drones were twice shot down while monitoring pigeon hunts."
Link to Original Source
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Comcast buys out GE's remaining 49% stake in NBC

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Bob the Super Hamste writes "On Tuesday Comcast announced that it would accelerated its acquisition of NBCUniversal and purchase the remaining 49% owned by GE for $16.7 billion.Previously GE and Comcast were expected to operate NBCUniversal jointly until mid 2014 with Comcast having the option to extend that out until 2018. So far there are not details on when the deal with be completed but the article indicates that Comcast's complete acquisition of NBCUniversal will be completed years earlier that initially thought."
Link to Original Source
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Man charged with HIPPA violations for video taping police

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  about 2 years ago

Bob the Super Hamste writes "The St. Paul Pioneer Press is reporting that Andrew Henderson was recording Ramsey County sheriff's deputies frisk a bloodied faced man who was then loaded into an ambulance by paramedics. Then the sheriff's deputy Jacqueline Muellner approached Andrew Henderson and confiscated his video camera stating "We'll just take this for evidence" which was recorded on Andrew Henderson cell phone. On October 30th Andrew Henderson went to Arden Hills sheriff's office to retrieve his video camera where he was told where he would have to wait to receive his camera back. A week later Andrew Henderson was charged with obstruction of legal process and disorderly conduct with the citation stating "While handling a medical/check the welfare (call), (Henderson) was filming it. Data privacy HIPAA violation. Refused to identify self. Had to stop dealing with sit(uation) to deal w/Henderson." In mid November Andrew Henderson went back to the sheriff's office to attempt to retrieve his camera and get a copy of the report when Deputy Dan Eggers refused. Deputy Dan Eggers pulled Andrew Henderson and have the following discussion which was also recorded by Andrew Henderson.
Deputy Dan Eggers: "I think that what (the deputies) felt was you were interfering with someone's privacy that was having a medical mental health breakdown," "They felt like you were being a 'buttinski' by getting that camera in there and partially recording what was going on in a situation that you were not directly involved in."
Deputy Dan Eggers stated that Henderson should "have a little respect" for people's privacy to which Andrew Henderson stated that he had done nothing illegal
Deputy Dan Eggers noted that the incident report stated nothing was recorded on the camera.
Deputy Dan Eggers: "I mean, were you just pointing it?"
Andrew Henderson: "No. It was deleted,"
Deputy Dan Eggers: "You deleted it?"
Andrew Henderson: "No. She must have deleted it," referring to Jacqueline Muellner.
Not possible, Deputy Dan Eggers replied. "There would have been some documentation about that."

Randy Gustafson Ramsey County sheriff's office spokesman states "It is not our policy to take video cameras. It is everybody's right to (record) ... What happens out in public happens out in public. One exception might be when a law enforcement officer decides that the recording is needed for evidence, he said. In that case, the officer would generally send the file to investigators and return the camera on the spot."

Jane Kirtley professor of media ethics and media law at the University of Minnesota states that "Law enforcement has no expectation of privacy when they are carrying out public duties in a public place." She also notes that the seizure and alleged erasure of recorded evidence "raises significant Fourth Amendment issues for him ... The seizure here was not to preserve the evidence — it was to destroy the evidence."

Jennifer Granick, a specialist on privacy issues at Stanford University Law School, states that the alleged violation of HIPPA rules by Andrew Henderson is nonsense stating "There's nothing in HIPAA that prevents someone who's not subject to HIPAA from taking photographs on the public streets, HIPAA has absolutely nothing to say about that.""

Link to Original Source
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Ford plans to use Aluminum body panels in its F-150 trucks

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Bob the Super Hamste writes "The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Ford is planning on using aluminum body panels in its F-150 trucks. By using these panels they expect to be able to cut about 750 pounds from each vehicle. This move is being driven by the need to meet new EPA fuel economy standards. The article also points out that this will add approximately $1500 dollars to the material cost of each F-150. This may eat into the profit on each vehicle or may be passed along to consumers. Additionally there are manufacturing difficulties in switching from steel to aluminum body panels such as aluminum having more of a tendency to return to its original shape, requiring suction instead of magnets to lift, bonding to other panels. Additionally bonding and welding panels together requires different techniques and the dies that stamp the parts will need to be kept cleaner to prevent scratching the metal. The presses that stamp the panels will need to be run at a slower speed as well to prevent tearing the sheet metal. The article notes that biggest challenge facing Ford in doing this may actually be convincing truck buyers that aluminum is just as tough as steel. This isn't Ford's first time working with aluminum bodies for vehicles as they have in the past produced a small fleet of aluminum bodied Tauruses as well as producing aluminum bodied Jaguars while they were owned by Ford. Several other manufacturers are currently making use of aluminum in vehicles as well as having been used in the past."
Link to Original Source
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Venezuela bans the commercial sale of firearms and ammunition

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Bob the Super Hamste writes "The BBC is reporting on a new law in Venezuela that effectively bans the commercial sale of firearms and ammunition to private citizens. Previously anyone with a permit could purchase a firearm from any commercial vendor but now only the police, military, and security firms will be able to purchase firearms or ammunition from only state owned manufactures or importers. Hugo Chavez's government states that the goal is to eventually disarm the citizenry. The law which went into effect today was passed on February 29th and up to this point the government has been running an amnesty program allowing citizens to turn in their illegal firearms. Since the law was first passed 805,000 rounds of ammunition have been recovered from gun dealers. The measure is intended to curb violent crime in Venezuela where 78% of homicides are linked to firearms."
Link to Original Source
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UK Draft Energy Bill avoids banning coal or gas power

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Bob the Super Hamste writes "The BBC is reporting that the UK's new Draft Energy Bill avoids banning coal or gas powered plants. The bill would guarantee profits for new nuclear and offshore wind plants by putting a levy on people's energy bills. The bill does not mandate a statement that minsters had previously made about having totally clean energy within 2 decades. The government states that provisions within the bill will ensure a balanced diverse energy mix as well has stating that future emissions from gas powered plants will have to be captured and stored. The bill also aims to increase competition in the UK energy market by making it easier for new competitors to become connected to the grid.

Joss Garman of Greenpeace states:
"By failing to set a clear goal for carbon-free electricity by 2030, ministers are opening the door to a dangerous new dash for gas that will put up both bills and carbon emissions, and increase our dependence on imported fuel. This means families and business will be exposed to rocketing international gas prices. The fastest and cheapest way to bring down bills and carbon emissions is by ramping up energy efficiency but Ministers have totally failed to deliver on this."

Additionally it would appear that the guarantee of profits for for new nuclear power plants may not be legal as there is a ban on subsidies for nuclear power under European law and the UK coalition government agreement"

Link to Original Source
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Sicence fiction writer Elizabeth Moon believes everyone should be chipped

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Bob the Super Hamste writes "The BBC has an opinion piece from science fiction writer Elizabeth Moon who believes that everyone should be chipped at birth. Her reasoning is that it would prevent identification mistakes and even allow soldiers to identify combatants from non combatants. You can hear the full piece from the BBC World Service programme The Forum here."
Link to Original Source
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In communist North Korea even nature mourns Dear L

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Bob the Super Hamste writes "The BBC is reporting that state run media KCNA is reporting that even nature appears to be mourning the loss of Dear Leader. Such incidents include the ice on lake Chon cracking so loud it seemed to shake the Heavens and the Earth, a snow storm hitting as Mr. Kim died, once the snow storm subsided a message carved in rock on the mountain read — "Mount Paektu, holy mountain of revolution. Kim Jong-il" and glowed until sunset. Additionally the Manchurian crane on the statue of Kim Il Sung adopted a posture of grief."
Link to Original Source
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Ask Slashdot: Reccomended Print On Demand Service

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Bob the Super Hamste writes "One of my side projects is amateur cartography because I have always been kind of a map geek. A few years ago I got tired of maps targeted to hunters that were at best a glorified road atlas and at worst unusable and not worth the paper they were printed on. After a few years of part time effort on gathering, processing, and rendering various data sets I now can create some impressive maps that provide the kind of info that hunters actually care about. I would like to get it in printed book format as that would be the most useful format when on long trips. I have looked at Lulu and Create Space so far but haven't had anything printed by either one yet. Ideally I would like the book to be spiral bound so it will lay flat or can be folded over. Additionally I would like it to able to be available for others to buy and have an ISBN so it can make it into book, retail, and online stores if it does well. From my initial reading on both Lulu and CreateSpace it seems like I can get most of what I want but can't do it if the book is spiral bound. Also the book is going to be in the 300 to 400 page count range and it is all color images. My question is what have been /. users experiences with the quality, options, and costs of various print on demand services?"
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Mystery of 2000 year super noval solved new myster

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  about 3 years ago

Bob the Super Hamste writes "The BBC is reporting that the mystery of a 2000 year old supernova has been solved. The supernova RCW 86 was observed in 185AD by Chinese astronomers and was visible for eight months. Recently sicentists have wondered how the supernova grew so big. By combining data from the Chandra X-ray telescope and the XMM-Newton Observatory with recent images from the US space agency Nasa's Spitzer and Wide-field Infrared Survey (Wise) telescopes scientists scientists have figured out that the supernova expanded into a relatively empty bubble of space. These empty bubbles of space are typically associated with a core collapse supernova but the core remnant is high in iron which instead is associated with a type 1A super nova. The findings are published in the Astrophysical Journal."
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Public supports geo-engineering

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  about 3 years ago

Bob the Super Hamste writes "The BBC is reporting that there is strong among the public in the US, UK, and Canada for research into geo-engineering with approximately 72% respondents supporting the research. The survey was focused on solar radiation management. The article also mentions the UK Stratospheric Particle Injection for Climate Engineering (SPICE) project which would inject water particles into the upper atmosphere as a prelude to spraying cooling sulphate. Researchers for the SPICE project calculate that 10-20 balloons could cool the global climate by 2C. Also mentioned in the article is the voluntary moratorium on the procedure by the international Convention on Biological Diversity"
Link to Original Source
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Algae fuel summit

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  about 3 years ago

Bob the Super Hamste writes "The St. Paul Pioneer Press is reporting on the fifth annual Algal Biomass Organization Summit from October 24th through the 27th. The University of Minnesota will be kicking off the summit with a tour of their laboratory at St. Anthony Falls. The University of Minnesota operates an algae growing greenhouse at it's research facility in UMore Park Rosemount MN. The article covers the usual points that is typically grown in warmer sunnier climates and also that algae avoids the food vs fuel debate associated with corn ethanol and soybean bio diesel. An interesting point the article makes is that currently algae based bio fuels do not count as renewable fuels because they are not made from the right type of plant. As usual John Sheehan, science director of the University of Minnesota's Initiative for Renewable Energy and the Environment points out that this is 5 years or longer for high volume fuel production, with emphasis on the longer."
Link to Original Source
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Is online property real? Lawyer says no.

Bob the Super Hamste Bob the Super Hamste writes  |  about 3 years ago

Bob the Super Hamste writes "The St. Paul Pioneer Press is reporting on an analysis by lawyer Justin Kwong in the William Mitchell Law Review about virtual property and ownership. Justin Kwong asserts that virtual items are not real items and that you do not own them but only have a license. The analysis stems from a 2008 case of a Blane, MN man who filed a police report for the online theft of approximately $3800 of virtual goods. Justin Kwong compares virtual items to a mug club at a bar where patrons purchase rights to a specific numbered mug but cannot remove the mug from the premises. He does note that if in game items are purchased there needs to be clear language stating:
"the transaction is a license, not a sale, and that traditional consumer protections afforded by sales of goods do not necessarily apply""

Link to Original Source

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