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Comments

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FCC Chair: It's Ok For ISPs To Discriminate Traffic

Brett Glass Re:What Internet? (365 comments)

Our ISP is in a distant rural area, and the peering point to which we connect is not one of the ones where Netflix peers. We need to cache; this is the situation that caches are for. But just as banks will only give you a loan if you don't need it, Netflix will only give you a server if you don't need it.

about a year ago
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FCC Chair: It's Ok For ISPs To Discriminate Traffic

Brett Glass Re:What Internet? (365 comments)

My small ISP asked Netflix for a cache, but was refused. Apparently, unless you're a huge ISP like Comcast, Verizon, or AT&T, Netflix won't let you set up a storage node.... And they won't let you cache on your own, either. In short, if you are small enough to need a cache, you can't have one.

about a year ago
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Verizon's Plan To Turn the Web Into Pay-Per-View

Brett Glass Re:The author is either a shill or a pawn of Googl (332 comments)

ISPs have no problems with their business models. It's Google who has a problem with their business models... if there's a penny left on the table that Google (which is the force behind the regulations) can't grab. Or if ISPs, who build the Internet, actually get to make something for their hard work.

about a year ago
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Verizon's Plan To Turn the Web Into Pay-Per-View

Brett Glass Re:The author is either a shill or a pawn of Googl (332 comments)

The user is not paying us for the bandwidth or duty cycle to run a server. The content provider is hoping that we won't notice and that it can effectively become an unauthorized, non-paying user of our network resources. Google has had P2P built into the Flash player for use by YouTube, incidentally.

about a year ago
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Verizon's Plan To Turn the Web Into Pay-Per-View

Brett Glass Re:The author is either a shill or a pawn of Googl (332 comments)

You, the user -- especially if you are a typical, naive user -- have no idea how much bandwidth you are using. Nor do you know whether the app you downloaded just to "access" a service actually turns your computer into a server, which the content provider hopes will be hosted on the ISP's network for free. ISPs are not making massive profits -- in part due to shenanigans such as these. But Google has multiple monopolies and is making billions.

about a year ago
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Verizon's Plan To Turn the Web Into Pay-Per-View

Brett Glass The author is either a shill or a pawn of Google (332 comments)

Total BS. As the operator of an ISP (and a former columnist for InfoWorld who was dismissed because I didn't go along with Microsoft's monopoly propaganda... not much different from monopolist Google's fearmongering above), I can say with authority that no ISP wants to limit what sites users can visit. That's the scare tactics that the lobbyists are using to push so-called "network neutrality" regulations, which are not neutral at all; they're designed to tip the economic balance away from ISPs and toward content companies such as Google. The regulations prohibit ISPs from charging more when content providers waste bandwidth or attempt to demand priority delivery of their content -- in short, when they ask for something for nothing. They also prevent ISPs from blocking software that exploits the ISP's network for the benefit of a content provider. In short, they're all about regulating the Internet in ways that benefit powerful corporations. Worse still, they let the camel's nose into the tent. If the FCC can regulate the Net to advantage Google, it can also regulate it in other harmful ways. Want to see censorship? Government blocking of sites? Even more intense spying on your Internet activities? If these regulations are not overturned, the precedent will open the door to all of those things.

about a year ago
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House Votes To Overturn FCC On Net Neutrality

Brett Glass Re:ISPs can't "regulate" anything. (388 comments)

Do you have cellular service? From how many providers? All are broadband competitors. Can you see the sky? Then satellite is another. How many WISPs operate in your area? All of them can beat the performance of DSL. It is highly unlikely that you actually have only two options.

more than 3 years ago
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House Votes To Overturn FCC On Net Neutrality

Brett Glass ISPs can't "regulate" anything. (388 comments)

There's too much competition. I live in a small, rural town of 28,000 souls, and we have 12 (count them!) facilities-based ISPs and more non-facilities-based ones. ISPs know that if they do anything that riles customers, those customers are history.

On the other hand, every government that's gotten control of the Internet in its country has censored it. Without exception.

more than 3 years ago
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GOP Senators Move To Block FCC On Net Neutrality

Brett Glass Nope; the FCC is trying to pay Google back... (709 comments)

...for the nearly $1 million that Google gave to the Obama campaign and the similar amount that it gave to the Obama transition team. Not to mention the more than $100K it gave for the inauguration. The so-called "network neutrality" rules proposed by the FCC aren't the slightest bit neutral; they'd tie ISPs' hands while giving control of the Net's future to Google and preventing newcomers from arising to challenge Google's monopolies. And no wonder: they were written by Google lobbyists whom Obama -- breaking his pledge not to hire lobbyists -- hired into the administration. What's more, at least one of the FCC Commissioners -- Michael Copps, the most senior and the one who was Interim Chairman -- has already stated that he wants to use these new regulatory powers to censor the Net. (He's the one who went ballistic over the exposure of Janet Jackson's pastie at the Super Bowl many years ago.) ISPs won't censor the Net; in fact, they have NEVER censored legal content. But the FCC, given the power, will follow in the footsteps of the Australian government and will try to do so.

more than 4 years ago
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Ford's New Cars To Be Wi-Fi Hotspots

Brett Glass hny im txting frm car (196 comments)

rd is wet and icy oops aaaaaaaaagh

more than 4 years ago
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Netbooks Have Higher Failure Rate Than Laptops

Brett Glass 100% Failure Rate with Apple MacOS (264 comments)

Unfortunately, Atom-based Netbooks have a 100% failure rate with the latest updates to "Snow Leopard." :-S

more than 4 years ago
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Facebook Ordered To Turn Over Source Code

Brett Glass Prior Art (304 comments)

Gee, I guess that they're going to have to go after the publisher of PackRat (AKA Tornado Notes), because it did the same thing way back in 1985, on MS-DOS, with no GUI. Oh, waitaminnit.... That pre-dates the patent by nearly a decade.

more than 5 years ago
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Conviction of Sen. Ted Stevens Is Thrown Out

Brett Glass Our legal system... (440 comments)

...is obviously just a series of tubes.

more than 5 years ago
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How Moore's Law Saved Us From the Gopher Web

Brett Glass Completely bogus argument (239 comments)

There's only one problem with Topolski's argument: it's completely bogus. In fact, it is revisionist history. Network administrators, at the time, were cheering the release of something more powerful and flexible than Gopher (which UMN had just decided it was going to try to license for money). Here's the truth behind Topolski's nonsense. The reason Topolski is making this tenuous, bogus argument is that he has just been hired by a Washington, DC lobbying group called the New America Foundation. This group is what's known as an "astroturf group." It pretends to be populist, but in fact is funded by big corporate money and promotes agendas that those corporations tell it to promote. In the case of the "New America Foundation," this is quite blatant: the Chairman of the group is Eric Schmidt, the CEO of GoogleClick (Google, which has merged with DoubleClick and is therefore the world's largest invader of Web users' privacy). Schmidt he has funneled more than $1 million of Google's money to the group. The group, in turn, parrots Google's corporate agenda to the letter. As does Topolski. Both Google and Topolski are seeking to regulate the Internet in ways that benefit Google at others' expense. In particular, the legislation which Google favors would force ISPs to raise prices, harm or even destroy competitive Internet service providers (leaving a cable/telco duopoly), and harm all Internet users' quality of service. In short, this is a corporate scam. Don't fall for it.

more than 5 years ago
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Boxee Drops Hulu Support

Brett Glass Boxee should drop BitTorrent (375 comments)

One of the reasons Boxee may well have more problems like this is that it supports BitTorrent. By doing P2P, it acts as a server on the customer's Internet connection 24x7, which is likely not only to slow the connection but to expose the user to penalty charges for exceeding caps. And it violates ISPs' terms of service as well. (That's not to mention the fact that BitTorrent is mostly used for illegal downloading. The Boxee is said only to point to "legal" trackers, but can easily be pointed at illegal ones.) Finally, most users of the Boxee are completely naive about the fact that their Internet connections are being co-opted to serve up content -- a serious disclosure issue. If it didn't do P2P, the Boxee might do a lot better.

more than 5 years ago
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Should Obama Give Stimulus To Open Source?

Brett Glass So, let me get this straight. (525 comments)

I, a software developer, should pony up tax dollars to be used to create software that competes with what I create? And this will somehow stimulate the economy?

more than 5 years ago
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Twisted Radio Beams Could Untangle the Airwaves

Brett Glass Wouldn't prevent interference (183 comments)

The problem with a circularly polarized signal is that it is not orthogonal to any linearly polarized one. In other words, while two linearly cross-polarized signals won't interfere with one another, any linearly polarized signal will interfere with all circularly polarized ones. So, this technique won't help to avoid interference on the airwaves.

more than 5 years ago
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WISPS Mean Cable and DSL Aren't the Only Choices

Brett Glass Re:WISP? more like WISH (256 comments)

Ted, sounds like you need a better WISP. Ours has none of those problems.

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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Thought you had no alternatives for broadband?

Brett Glass Brett Glass writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Brett Glass writes "Feel like you're stuck with a no-win choice between expensive cable modem service and slow DSL for Internet? Currently using satellite, with long latencies that make it impossible to do VoIP or interactive gaming? One of America's best kept secrets, so it seems, is the wide coverage of WISPs — terrestrial (not satellite or cellular) wireless broadband Internet providers. This article gives an overview of WISPs and provides a handy map showing their nationwide coverage (more than 750,000 square miles of the continental US — and only about one third of the WISPs in the US are on the map so far). Most WISPs are small, independent, consumer-friendly, and tech savvy, making them a better choice than big, corporate ISPs who can't even tell a penny from a dollar."
Link to Original Source
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FCC Commissioner: Don't regulate the Internet

Brett Glass Brett Glass writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Brett Glass writes "In an op-ed in today's Washington Post, FCC Commissioner Robert McDowell makes a case against government regulation of the Internet, opining that "engineers, not politicians or bureaucrats, should solve engineering problems." With state governments pressuring ISPs to pull the plug on Usenset, and a proposal now in play for censored public Internet, he may have a very good point."
Link to Original Source

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