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Comments

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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

Boronx Re:Militia, then vs now (1570 comments)

You may be surprised to learn that there were many founders, some with different ideas, and that some of the language in the constitution is a compromise.

2 days ago
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants To 'Fix' the Second Amendment

Boronx Re:Militia, then vs now (1570 comments)

It does not exclude RPGs, stingers, or 100 lbs of high explosives.

2 days ago
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Mathematical Proof That the Cosmos Could Have Formed Spontaneously From Nothing

Boronx Re:"Something from Nothing" is not science (594 comments)

religion as a store of knowledge is extremely valuable. Theology as an intellectual pursuit is barren and answers none of the questions that science has so far failed to answer. This bickering over the word "nothing" is exactly the kind of nonsense that theologians get caught up in. The word itself is just a label. A good scientist understands that and no doubt the original papers don't use that word except as summary or shorthand for a more specific idea.

4 days ago
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Study Rules Out Global Warming Being a Natural Fluctuation With 99% Certainty

Boronx Re:more pseudo science (854 comments)

Yet another slashdotter unsure if scientists have heard of the Sun.

about a week ago
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Mathematical Proof That the Cosmos Could Have Formed Spontaneously From Nothing

Boronx Re:"Something from Nothing" is not science (594 comments)

Of course physicists have box envy. They've been stealing sand boxes since the beginning but they're always taking more. BTW, pretty much everything was the domain of theology until science gets in on the action, then the theologians end up looking petty and unimaginative once we find out what's really going on.

Why are you getting all stitched up about the word? It's not like theologians have any good theory about how something could come from nothing, or even if that's a question that needs answering.

about a week ago
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Mathematical Proof That the Cosmos Could Have Formed Spontaneously From Nothing

Boronx Re:Not possible (594 comments)

A probability wave is an actual physical thing, and not just an abstraction that describes our inability to make precise measurements. It's the very nature of the wave that the events caused by it are unpredictable.

about a week ago
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Mathematical Proof That the Cosmos Could Have Formed Spontaneously From Nothing

Boronx Re:Not possible (594 comments)

"Underlying this is an assumption that reality is not itself mathematical. This assumption isn't justified."

Sure there is. There is no model that describes what happens. We do have models that describe precisely how bad our models are. Current theory is that we can't do any better than that.

OTOH, I disagree with the grandparent. Physics has informed a lot of new Math, and Math has informed a lot of new physics.

about a week ago
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Mathematical Proof That the Cosmos Could Have Formed Spontaneously From Nothing

Boronx Re:"Something from Nothing" is not science (594 comments)

"I wish the physicists would stop playing in the philosophical and theological sandbox."

Of course you do. Theologians have already had their sandbox reduced by scientists, and you wouldn't want it to shrink any more than it already has.

about a week ago
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Nat Geo Writer: Science Is Running Out of "Great" Things To Discover

Boronx Re:I think he's right... (292 comments)

The fun force and the mental force.

about a week ago
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Australia May 'Pause' Trades To Tackle High-Frequency Trading

Boronx Re:TAX THEM! (342 comments)

Capital gains tax will ruin 'murka!

about two weeks ago
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How the Internet Is Taking Away America's Religion

Boronx Re:Knowledge (1037 comments)

Indeed, you need one to get the other.

about two weeks ago
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How the Internet Is Taking Away America's Religion

Boronx Re:Knowledge (1037 comments)

Any amount of evasion on any issue is possible, for sure. You can, however, disprove any specific idea about how the connection is made, and therefore any definition of soul that follows that pattern.

Also, I'm not sure how calling a soul a life essence helps. What the heck does that mean?

about two weeks ago
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How the Internet Is Taking Away America's Religion

Boronx Re:Knowledge (1037 comments)

That doesn't address at all what a soul is, it just moves it do a different location. Also, it's easily dis-proven by looking for the process that creates and maintains the connection.

about two weeks ago
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How the Internet Is Taking Away America's Religion

Boronx Re:Knowledge (1037 comments)

It's hugely educational. For instance, I just learned there are people who don't know how educational it is. Thanks, Internet!

about two weeks ago
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How the Internet Is Taking Away America's Religion

Boronx Re:Knowledge (1037 comments)

"Of course you can argue that there is no such thing as a soul, but proving that could be rather complicated."

Only because people aren't being clear on what a soul is. Try to come up with a definition of "soul" that

a) can't be easily disproven

and

b) is more than just a collection of verbs.

about two weeks ago
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How the Internet Is Taking Away America's Religion

Boronx Re:Knowledge (1037 comments)

Or, you know, he could have made child birth easy.

about two weeks ago
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It's Time To Bring Pseudoscience Into the Science Classroom

Boronx Re:The Religious Right will have your head on a pl (470 comments)

Your post is ironic since it's a pure straw-man attack. It's also just stupid. Can you find a school board anywhere that's pushing for astrology,etc. in the classroom?

about two weeks ago
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Waves Spotted On Titan

Boronx Re:Why doesn't it explode (73 comments)

It will, it's just been lucky so far. Don't live on Titan.

about 1 month ago

Submissions

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Boronx Boronx writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Boronx writes "Compared with a law-and-order response to 9/11, President Bush's prosecution of the war on terrorism by executive fiat is the weaker of the two.

A legal response would have been nurtured by the law. In turn, it would have built into the system of law a bulwark against terrorism that would endure beyond any presidency and that would have inherant legitemacy here and abroad. Such a bulwark would have benefited from the slow but relentless accumulation of wisdom that is a halmark of our legal system.

Bush's war by fiat, or dictatorial war, is not nurtured by the law, but constantly threatened by it. It has already been slapped down by the courts in more than one place. Those components which have not been abandoned because of too much legal scrutiny, are in danger of being wholly dismantled by it at any time. If we have a new president in 2008 who is not attached to the policy, we are likely to see its total collapse. If the new president remains attached to the policy we will still see it erode towards utter uselessness.

Because Bush's policy is illegal in many parts, because it scorns legal responses to terrorism, it has not nurtured in growth in the law towards fighting terrorism. The opposite is true. Suspects that emerge from Bush's system are all but impossible to prosecute because of illegal detentions, lack of a chain of evidence, insufficient evidence, evidence tainted by torture, withholding of evidence for security reasons, partly to protect sources but also partly to protect the system from legal danger, and years wasted while the cases go cold.

Bush's reflexive secrecy, along with the dictatorial nature of the policy, stunt the accumulation of wisdom. Very few people have enough knowledge of the policies to offer constructive criticism, and since Bush has full control over it, his system will only benefit from what little wisdom comes its way if Bush manages to absorb it."
top

Boronx Boronx writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Boronx writes "It seems that Bush's main selling point on Iraq today is that we can't afford to let his policy fail. What he really means is that he can't afford to admit that his policy is already failed. He also seems unable to allow that the American people, and more importantly the Iraqi people have had their say, or that their opinions matter.

BTW, why have I heard so much about how the Bush Administration is reacting to the ISG report, but nothing from Muqtada al Sadr, for example, or any other Iraqi? If the ISG is offensive to Iraqis, isn't the effort stillborn as a serious policy proposal?"

Journals

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War on Terrorism

Boronx Boronx writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Compared with a law-and-order response to 9/11, President Bush's prosecution of the war on terrorism by executive fiat is the weaker of the two.

A legal response would have been nurtured by the law. In turn, it would have built into the system of law a bulwark against terrorism that would endure beyond any presidency and that would have inherent legitimacy here and abroad. Such a bulwark would have benefited from the slow but relentless accumulation of wisdom that is a hallmark of our legal system.

Bush's war by fiat, or dictatorial war, is not nurtured by the law, but constantly threatened by it. It has already been slapped down by the courts in more than one place. Those components which have not been abandoned because of too much legal scrutiny, are in danger of being wholly dismantled by it at any time. If we have a new president in 2008 who is not attached to the policy, we are likely to see its total collapse. If the new president remains attached to the policy we will still see it erode towards utter uselessness.

Because Bush's policy is illegal in many parts, because it scorns legal responses to terrorism, it has not nurtured growth in the law towards fighting terrorism. The opposite is true. Suspects that emerge from Bush's system are all but impossible to prosecute because of illegal detentions, lack of a chain of evidence, insufficient evidence, evidence tainted by torture, withholding of evidence for security reasons, partly to protect sources but also partly to protect the system from legal danger, and years wasted while the cases go cold.

Bush's reflexive secrecy, along with the dictatorial nature of the policy, stunt the accumulation of wisdom. Very few people have enough knowledge of the policies to offer constructive criticism. Since Bush has full control over it, his system will only benefit from what little wisdom comes its way if Bush manages to absorb it.

top

Iraq War

Boronx Boronx writes  |  more than 7 years ago

It seems that Bush's main selling point on Iraq today is that we can't afford to let his policy fail. What he really means is that he can't afford to admit that his policy is already failed. He also seems unable to allow that the American people, and more importantly the Iraqi people have had their say, or that their opinions matter.

BTW, why have I heard so much about how the Bush Administration is reacting to the ISG report, but nothing from Muqtada al Sadr, for example, or any other Iraqi? If the ISG is offensive to Iraqis, isn't the effort stillborn as a serious policy proposal?

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