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Comments

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The Daily Harassment of Women In the Game Industry

Boronx Re:How do you (755 comments)

If it's not true for you, then you aren't part of the problem.

yesterday
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The Daily Harassment of Women In the Game Industry

Boronx Re:Pft (755 comments)

Uh yeah. In case you didn't notice, men killing women is kind of a problem.

yesterday
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Exodus Intelligence Details Zero-Day Vulnerabilities In Tails OS

Boronx Re:Wait, wait... (129 comments)

Response to parent post, you brain-dead moron.

yesterday
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Exodus Intelligence Details Zero-Day Vulnerabilities In Tails OS

Boronx Re:Wait, wait... (129 comments)

Libertarianism run amok. Apparently the need to stay in business trumps any moral concerns.

yesterday
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The AI Boss That Deploys Hong Kong's Subway Engineers

Boronx Re:Management is becoming obsolete (162 comments)

Grandparent post still stands. These reviewers will gradually be replaced by others who never had any experience scheduling the work.

about two weeks ago
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The AI Boss That Deploys Hong Kong's Subway Engineers

Boronx Re:Expert System (162 comments)

That's backwards. Philosophy only solves its nagging questions by *resorting* to math or logic or science.

about two weeks ago
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The AI Boss That Deploys Hong Kong's Subway Engineers

Boronx Re:Expert System (162 comments)

The trend suggests that in the limiting case, humans are not intelligent.

about two weeks ago
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Teaching Creationism As Science Now Banned In Britain's Schools

Boronx Re:Finally! (649 comments)

I suspect this is a backlash against Muslims as much as it is an embracing of best practices.

about a month ago
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The Profoundly Weird, Gender-Specific Roots of the Turing Test

Boronx Re:Wow (136 comments)

Let's face it. If you're a guy chatting with a woman, you don't want to find out she's really a dude.

about a month ago
top

Aliens and the Fermi Paradox

Boronx Re:Progenitors? (686 comments)

Yeah, I don't remember the exact speed, I think it was 1/10th light speed, which makes the travel time small compared to time before a colony spawns new colonies. Assuming habitable planets are dense, that is.

about a month ago
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Aliens and the Fermi Paradox

Boronx Re:Progenitors? (686 comments)

One calculation I saw was that if a single space faring race spread out ward slower than the speed of light, only to nearby stars, with a 200 year growth period for new colonies before they started new colonies, that species would colonize every habitable planet in the galaxy in 1 Billion years. So your idea doesn't really solve the problem.

about a month and a half ago
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Aliens and the Fermi Paradox

Boronx Re: Progenitors? (686 comments)

We weren't always so successful. I'm guessing the problem with intelligence is a long childhood with a necessary period of making a lot of bonehead mistakes, because each generation has to learn everything over again.

about a month and a half ago
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Was Turing Test Legitimately Beaten, Or Just Cleverly Tricked?

Boronx Re:F&%ken CS people (309 comments)

Now if you manage that, try expressing it outside of a language so it can be evaluated. Now imagine building computer to be "artificially" "intellegent" without a language. Even if there was some form that was not based in language (by the way, not just talking human language), how would you test that? How would that computer be "correct" or "mistaken"?

Stanislaw Lem's Solaris is an imaginative take on a similar problem.

about a month and a half ago
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Was Turing Test Legitimately Beaten, Or Just Cleverly Tricked?

Boronx Re:No, not over-hyped at all... (309 comments)

Ask a human which seven letter word is the hardest to read? What kind of fruit have they seen the most? The algorithmic solution to problems that at one point were clearly in the domain of intelligence is starting to become a pattern. Yeah, each solution on it's own is extremely limited, but human intelligence is starting to seem limited, too.

The trend feels like science versus religion. By the 19th century, science had made huge strides in explaining how the universe works, but there was a huge, overwhelming issue that made God still dominant as an idea. The vast, beautiful, complex and and endlessly varied sea of life was inexplicable. Then Darwin came along with an idea that was dead simple, and all of a sudden there was nothing left. God receded back to before the beginning of time.

about a month and a half ago
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Was Turing Test Legitimately Beaten, Or Just Cleverly Tricked?

Boronx Re:but that's the problem with the turing test... (309 comments)

Some one compared the current versions of the Turing test to a hypothetical flying competition in the days of Da Vinci. To make things simple, the prize goes to the machine that gets the furthest off the ground. Some joker wins the competition with a pair of springs tied to his feet (Eliza). The next year, all the entries are bigger, better springs.

about a month and a half ago
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Daniel Ellsberg: Snowden Would Not Get a Fair Trial – and Kerry Is Wrong

Boronx Re:The Ukraine and all. (519 comments)

Look at Ukraine now and one year ago. Who is who's bitch again?

about 2 months ago
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Daniel Ellsberg: Snowden Would Not Get a Fair Trial – and Kerry Is Wrong

Boronx Re:Obama, Kerry, et al. (519 comments)

Snowden has already helped. All of the fascists who think the spying is ok and that Snowden should be hanged used to be telling us there was no way the NSA spying could be as bad as we thought.

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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Boronx Boronx writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Boronx writes "Compared with a law-and-order response to 9/11, President Bush's prosecution of the war on terrorism by executive fiat is the weaker of the two.

A legal response would have been nurtured by the law. In turn, it would have built into the system of law a bulwark against terrorism that would endure beyond any presidency and that would have inherant legitemacy here and abroad. Such a bulwark would have benefited from the slow but relentless accumulation of wisdom that is a halmark of our legal system.

Bush's war by fiat, or dictatorial war, is not nurtured by the law, but constantly threatened by it. It has already been slapped down by the courts in more than one place. Those components which have not been abandoned because of too much legal scrutiny, are in danger of being wholly dismantled by it at any time. If we have a new president in 2008 who is not attached to the policy, we are likely to see its total collapse. If the new president remains attached to the policy we will still see it erode towards utter uselessness.

Because Bush's policy is illegal in many parts, because it scorns legal responses to terrorism, it has not nurtured in growth in the law towards fighting terrorism. The opposite is true. Suspects that emerge from Bush's system are all but impossible to prosecute because of illegal detentions, lack of a chain of evidence, insufficient evidence, evidence tainted by torture, withholding of evidence for security reasons, partly to protect sources but also partly to protect the system from legal danger, and years wasted while the cases go cold.

Bush's reflexive secrecy, along with the dictatorial nature of the policy, stunt the accumulation of wisdom. Very few people have enough knowledge of the policies to offer constructive criticism, and since Bush has full control over it, his system will only benefit from what little wisdom comes its way if Bush manages to absorb it."
top

Boronx Boronx writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Boronx writes "It seems that Bush's main selling point on Iraq today is that we can't afford to let his policy fail. What he really means is that he can't afford to admit that his policy is already failed. He also seems unable to allow that the American people, and more importantly the Iraqi people have had their say, or that their opinions matter.

BTW, why have I heard so much about how the Bush Administration is reacting to the ISG report, but nothing from Muqtada al Sadr, for example, or any other Iraqi? If the ISG is offensive to Iraqis, isn't the effort stillborn as a serious policy proposal?"

Journals

top

War on Terrorism

Boronx Boronx writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Compared with a law-and-order response to 9/11, President Bush's prosecution of the war on terrorism by executive fiat is the weaker of the two.

A legal response would have been nurtured by the law. In turn, it would have built into the system of law a bulwark against terrorism that would endure beyond any presidency and that would have inherent legitimacy here and abroad. Such a bulwark would have benefited from the slow but relentless accumulation of wisdom that is a hallmark of our legal system.

Bush's war by fiat, or dictatorial war, is not nurtured by the law, but constantly threatened by it. It has already been slapped down by the courts in more than one place. Those components which have not been abandoned because of too much legal scrutiny, are in danger of being wholly dismantled by it at any time. If we have a new president in 2008 who is not attached to the policy, we are likely to see its total collapse. If the new president remains attached to the policy we will still see it erode towards utter uselessness.

Because Bush's policy is illegal in many parts, because it scorns legal responses to terrorism, it has not nurtured growth in the law towards fighting terrorism. The opposite is true. Suspects that emerge from Bush's system are all but impossible to prosecute because of illegal detentions, lack of a chain of evidence, insufficient evidence, evidence tainted by torture, withholding of evidence for security reasons, partly to protect sources but also partly to protect the system from legal danger, and years wasted while the cases go cold.

Bush's reflexive secrecy, along with the dictatorial nature of the policy, stunt the accumulation of wisdom. Very few people have enough knowledge of the policies to offer constructive criticism. Since Bush has full control over it, his system will only benefit from what little wisdom comes its way if Bush manages to absorb it.

top

Iraq War

Boronx Boronx writes  |  more than 7 years ago

It seems that Bush's main selling point on Iraq today is that we can't afford to let his policy fail. What he really means is that he can't afford to admit that his policy is already failed. He also seems unable to allow that the American people, and more importantly the Iraqi people have had their say, or that their opinions matter.

BTW, why have I heard so much about how the Bush Administration is reacting to the ISG report, but nothing from Muqtada al Sadr, for example, or any other Iraqi? If the ISG is offensive to Iraqis, isn't the effort stillborn as a serious policy proposal?

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