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Comments

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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

Bob9113 Re:Rather than address the underlying problem (304 comments)

How do you know what the growth rate in the 50s and 60s would have been had the tax rates in the US been lower?

I only deal in empirical evidence. The warnings about higher taxes killing GDP growth are demonstrably false by comparing observed results over the past 70 years.

What's that about being ignorant?

Imagining things that might have been does not count as presenting evidence.

yesterday
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

Bob9113 Re:Rather than address the underlying problem (304 comments)

It is stupid if you are paying credit card rates. The US government pays insanely low interest rates and a few times, they've been negative! If someone pays you to borrow money, you'd be stupid not to take it.

The problem is that those interest rates change; our debt is revolving. When the interest rates go up, we're going to have to have to pay down the debt while our interest nut is climbing. So either we'll be showing a higher risk of default or we'll devalue the dollar; either way, the interest will climb even more. This has been repeated dozens of times in history. Every time a country has tried it, with the possible exception of Japan right now, it has ended badly. And most economists think that in Japan is about to hit the wall -- they're going to be our canary in the coalmine.

yesterday
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

Bob9113 Re:Rather than address the underlying problem (304 comments)

Really? Doesn't seem that that far out of line.

Really? You're not very good at math. Average from 1950 - 1969: 17%. Average over the past five years: 15.22%. (17 - 15.22) / 15.22 = 11.69%. Twelve percent higher seems like a lot to me.

Now taxation per capita, adjusted for inflation, is way up.

So is income, which is why I, and the chart you linked to, and anyone who understands economics, uses percentage of GDP.

And spending is even growing faster...

By all means, cut spending. I'm all for it. Until we get there, though, we can't just not pay our bills.

yesterday
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New Global Plan Would Crack Down On Corporate Tax Avoidance

Bob9113 Re:Rather than address the underlying problem (304 comments)

instead of trying to preserve the high tax state?

Historically low total tax as a percentage of GDP in a very long time. Lower than most of the first world. What high tax state are you talking about? 'Cuz it's clearly not the US.

And, we are running a gigantic deficit. We have to pay our bills, because paying the interest on credit cards is stupid, period. So, cut spending, then we can bring taxes back down to the current level.

And may I repeat: Historically low total tax as a percentage of GDP. Far lower than during the 50's and 60's, when we experienced the fastest sustained GDP growth rate of any first world country *ever*. So any Laffer Curve argument you want to make would just make you sound ignorant.

yesterday
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Tim Cook Says Apple Can't Read Users' Emails, That iCloud Wasn't Hacked

Bob9113 False Headline (187 comments)

Tim Cook Says Apple Can't Read Users' Emails,

No he didn't.

Apple previously said that even it can't access iMessage and FaceTime communications, stating that such messages and calls are not held in an "identifiable form." [Cook] claimed if the government "laid a subpoena," then Apple "can't provide it." He said, bluntly: "We don't have a key... the door is closed." He reiterated previous comments, whereby Apple has said it is not in the business of collecting people's data. He said: "When we design a new service, we try not to collect data. We're not reading your email."

He said they cannot read iMessage and FaceTime, and they are not reading your email. That is a very important distinction. It might be one he was hoping you would miss, and you did miss it, but he did not say they can't access your email.

And I'm not blowing sunshine up his skirt. I came here intending to kick him in the balls (metaphorically, of course) for lying, but he didn't.

Pro-tip: If any system includes a password recovery mechanism that allows you to get back messages, then the administrator of the password recovery system can read your back messages.

yesterday
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Industry-Based ToDo Alliance Wants To Guide FOSS Development

Bob9113 You Want to Help? Paid Development (54 comments)

"an open group of companies who run open source programs" who are seeking to "committed to working together in order to overcome" the challenges of using FOSS

If the megacorps want to get involved in the advancement of FOSS, they have an incredibly clear path to do so: Paid Development. They can fund it themselves, if they want to decide what gets built next. Or, to get a little creative, how about this: Put together some training materials for corporate legal departments explaining that companies can legally, safely, contribute code developed on company time back to FOSS projects. Put together a promotional campaign to convince corporate bean counters that contributing code back to FOSS is a worthwhile investement of company resources.

In short; help channel money into FOSS, either directly or by clearing the red tape that keeps us from creating and kicking back enhancements built for the benefit of our companies. Hey, maybe lobby congress for a tax write-off for code contributions to 501c3s.

Developers contribute to FOSS by giving of their greatest strength, development. If megacorps want to help, they should give of their greatest strengths; money and bureaucracy.

(and yes, I know, they think telling people what to do is their greatest strength, but they've got another think coming when it comes to telling FOSS developers what to do)

yesterday
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New Details About NSA's Exhaustive Search of Edward Snowden's Emails

Bob9113 Because William Binney and Thomas Drake (196 comments)

In 2001, William Binney, an NSA investigator, began blowing the whistle on NSA warrantless surveillance. He went through official channels to his superiors, then to Congress, then to the major media. He was harrassed and prosecuted by the government, and ignored and maginalized by the major media. He has kept at it for the past thirteen years.

In 2010, Thomas Drake started blowing the whistle. He was also prosecuted, harrassed, ignored, and marginalized.

In 2011, Ron Wyden began warning the public about the secret interpretation of the PATRIOT Act, as loudly as he could without violating his clearance to be on the Intelligence Committee. The major media ignored him.

In 2013, when Snowden released his docs, the major media finally started listening to Binney, Drake, and Wyden. The establishment's treatment of Binney, Drake, and Wyden is why Snowden had to follow the path he did.

The President of the United States has said that these programs should change. Programs that Binney, Drake, and Wyden tried to warn us about through official channels. Programs that we still would not know about if Snowden had gone through official channels.

2 days ago
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Oculus Rift CEO Says Classrooms of the Future Will Be In VR Goggles

Bob9113 Classrooms Are A Bug, Not a Feature (182 comments)

Education? ... Yes! Why it's great for education! In fact, it's the future of the classroom! And don't forget, Oculus Rift is both a floor wax and a dessert topping!

But seriously:

And if we can make virtual reality every bit as good as real reality in terms of communications and the sense of shared presence with others, you can now educate people in virtual classrooms, you can now educate people with virtual objects, and we can all be in a classroom together [virtually], we can all be present, we can have relationships and communication that are just as good as the real classroom

Classroom teaching is a bug, not a feature. It is a side effect of the fact that our earholes and eyeballs are connected to our skulls, and until recently we had to put them in the same meatspace where the teacher was talking and showing pictures. Once you step into the no-physical-presence-required realm of using a VR headset, you can release the restrictions imposed by the simultaneous physical presence requirement.

One simple example: Lecture halls, with their tiered seating -- those are designed that way because we can't see through each other, not because it is better to be sixty feet away and at a thirty degree angle from the teacher.

And how about discussions? Hierarchical, collaboratively moderated, store-and-forward discussion threads are much better than "realtime whoever gets the teacher's attention before the bell rings." We've been using the latter because that's the best we had for thousands of years.

2 days ago
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School Installs Biometric Fingerprint System For Cafeteria

Bob9113 Re:Spurious Claim (230 comments)

It certainly less risky than walking around the streets with huge money clip

Did you not even read the links about Home Depot, Supervalu, and Albertson's? It is not certainly less risky. For example, it is more risky if you live in an area that has very little threat of mugging, or if you are perceived as a bad target for muggers. I generally have a few hundred dollars in my pocket, and have never been mugged; but my card is for sale on the Russian markets right now because I used Home Depot.

You are as stubbornly ignorant as people who say self-driving cars will automatically be safer. Computers aren't magically endowed with perfection. Believe me; I'm a software engineer, and I've seen some really heinous bugs. I'm not saying electronic payments (or autonomous vehicles) are bad -- I'm saying software and networks have risks just like meatware and meatspace.

3 days ago
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School Installs Biometric Fingerprint System For Cafeteria

Bob9113 Re:just prepay for food (230 comments)

in my kid's school in the USA the only way to pay for school lunch is to send a check once a month... no tracking

Interesting difference, there. There must be tracking in your kid's school's system, otherwise they wouldn't know who paid for lunch, but the tracking data probably doesn't get appropriated by an outside company. Presumably, this biometric company is not just making a buck on the scanners, software, and cloud-based management contract -- presumably they also have a plan for monetizing the data they are collecting about the kids.

3 days ago
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School Installs Biometric Fingerprint System For Cafeteria

Bob9113 Spurious Claim (230 comments)

The benefits are that pupils are less likely to lose [money stored in the fingerprint system than money carried in their pockets]

That is a spurious claim. The security on money stored in pockets and exchanged by physical transfer of a monetary token is fallible, but so is the security on the cafeteria electronic wallet system. Home Depot, Supervalu, and Albertson's are very recent examples of major compromises, and the number of small scale compromises is enormous.

Fingerprints can be faked, networks can be cracked, databases can crash. Merely moving from physical currency to electronic currency does not make it more secure -- just ask Mt. Gox.

3 days ago
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German Court: Google Must Stop Ignoring Customer E-mails

Bob9113 Re:define "customer" (290 comments)

from what i understand of the definition of "customer", a "customer" means "someone who is paying for a service". here, there's no payment involved, therefore there is no contract of sale.

The correct legal term for payment is, "consideration." The user's relationship with Gmail does involve payment in the form of consideration, and they are customers.

As a counter-example; if you download Free Software, or Open Source Software, and use it without making any promises to the developer, you are not a customer. Possibly if Gmail had no ToS or AUP, they could argue that their users gave no consideration. I'd be interested to see that argued.

5 days ago
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US Rust Belt Manufacturing Rebounds Via Fracking Boom

Bob9113 Re:Excellent Question (191 comments)

While I get what you are saying as far as "research" it's kind of like saying; "We can't know how to treat Agent Orange damage if we don't keep spraying Agent Orange -- there won't be enough data."

While I get what you are saying, I think you are using a charged metaphor. We know how bad Agent Orange is. We genuinely do not know how dangerous fracking is. Try replacing Agent Orange with, for example, "the search for the Higgs Boson", or "artificial intelligence", or some other thing that has unknown potential to be disastrous.

Fracking is a transition tech -- it's getting the last bits of natural gas and that's fine. But if we spent more money pushing the alternative energy -- which WILL EVENTUALLY be cheaper, we speed the day and time when it's more viable.

I agree, completely, though I think that's not a problem with fracking. I think the right place for that is a tax on fossil fuels to generate some friction on fossil fuel use. If you want, the collected revenue could be targeted to stimulate alternatives, but I tend to want to keep governments hands off the stimulus side (since they're so good at handing the money to their friends instead of the most promising technology) -- though I'd be more OK with the money going to government funded research, particularly if the results were put in the public domain -- like maybe cellulosic fiber biofuel research... but I digress. :)

The environment and mankind will be better off on alternative energy so why are we dragging our feet on that while making excuses for the BAD STUFF somehow getting better? It makes no sense and that's not being "entrenched" on a point of view. Solar and Wind are the future -- there is no good excuse to wait.

I agree with where your sentiment is coming from, and I think it's a good place. But I'm not sure I completely agree that we, as a society, are entrenched and waiting. We have fossil fuel taxes in place, and we are doing stimulus of solar and wind. And it's going really well -- have you seen the prices of PV panels lately? They've dropped a lot -- when I first started looking in 2008, a 250 watt panel was about $1,000. Now you can get them for under $300.

And I'm not 100% against fracking -- I just recognize it as a stop gap measure.

Very agreed.

about a week ago
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US Rust Belt Manufacturing Rebounds Via Fracking Boom

Bob9113 Re:Excellent Question (191 comments)

You'll notice that your "market failure" argument is completely based on a non-market "government chill-factor" driver?

No, I will not. The same short-term-orientation market failure would occur in a pure laissez-faire system. In that case, the failure to account for long-term risk combined with limited liability, bankruptcy, and shell corporations would result in the same public risk / private profit that is the primary economic failure with fracking now.

I will grant that it is exacerbated by the current government stance of "no regulation now, unknown-and-probably-stricter regulation in the future." Solving that hastening of the public risk, however, only requires that regulation remain approximately the same or become less strict over time. Combined with the fact that some level of regulation to offset public risk exposure (negative externality) is the GDP maximizing solution, starting with zero regulation is necessarily incorrect.

about a week ago
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US Rust Belt Manufacturing Rebounds Via Fracking Boom

Bob9113 Re:Excellent Question (191 comments)

But what if doing the fracking causes irreversible damage? Maybe we need to make the mistake to realize it's one, but then it might be too late. Some countries apply the "Principle of precaution", that is, "if you're not sure of the effects of what you're doing, don't fucking do it."

Well played. :)

Here, let me do the iconic example of the other side:

'We can't have government jumping in and killing off entire industries just because the sky might be falling. There have been no major catastrophes as a direct result of fracking, and even the few relatively minor events that have been recorded turned out not to be caused by fracking, but by improper deep-well injection of effluent.'

about a week ago
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US Rust Belt Manufacturing Rebounds Via Fracking Boom

Bob9113 Excellent Question (191 comments)

do the associated environmental risks of new "tight oil" extraction techniques outweigh the benefits to these depressed economic regions?

That is an excellent question. What we need is an excellent answer. Unfortunately, right now, we only have some rather crude guesses, mostly made by people with entrenched preconceptions (on both sides of the issue). We don't know what the probable environmental cost of an additional $100m of fracking production is.

There are two reasons to continue fracking, while going easy on the rate of production; 1) the oil will still be there, it will probably continue to climb in value, and we are learning -- by doing -- more cost effective and safer approaches to extraction, and 2) because we need more data to improve the risk assessment model.

Not doing fracking won't get us the data we need, and would prevent us from developing the technology to get this stuff out cheaper and safer. Doing fracking as fast as we can will waste money and create additional damage by using current early-stage extraction processes, and it exposes us to poorly quantified risk.

The biggest problem right now is that the oil companies, in fear of regulation-to-come, are extracting as fast as they can to try to get the money out of the ground before the axe falls. That is pretty much the worst possible answer: It minimizes the profit margin on a finite resource while maximizing the risk. It is a textbook example of short-term orientation market failure.

about a week ago
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L.A. Times National Security Reporter Cleared Stories With CIA Before Publishing

Bob9113 Re:Follow the money... (188 comments)

See Freedom of the press in the United States.

That entry starts with a long exposition on the fact that corporations do not have more freedom of the press than citizens. I do not disagree with that. I think corporations should be treated more skeptically regarding their invocation of freedom of the press than should individual citizens.

All rights are inherent to individuals and when individuals organize, as in the formation of the LA Times, these rights are not lost.

No, the individuals do not lose their rights. But whether the corporation is allowed to engage in trade is a very different question. Paying people to write opinions which are pleasing to the corporation is very different than those people freely engaging in that activity. The entire point of the Declaration of Independence is that individuals can be trusted more than collectives, so The People must remain the sole sovereigns.

Citizens United was wrong. Paid speech is not free speech. Paid press is not free press. Corporations are not citizens.

about two weeks ago
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L.A. Times National Security Reporter Cleared Stories With CIA Before Publishing

Bob9113 Re:Follow the money... (188 comments)

What?!? I don't know which constitution you're referring to, but the Constitution of the United States of America certainly doesn't specify duties or obligations for citizens.

The LA Times is not a citizen. You can tell because it doesn't have nipples. It is the press. See the first amendment to the Constitution. For more info on why that specific industry gets special constitutional treatment, see fourth estate.

about two weeks ago
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L.A. Times National Security Reporter Cleared Stories With CIA Before Publishing

Bob9113 Re:Follow the money... (188 comments)

Let me see if I get your argument:

Their business model is failing, so it's understandable that they are shirking their Constitutionally specified duty, despite the legal privileges they enjoy in furtherance of that obligation.

I mean, I see what you're saying -- a dying animal bites its master -- but that's when you get out the dart gun full of tranquilizer and address the problem. You don't just shake your head and tsk-tsk, wrap your bloody arm in a t-shirt, and go get a rabies shot.

about two weeks ago
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Stallman Does Slides -- and Brevity -- For TEDx

Bob9113 Re:Practical problems with a hard line stance (326 comments)

11:25 "Don't bring any proprietary software to this class." So which cell phone running free software should students be putting in their bags instead?

Depends what your primary objective is. If your primary objective is to have a cell phone with you, you sacrifice freedom. If your primary objective is to give no comfort to those who are harmful to that end, you sacrifice carrying a cell phone.

Me? I'm pretty serious about Free Software, but being connected is also important to me. So I have a CyanogenMod phone, and I'll keep going more Free as it becomes practical and as my budget allows.

12:48 "So how to help? Well you can write free software." So how would you go about feeding yourself while you write a free video game?

Depends what your higher priority is. If financial responsibility, to your lifestyle or to support your family, is most important to you, write proprietary video games. If freedom is most important, you can sell your games through Humble Bundle, have embedded ads and ask people not to disable them, ask for voluntary payments, use one of the crowdfunding systems, live a modest lifestyle and work some other job to pay the bills, or whatever you want; there's lots of ways to make a living while writing Free Software.

Me? I work a pay-the-bills job consulting, working less than full time, live a modest lifestyle, and work on pro-social projects the rest of the time (not Free Software for me at the moment, but with similar goals).

He's not telling you that you must always blindly obey the principles that lead to freedom. He's telling you what principles must be satisfied to be free. He says very clearly, early in the presentation, that being free requires sacrifices. Whether you choose freedom or convenience in any particular choice you make in life is up to you. Just make it with your eyes open; be aware of your personal opportunity cost and the cost to society.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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GamerGate May Have Been an Op

Bob9113 Bob9113 writes  |  about a week ago

Bob9113 (14996) writes "Casey Johnston at Ars Technica has a story on GamerGate: "A set of IRC logs released Saturday appear to show that a handful of 4chan users were ultimately behind #GamerGate, the supposedly grass-roots movement aimed at exposing ethical lapses in gaming journalism. The logs show a small group of users orchestrating a "hashtag campaign" to perpetuate misogynistic attacks by wrapping them in a debate about ethics in gaming journalism....""
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Electric Neutrality: An Alternative Perspective on Net Neutrality

Bob9113 Bob9113 writes  |  about 3 months ago

Bob9113 (14996) writes "I have been trying to frame Net Neutrality to explain it to a broader audience. I have been comparing it to the shipping carrier networks, but that works best with people who already understand common carrier and how it relates to physical carriage. A couple days ago, I thought of a different service to compare it to, and it is proving much easier to explain to people who are less familiar with limited competition networks. I created a YouTube video that explores how electricity network neutrality is critical to protecting the free market in electric appliances."
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May 15 FCC Protest to Support Net Neutrality

Bob9113 Bob9113 writes  |  about 4 months ago

Bob9113 (14996) writes "On Thursday, May 15, hundreds will rally outside the Federal Communications Commission’s headquarters in Washington, D.C., to protest Chairman Wheeler’s proposal that has the potential to stop the flow of a free and open Internet. On this same day, thousands of activists, organizations and companies will take action online to save the Internet. “Chairman Wheeler is feeling the grassroots pressure against his pay-for-prioritization proposal. But he still isn’t giving Internet users the Net Neutrality protections they demand,” said Free Press President and CEO Craig Aaron. “He needs to abandon the flimsy and failed legal approach of his predecessors and reclassify Internet service providers as the common carriers they are. If preventing fast and slow lanes on the Internet is the goal, reclassification is the way forward.""
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NSA Tampers With US Made Routers Before Export

Bob9113 Bob9113 writes  |  about 4 months ago

Bob9113 (14996) writes "According to Glenn Greenwald, reporting at The Guardian: 'A June 2010 report from the head of the NSA's Access and Target Development department is shockingly explicit. The NSA routinely receives – or intercepts – routers, servers, and other computer network devices being exported from the US before they are delivered to the international customers. The agency then implants backdoor surveillance tools, repackages the devices with a factory seal, and sends them on. The NSA thus gains access to entire networks and all their users. The document gleefully observes that some "SIGINT tradecraft is very hands-on (literally!)".'"
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Final Surge Needed for Net Neutrality Petition

Bob9113 Bob9113 writes  |  about 4 months ago

Bob9113 (14996) writes "We need one more big surge of traffic, ideally starting Monday or Tuesday morning at around 10 AM Eastern, to get the Net Neutrality petition to 100k votes on time. I've been tracking the vote rate and it runs fastest on Tuesday, during the work day. We will get the most traction if as many people as possible promote the petition on their social network channels starting early this week. Please consider raising the issue and the petition on your social network channels to help generate the final surge in traffic we need to hit 100k signatures. The petition may not have as much legal authority as we would like, but at least it is a potent rhetorical device for Jessica Rosenworcel and Mignon Clyburn, the two FCC commissioners who are already raising opposition to allowing a fast lane."
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New White House Petition for Net Neutrality

Bob9113 Bob9113 writes  |  about 5 months ago

Bob9113 (14996) writes "On the heels of yesterday's FCC bombshell, there is a new petition on the White House petition site titled, "Maintain true net neutrality to protect the freedom of information in the United States." The body reads: "True net neutrality means the free exchange of information between people and organizations. Information is key to a society's well being. One of the most effective tactics of an invading military is to inhibit the flow of information in a population; this includes which information is shared and by who. Today we see this war being waged on American citizens. Recently the FCC has moved to redefine "net neutrality" to mean that corporations and organizations can pay to have their information heard, or worse, the message of their competitors silenced. We as a nation must settle for nothing less than complete neutrality in our communication channels. This is not a request, but a demand by the citizens of this nation. No bandwidth modifications of information based on content or its source.""
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RNC Calls For Halt To Unconstitutional Surveillance

Bob9113 Bob9113 writes  |  about 8 months ago

Bob9113 (14996) writes "According to an article on Ars Technica, the Republican National Committee (RNC) has passed a resolution that "encourages Republican lawmakers to immediately take action to halt current unconstitutional surveillance programs and provide a full public accounting of the NSA's data collection programs." The resolution, according to Time, was approved by an overwhelming majority voice vote at the Republican National Committee's Winter Meeting General Session, going on this week in Washington, DC."
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The Patent Problem Is Bigger Than Trolls

Bob9113 Bob9113 writes  |  about a year ago

Bob9113 (14996) writes "Ars Technica reports the following: "Canada-based telecom Nortel went bankrupt in 2009 and sold its biggest asset--a portfolio of more than 6,000 patents covering 4G wireless innovations and a range of technologies--at an auction in 2011. Google bid for the patents, but didn't get them. Instead, they went to a group of competitors--Microsoft, Apple, RIM, Ericsson, and Sony--operating under the name "Rockstar Bidco." The companies together bid the shocking sum of $4.5 billion. This afternoon, that stockpile was finally used for what pretty much everyone suspected it would be used for--launching an all-out patent attack on Google and Android. The smartphone patent wars have been underway for a few years now, and the eight lawsuits filed in federal court today by Rockstar Consortium mean that the conflict just hit DEFCON 1.""
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Defense Distributed Liberator Takedown

Bob9113 Bob9113 writes  |  about a year ago

Bob9113 (14996) writes "The top of the download page for the 3D model files of the Liberator — the 3D printable handgun from Defense Distributed — now bears the following notice: "DEFCAD files are being removed from public access at the request of the US Department of Defense Trade Controls. Until further notice, the United States government claims control of the information." There are no links on the page to download the .stl model files. The Wikipedia page for Defense Distributed suggests that the model files can still be found on torrent sites, though torrenting those files may have significant legal implications."
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Khanna Axed Over Copyright Memo

Bob9113 Bob9113 writes  |  about 2 years ago

Bob9113 (14996) writes "Ars Technica reports that Derek Khanna is getting axed over his memo detailing the conflict between laissez-faire-oriented free market ideals and the regulatory monopoly that is copyright.
"The Republican Study Committee, a caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives, has told staffer Derek Khanna that he will be out of a job when Congress re-convenes in January. The incoming chairman of the RSC, Steve Scalise (R-LA) was approached by several Republican members of Congress who were upset about a memo Khanna wrote advocating reform of copyright law. They asked that Khanna not be retained, and Scalise agreed to their request.""

Link to Original Source
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Bob9113 Bob9113 writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Bob9113 writes "Kevin Rose, founder of Digg, posted the following. Doing what you believe is right, what your customers believe is right, in the face of impossible odds — that is honor. The following is copied verbatim.

Digg This: 09-f9-11-02-9d-74-e3-5b-d8-41-56-c5-63-56-88-c0

by Kevin Rose at 9pm, May 1st, 2007 in Digg Website

Today was an insane day. And as the founder of Digg, I just wanted to post my thoughts...

In building and shaping the site I've always tried to stay as hands on as possible. We've always given site moderation (digging/burying) power to the community. Occasionally we step in to remove stories that violate our terms of use (eg. linking to pornography, illegal downloads, racial hate sites, etc.). So today was a difficult day for us. We had to decide whether to remove stories containing a single code based on a cease and desist declaration. We had to make a call, and in our desire to avoid a scenario where Digg would be interrupted or shut down, we decided to comply and remove the stories with the code.

But now, after seeing hundreds of stories and reading thousands of comments, you've made it clear. You'd rather see Digg go down fighting than bow down to a bigger company. We hear you, and effective immediately we won't delete stories or comments containing the code and will deal with whatever the consequences might be.

If we lose, then what the hell, at least we died trying.

Digg on,

Kevin"

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