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Alva Noe: Don't Worry About the Singularity, We Can't Even Copy an Amoeba

Boronx Submarine (442 comments)

"Asking whether a computer can think is like asking whether a submarine can swim."

--Djikstra

3 days ago
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Alva Noe: Don't Worry About the Singularity, We Can't Even Copy an Amoeba

Boronx Re:Armchair cognitive scientist (442 comments)

I think of it as a unconscious vestige of a belief in a soul. Such people can't really see themselves as a collection of cells which are a collection of molecules, even if consciously they affirm that belief. They probably still lay awake at night wondering what happens to us when we're dead.

3 days ago
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Alva Noe: Don't Worry About the Singularity, We Can't Even Copy an Amoeba

Boronx Re:Armchair cognitive scientist (442 comments)

What we have that Watson does not is a survival instinct that's been bred into us over a few billion years.

This could be programmed in, but there's not much reason to at the moment. NASA looked into self-repairing unmanned bases on the moon and other planets. Such an AI would have a survival instinct and would behave as more than a tool.

3 days ago
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Assassin's Creed: Unity Launch Debacle Pulls Spotlight Onto Game Review Embargos

Boronx Re:It's what some GG people SAY it's about (474 comments)

Game journalism will always need the support of the industry, because gamers want game porn far more than they want hard hitting investigative journalism on games.

That's not strong enough: *nobody* wants hard hitting investigative journalism on games. If gamergate really got what they say the wanted, what they would find out is how stupid, lost and uncivilized people in the game industry think gamergate types are.

Gamergate suffers from a problem common among those who take an entertainment medium too seriously: they think they are something that they are not.

about two weeks ago
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President Obama Backs Regulation of Broadband As a Utility

Boronx Re:Obama (706 comments)

There's no lists of people Obama murdered floating around. There's no special prosecutor trolling through Intern's panty drawers, there's no national press salivating over every leaked detail. There's no impeachment proceedings. Obama derangement is crazy, but not 1998 crazy.

"Clinton did lie. A lot."

They all lie, it's their job. Obama is one of the best at it.

about two weeks ago
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President Obama Backs Regulation of Broadband As a Utility

Boronx Re:Obama (706 comments)

The same could be said of Clinton and he was even more loathed by Republicans that Obama is. (Hard to believe, but those of us old enough to remember the '90s know how crazy the Clinton hate was.)

about two weeks ago
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The Effect of Programming Language On Software Quality

Boronx Re:Language (217 comments)

If data shows a possible advantage, we should not dismiss it out of hand.

"Most people stumble upon the truth, but usually they pick themselves up and move on as if nothing had happened."

This describes how much of slashdot handles new scientific information.

about three weeks ago
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Reactions To Disgusting Images Predict a Persons Political Ideology

Boronx Re:January 3rd (330 comments)

You must be new here. To the world, I mean.

about three weeks ago
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Reactions To Disgusting Images Predict a Persons Political Ideology

Boronx Re:are conservatives just showing more reaction? (330 comments)

You should read the paper. Conservative brains light up in areas associated with blaming immigrants, unions and Obama for the mess.

about three weeks ago
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Elon Musk Warns Against Unleashing Artificial Intelligence "Demon"

Boronx Re:Comment from an AI researcher (583 comments)

"government never thought that land mines would pose any sort of problem for future generations, and never thought that randomly bombing terrorist organizations would increase their number"

There's a difference between "never thought" and "did not care". Speaking of entities way more powerful and intelligent than a human that act amorally, governments don't care about dead kids from land mines very much, nor about terrorist acts except in how they affect poll numbers.

about a month ago
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Trans-Pacific Partnership May Endanger World Health, Newly Leaked Chapter Shows

Boronx Re:Cui bono? (132 comments)

Hey, you're right. Time to excise the Boston Tea Party out of the history books.

about a month ago
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Scientists Find Rats Aren't Smarter Than Mice, and That's Important

Boronx Re:Rat infestations harder to solve (154 comments)

Interesting. I've had the opposite result with mice. I can get the young ones easy, but the old wily ones I got to trick some how. The last infestation I had to deal with was 11 mice. The very last mouse I killed was this big fat misshapen guy who ran slowly and in a straight line. No dodging, no attempt to hide. I literally dropped a trap right in front of him and he walked into it.

My interpretation is that that mouse family was taking care of their disabled relative.

about a month ago
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Scientists Find Rats Aren't Smarter Than Mice, and That's Important

Boronx Re:Divergence (154 comments)

The arbitrariness of species is one of the realizations that lead to Darwin's book. It forms a key part of his argument. Divergence time means "time to last common ancestor". If we take these arbitrary groupings, and say these are mice, and these are rats, then we can take a rat and a mouse and use genetic tests to guess how long it has been since they shared an ancestor.

What we'll probably find, even though our initial grouping was arbitrary, that for the most part a given mouse and a given rat's common ancestor will be about as far in the past as any other pair of rat and mice.

about a month ago
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White House Wants Ideas For "Bootstrapping a Solar System Civilization"

Boronx Insurance (352 comments)

Provide low-cost federal insurance for colonization and asteroid mining missions, like we do for nuclear power plants.

about a month ago
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For Game Developers, It's About the Labor of Love

Boronx Re:But is this still a thing? (164 comments)

This is just you growing up and realizing video games pre-order has no value and is just a way of getting money from suckers. This has always been true. A couple of times a year this happens and each time a whole new batch of gamers is rudely awoken to this fact.

about a month ago
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VeraCrypt Is the New TrueCrypt -- and It's Better

Boronx Re:You'll give them the password (220 comments)

There's a difference between a written plea deal and the prosecutor bamboozling you in person.

about a month and a half ago
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VeraCrypt Is the New TrueCrypt -- and It's Better

Boronx Re:Nope not suspicious at all (220 comments)

Undoubtedly somebody much smarter than the low-rent cryptologists they hire at the NSA.

about a month and a half ago

Submissions

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Boronx Boronx writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Boronx writes "Compared with a law-and-order response to 9/11, President Bush's prosecution of the war on terrorism by executive fiat is the weaker of the two.

A legal response would have been nurtured by the law. In turn, it would have built into the system of law a bulwark against terrorism that would endure beyond any presidency and that would have inherant legitemacy here and abroad. Such a bulwark would have benefited from the slow but relentless accumulation of wisdom that is a halmark of our legal system.

Bush's war by fiat, or dictatorial war, is not nurtured by the law, but constantly threatened by it. It has already been slapped down by the courts in more than one place. Those components which have not been abandoned because of too much legal scrutiny, are in danger of being wholly dismantled by it at any time. If we have a new president in 2008 who is not attached to the policy, we are likely to see its total collapse. If the new president remains attached to the policy we will still see it erode towards utter uselessness.

Because Bush's policy is illegal in many parts, because it scorns legal responses to terrorism, it has not nurtured in growth in the law towards fighting terrorism. The opposite is true. Suspects that emerge from Bush's system are all but impossible to prosecute because of illegal detentions, lack of a chain of evidence, insufficient evidence, evidence tainted by torture, withholding of evidence for security reasons, partly to protect sources but also partly to protect the system from legal danger, and years wasted while the cases go cold.

Bush's reflexive secrecy, along with the dictatorial nature of the policy, stunt the accumulation of wisdom. Very few people have enough knowledge of the policies to offer constructive criticism, and since Bush has full control over it, his system will only benefit from what little wisdom comes its way if Bush manages to absorb it."
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Boronx Boronx writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Boronx writes "It seems that Bush's main selling point on Iraq today is that we can't afford to let his policy fail. What he really means is that he can't afford to admit that his policy is already failed. He also seems unable to allow that the American people, and more importantly the Iraqi people have had their say, or that their opinions matter.

BTW, why have I heard so much about how the Bush Administration is reacting to the ISG report, but nothing from Muqtada al Sadr, for example, or any other Iraqi? If the ISG is offensive to Iraqis, isn't the effort stillborn as a serious policy proposal?"

Journals

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War on Terrorism

Boronx Boronx writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Compared with a law-and-order response to 9/11, President Bush's prosecution of the war on terrorism by executive fiat is the weaker of the two.

A legal response would have been nurtured by the law. In turn, it would have built into the system of law a bulwark against terrorism that would endure beyond any presidency and that would have inherent legitimacy here and abroad. Such a bulwark would have benefited from the slow but relentless accumulation of wisdom that is a hallmark of our legal system.

Bush's war by fiat, or dictatorial war, is not nurtured by the law, but constantly threatened by it. It has already been slapped down by the courts in more than one place. Those components which have not been abandoned because of too much legal scrutiny, are in danger of being wholly dismantled by it at any time. If we have a new president in 2008 who is not attached to the policy, we are likely to see its total collapse. If the new president remains attached to the policy we will still see it erode towards utter uselessness.

Because Bush's policy is illegal in many parts, because it scorns legal responses to terrorism, it has not nurtured growth in the law towards fighting terrorism. The opposite is true. Suspects that emerge from Bush's system are all but impossible to prosecute because of illegal detentions, lack of a chain of evidence, insufficient evidence, evidence tainted by torture, withholding of evidence for security reasons, partly to protect sources but also partly to protect the system from legal danger, and years wasted while the cases go cold.

Bush's reflexive secrecy, along with the dictatorial nature of the policy, stunt the accumulation of wisdom. Very few people have enough knowledge of the policies to offer constructive criticism. Since Bush has full control over it, his system will only benefit from what little wisdom comes its way if Bush manages to absorb it.

top

Iraq War

Boronx Boronx writes  |  more than 7 years ago

It seems that Bush's main selling point on Iraq today is that we can't afford to let his policy fail. What he really means is that he can't afford to admit that his policy is already failed. He also seems unable to allow that the American people, and more importantly the Iraqi people have had their say, or that their opinions matter.

BTW, why have I heard so much about how the Bush Administration is reacting to the ISG report, but nothing from Muqtada al Sadr, for example, or any other Iraqi? If the ISG is offensive to Iraqis, isn't the effort stillborn as a serious policy proposal?

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