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Comments

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Trans-Pacific Partnership May Endanger World Health, Newly Leaked Chapter Shows

Boronx Re:Cui bono? (130 comments)

Hey, you're right. Time to excise the Boston Tea Party out of the history books.

5 days ago
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Scientists Find Rats Aren't Smarter Than Mice, and That's Important

Boronx Re:Rat infestations harder to solve (154 comments)

Interesting. I've had the opposite result with mice. I can get the young ones easy, but the old wily ones I got to trick some how. The last infestation I had to deal with was 11 mice. The very last mouse I killed was this big fat misshapen guy who ran slowly and in a straight line. No dodging, no attempt to hide. I literally dropped a trap right in front of him and he walked into it.

My interpretation is that that mouse family was taking care of their disabled relative.

5 days ago
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Scientists Find Rats Aren't Smarter Than Mice, and That's Important

Boronx Re:Divergence (154 comments)

The arbitrariness of species is one of the realizations that lead to Darwin's book. It forms a key part of his argument. Divergence time means "time to last common ancestor". If we take these arbitrary groupings, and say these are mice, and these are rats, then we can take a rat and a mouse and use genetic tests to guess how long it has been since they shared an ancestor.

What we'll probably find, even though our initial grouping was arbitrary, that for the most part a given mouse and a given rat's common ancestor will be about as far in the past as any other pair of rat and mice.

5 days ago
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White House Wants Ideas For "Bootstrapping a Solar System Civilization"

Boronx Insurance (348 comments)

Provide low-cost federal insurance for colonization and asteroid mining missions, like we do for nuclear power plants.

5 days ago
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For Game Developers, It's About the Labor of Love

Boronx Re:But is this still a thing? (162 comments)

This is just you growing up and realizing video games pre-order has no value and is just a way of getting money from suckers. This has always been true. A couple of times a year this happens and each time a whole new batch of gamers is rudely awoken to this fact.

5 days ago
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VeraCrypt Is the New TrueCrypt -- and It's Better

Boronx Re:You'll give them the password (220 comments)

There's a difference between a written plea deal and the prosecutor bamboozling you in person.

about a week ago
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VeraCrypt Is the New TrueCrypt -- and It's Better

Boronx Re:Nope not suspicious at all (220 comments)

Undoubtedly somebody much smarter than the low-rent cryptologists they hire at the NSA.

about a week ago
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VeraCrypt Is the New TrueCrypt -- and It's Better

Boronx Re:You'll give them the password (220 comments)

Never make a deal with a prosecutor without a judge approved plea bargain.

A coworker was in a car accident with her sister driving. The prosecutor told her sister: "We're charing you with reckless driving. Just plead guilty and you'll get off with a small fine. I'll ask the judge to be lenient."

They charged her with assault on her own sister. Confused, she pled guilty anyway, like she said she would. The prosecutor asked for the maximum penalty which includes jail time, and got it.

about a week ago
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Former Department of Defense Chief Expects "30 Year War"

Boronx Re:Incompetent Administration (Thanks GWB) (425 comments)

All meaningless crap.

Saddam did not violate any ceasefire agreements in anyway that mattered to US interests.

Yeah, the US hates dictators. You have to got to be fucking kidding.

"The fault, however, is not in invading in the first place,"

Killing thousands upon thousands of people using a bunch of lies as the justification pretty much dooms the operation to failure from the beginning. Nobody is going to like that, and if nobody likes an invasion, it's going to fail. Also, killing innocent people is wrong all by itself. There's a reason starting wars is considered a criminal act.

about two weeks ago
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How President Nixon Saved/Wrecked the American Space Program

Boronx Re:Long Time (125 comments)

"Reagan's economic changes doomed Bush Sr due to debt but helped Clinton with a the good economy."

Thanks for the chuckle.

"But his support of a puppet in Iran led to a overthrow by an extremist regime that will be in power for decades more."

The revolution happened while Carter was president.

"Clinton's economic decisions are affecting us now through joblessness (Perot had it right - a big sucking sound as jobs leave)."

Perot was right, but it was Clinton's financial deregulation and capture of the remaining regulation that tanked the economy, and that's what caused the spike in unemployment. What NAFTA did was suck away *good* jobs.

"Bush Jr decisions will take at least another 10 years to pay off."

You ever hear of ISIS? The national debt? Massive wealth inequality?

about two weeks ago
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Physicist Claims Black Holes Mathematically Don't Exist

Boronx Re:Mathematically speaking... (356 comments)

The Colonel is dead, yet we still eat his chicken.

about a month ago
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Sci-fi Predictions, True and False (Video 1)

Boronx Re:Faulty premise (139 comments)

Gandalf's magic doesn't really have any effect on the story, except his foresight. Otherwise, he's just a formidable, wise old man.

His foresight is presented in a mystical, almost religious manner. The Lord of the Rings is not a book that asks the question "What if Wizards roamed the earth?" Instead, it says "Wasn't it great when the gods walked among us and told us what to do?"

about a month ago
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New Study Projects World Population of 11B by 2100

Boronx Re:No, It Won't (326 comments)

Which is socialist. You do not understand that capitalism and socialism are not opposites.

about a month ago
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New Study Projects World Population of 11B by 2100

Boronx Re:No, It Won't (326 comments)

"One of the interesting things about food is that no matter how rich or how poor you are you can only consume so much food."

Incorrect. Acquiring and destroying food is not the same as eating food.

'

about a month ago
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Why Atheists Need Captain Kirk

Boronx Re:Waaa? (937 comments)

Indeed. McCoy is a scientist by trade. Kirk, is not.

about a month ago
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Top EU Court: Libraries Can Digitize Books Without Publishers' Permission

Boronx Re:Well now. (102 comments)

Maybe advocates for those with disabilities will be able to broaden this ruling.

about a month ago
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Is There a Creativity Deficit In Science?

Boronx Re:The Trouble with Physics (203 comments)

Does the book go into detail on why string theory ate Physics?

about a month and a half ago
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Net Neutrality Is 'Marxist,' According To a Koch-Backed Astroturf Group

Boronx Re:Urgh (531 comments)

You need to be modded up, good sir or madame.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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Boronx Boronx writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Boronx writes "Compared with a law-and-order response to 9/11, President Bush's prosecution of the war on terrorism by executive fiat is the weaker of the two.

A legal response would have been nurtured by the law. In turn, it would have built into the system of law a bulwark against terrorism that would endure beyond any presidency and that would have inherant legitemacy here and abroad. Such a bulwark would have benefited from the slow but relentless accumulation of wisdom that is a halmark of our legal system.

Bush's war by fiat, or dictatorial war, is not nurtured by the law, but constantly threatened by it. It has already been slapped down by the courts in more than one place. Those components which have not been abandoned because of too much legal scrutiny, are in danger of being wholly dismantled by it at any time. If we have a new president in 2008 who is not attached to the policy, we are likely to see its total collapse. If the new president remains attached to the policy we will still see it erode towards utter uselessness.

Because Bush's policy is illegal in many parts, because it scorns legal responses to terrorism, it has not nurtured in growth in the law towards fighting terrorism. The opposite is true. Suspects that emerge from Bush's system are all but impossible to prosecute because of illegal detentions, lack of a chain of evidence, insufficient evidence, evidence tainted by torture, withholding of evidence for security reasons, partly to protect sources but also partly to protect the system from legal danger, and years wasted while the cases go cold.

Bush's reflexive secrecy, along with the dictatorial nature of the policy, stunt the accumulation of wisdom. Very few people have enough knowledge of the policies to offer constructive criticism, and since Bush has full control over it, his system will only benefit from what little wisdom comes its way if Bush manages to absorb it."
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Boronx Boronx writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Boronx writes "It seems that Bush's main selling point on Iraq today is that we can't afford to let his policy fail. What he really means is that he can't afford to admit that his policy is already failed. He also seems unable to allow that the American people, and more importantly the Iraqi people have had their say, or that their opinions matter.

BTW, why have I heard so much about how the Bush Administration is reacting to the ISG report, but nothing from Muqtada al Sadr, for example, or any other Iraqi? If the ISG is offensive to Iraqis, isn't the effort stillborn as a serious policy proposal?"

Journals

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War on Terrorism

Boronx Boronx writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Compared with a law-and-order response to 9/11, President Bush's prosecution of the war on terrorism by executive fiat is the weaker of the two.

A legal response would have been nurtured by the law. In turn, it would have built into the system of law a bulwark against terrorism that would endure beyond any presidency and that would have inherent legitimacy here and abroad. Such a bulwark would have benefited from the slow but relentless accumulation of wisdom that is a hallmark of our legal system.

Bush's war by fiat, or dictatorial war, is not nurtured by the law, but constantly threatened by it. It has already been slapped down by the courts in more than one place. Those components which have not been abandoned because of too much legal scrutiny, are in danger of being wholly dismantled by it at any time. If we have a new president in 2008 who is not attached to the policy, we are likely to see its total collapse. If the new president remains attached to the policy we will still see it erode towards utter uselessness.

Because Bush's policy is illegal in many parts, because it scorns legal responses to terrorism, it has not nurtured growth in the law towards fighting terrorism. The opposite is true. Suspects that emerge from Bush's system are all but impossible to prosecute because of illegal detentions, lack of a chain of evidence, insufficient evidence, evidence tainted by torture, withholding of evidence for security reasons, partly to protect sources but also partly to protect the system from legal danger, and years wasted while the cases go cold.

Bush's reflexive secrecy, along with the dictatorial nature of the policy, stunt the accumulation of wisdom. Very few people have enough knowledge of the policies to offer constructive criticism. Since Bush has full control over it, his system will only benefit from what little wisdom comes its way if Bush manages to absorb it.

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Iraq War

Boronx Boronx writes  |  more than 7 years ago

It seems that Bush's main selling point on Iraq today is that we can't afford to let his policy fail. What he really means is that he can't afford to admit that his policy is already failed. He also seems unable to allow that the American people, and more importantly the Iraqi people have had their say, or that their opinions matter.

BTW, why have I heard so much about how the Bush Administration is reacting to the ISG report, but nothing from Muqtada al Sadr, for example, or any other Iraqi? If the ISG is offensive to Iraqis, isn't the effort stillborn as a serious policy proposal?

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