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Comments

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Google Receives Takedown Request Every 8 Milliseconds

BronsCon Re:An easy fix. (70 comments)

put a punishment for flinging out fradulent DMCA takedown in the same way filing frivilous lawsuits is punished.

In other words, a slap on the wrist and a stern talking-to? Yeah, that'll work.

6 minutes ago
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Google Receives Takedown Request Every 8 Milliseconds

BronsCon Re:Its a smokescreen (70 comments)

Or, they throw up a red flag that the system is being abused, giving our elected representatives cause to take away this special gift that has been given to the copyright lobby.

8 minutes ago
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Google Receives Takedown Request Every 8 Milliseconds

BronsCon Re:Well... (70 comments)

That's unfair to someone filing a legitimate request. Instead, charge a larger sum, on the order of $5 per request, plus $1 per notice (to encourage notices to be batched into single requests and reduce your payment processing costs), with a limit of, say, 100 notices per request, and hold that amount in escrow. Once the window for dispute closes, refund the collected per-notice fee for each request not successfully disputed; if no notices are successfully disputed, also refund the request fee (minus your payment processing costs).

You'll almost immediately see companies start sending notices in batches of 100 (at a potential cost of $105) to reduce the cost of valid notices to just the cost of processing a $105 payment, something on the order of $3, versus the cost of processing 100 $6 payments, which is on the order of $25. You'll also see a sharp decrease in false notices, since one false notice in a batch would cost $6, with each additional false notice in that batch costing $1. I'm sure there would still be enough of them to pay for staff to process all of the incoming requests, though, which would be a win for everyone; the companies having to process the requests wouldn't be out the cost of doing so, and the requests themselves would pay for enough staff to process them in a timely manner, which should make the people filing them quite happy.

Of course, the law would have to allow for this, which I don't think it does at this point. Sadly.

9 minutes ago
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Google Receives Takedown Request Every 8 Milliseconds

BronsCon Re:Faulty logic (70 comments)

GoDaddy filed a DMCA request against one of my sites a few years back. The site was comprised of entirely original, all-text content (e.g. no images they could claim ownership of, and text entirely from my own fingers), but they didn't like the subject matter (a complaint regarding how they handle user-initiated termination of their domain privacy services), so, rather than contact me to resolve the issue (I had been unable to contact anyone on their end who could do anything for me) they fired off a DMCA takedown request to my VPS provider.

My VPS provider, being a reasonable company, saw that I was hosting several sites and, rather than take down the instance, forwarded the request to me. I contacted them to inform them that I intended to dispute the request and that no content would be removed as a result, they write back indicating that they figured that's what I would do and fully understood as they agreed the request was bogus. I CC'd GoDaddy's support team on that email, as well.

GoDaddy's next move was to file a WHOIS data inaccuracy complaint with ICANN. My next move was to CC their support team on my response to that.

In the end, I got a call from their VP of corporate development, or some such, who was able to immediately resolve my issue and light a fire under the dev team's ass to fix the issue permanently, and I took the site down. Had they worked with me from the start, the site never would have existed in the first place, but that's apparently not how GoDaddy (and, as is clear if you follow the news, other large corporations) wants to run things; they'd rather throw money out the window playing games and bullying people, instead of working with them to solve actual problems people have with their services.

In the end, the 20+ domains I had registered through them ended up on a different registrar and they got some bad PR and a perpetual negative review from me when people ask me (and they often do) who they should register their domains through or host their website with.

about half an hour ago
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Ebola Quarantine Center In Liberia Looted

BronsCon Re:Motive? (355 comments)

I'm in no way defending the use of the word, but I do want to point out that there has been somewhat of a movement, in the past few years, to redefine it to refer to a class, rather than a race. This is very much something I'd expect that particular class of people to do, regardless is the color of their skin; and I dare say that I know people of all races who are members of that class, just as I know people of all races who are not. Hell, in some areas I've lived in, most of them are white.

That said, its use in this thread probably *is* racist; typically when someone utters the word, outside of their small group of friends who have already agreed on the refined definition, that's the intent.

2 days ago
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Hemp Fibers Make Better Supercapacitors Than Graphene

BronsCon Re:Legal... sort of (177 comments)

Not with proper crop rotation. It's sad that most large commercial farms have forgotten this and, instead, must suck on the petroleum teat to sustain their crops.

5 days ago
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How to Maintain Lab Safety While Making Viruses Deadlier

BronsCon Re:So ... (213 comments)

I disagree. What they're doing in that lab is rearranging bit of virus and seeing what happens; analogous to rearranging bits of code and seeing what happens. That is, they want to know, given what already exists, and its propensity for auto-morphology, how worried should we be? It's essentially the same as asking "what's the worst that can happen if the instructions of Hello World are executed out of order?" except that we can't read the code for the virus (well, we can, but we don't understand enough of the biological "instruction set" it runs on to know what any of it means) and, so, we can't just rearrange it in our editor and step through it like we can with Hello World, we have to compile and execute.

That's why Hello World is not a viable replacement for fdisk in this type of research.

about a week ago
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T-Mobile To Throttle Customers Who Use Unlimited LTE Data For Torrents/P2P

BronsCon Re:In before (147 comments)

Like I said, I won't be at all surprised to get the call if/when I do.

about a week ago
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T-Mobile To Throttle Customers Who Use Unlimited LTE Data For Torrents/P2P

BronsCon Re:In before (147 comments)

Actually, they're pretty clear about their terms of use, and there's no restriction on the *amount* of data, so it is, in fact, unlimited. I'm saying this as an affected user; I fully expect to get a call from T-Mobile about my data usage, as I'm uploading >10GB/mo via an automated process, and have been doing so for the past year or so. Honestly, I've been expecting the call for some time, so I'll actually be surprised if I don't get it sometime this year.

That said, the process in question is uploading video to YouTube, so it's just as likely they won't flag it because it's not continuous and it's not P2P.

I do know that AT&T cut my wife's grandfathered unlimited data down to 2GB, with a warning and throttling at that point, while charging her the same price I was paying for 4GB on the same account. That's one of the reasons we're no longer with them. T-Mobile isn't doing that here, and I really have no complaints with how they're handling it; I'm surprised they didn't do it sooner.

about a week ago
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Samsung Announces Galaxy Alpha Featuring Metal Frame and Rounded Corners

BronsCon Re:New Design Approach (220 comments)

Bravo! Excellent explanation! It also highlights the fanboi mentality (theirs, not yours) fairly well, as well.

about a week ago
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Samsung Announces Galaxy Alpha Featuring Metal Frame and Rounded Corners

BronsCon Re:New Design Approach (220 comments)

How, exactly does anything Samsung makes look like an iPhone? I didn't say it looked like an iPhone, I said it looks more like an iPhone than anything Samsung has ever made. You have not disproven this.

about a week ago
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Samsung Announces Galaxy Alpha Featuring Metal Frame and Rounded Corners

BronsCon Re:New Design Approach (220 comments)

The BlackBerry Z10 looks much more like an iPhone than anything Samsung has ever made, but I don't hear Apple (or anyone, really) saying a thing about it. Why is that? In fact, the BlackBerry Z30 looks an awful lot like the HTC One M7 (from the front, at least) which, itself, looks a lot like an iPhone (again, from the front).

Not a word about BlackBerry copying Apple, or copying HTC, who copied Apple, or, hell, even HTC copying Apple. In an ironic twist, the upcoming iPhone 6 looks a lot like the HTC One M8 that came out in March, but, again, not a word of that from anyone.

about a week ago
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John McAfee Airs His Beefs About Privacy In Def Con Surprise Talk

BronsCon Re:The NSA is s spy agency (124 comments)

I don't have an opinion on Snowden, honestly. Part of me wants to call him a traitor, as he did reveal information about clandestine operations, but part of me thinks him a hero for revealing the same information about homeland-based activities. I love this country, but I hate its government with a passion... and, as I'm related to a federal employee, I'm not worried about this post landing me on any watch list; I'm already on most of them. God Bless America.

about two weeks ago
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John McAfee Airs His Beefs About Privacy In Def Con Surprise Talk

BronsCon Re: Why? (124 comments)

As much as the opposing members of Congress will allow. That is to say, not much, but more than nothing.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Life Beyond the WRT54G Series?

BronsCon Re:Option: Linksys WRT1900ac (426 comments)

Even "better"... I has a Belkin router a while back that had about a 10 foot range. I lived in the middle of nowhere, so interference wasn't an issue.

about two weeks ago
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Long-Wave Radar Can Take the Stealth From Stealth Technology

BronsCon Re:it's not a typo! (275 comments)

and the second o in the "too" in "too late"

about two weeks ago
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California Man Sues Sony Because Killzone: Shadowfall Isn't Really 1080p

BronsCon Re:They deserve it (286 comments)

Most progressive TV's will upscale each field to 1080p (de-interlace) and only one field displays at a time

You're talking about the alignment of the half-resolution frame. The TV's already account for that.

Which is it? Because those two comments, both from your own fingers, represent completely opposing positions. If the fields are upscaled (height doubled) and displayed independently of each other, as in the first quote, then you get the oscillation I was talking about. the second quote is absolutely correct and I'm glad to see you've realized that you were wrong; a little disappointed that you expressed that realization in the form of an argument, but satisfied nonetheless.

With modern de-interlacing algorithms, it's much easier to just think of it as double-framerate at half-resolution, since that's what the TV will do.

Modern de-interlacing algorithms? You mean the ones your media player application offers you in its configuration? If you have an interlaced stream that starts with an odd field, weaving fields into full frames will always result in better quality. If the stream starts with an odd frame, it's possible that the stream was improperly edited, or that the fields are reversed on all frames; in the first case, you can simply discard the first field, while in the other case, you just reverse the rendering order of the fields, but you still end up weaving them together. A broadcast stream will always have markers every keyframe or so to indicate its resolution, whether it's progressive or interlaced, and, if interlaced, field order, so broadcast interlaced video can always be properly de-interlaced. "Modern" de-interlacing algorithms are designed around simply not knowing and not being able to tell, in an automated way, what they're dealing with, which is important in a media player, since you can't rely on the random files users will throw at you to have proper metadata; their aim is not quality, it's ease of use.

That's what CRT's essentially did, but had phosphor fade to help them.

Well, yes, that's precisely what CRTs did. They skipped the width of one scanline (a little more, or less, if not properly calibrated) between each scanline while rendering one field, then rendered the following field in between. This is still the only *proper* way to de-interlace interlaced video, anything else is just compensating for not knowing if the content its display is (properly) interlaced or not.

about two weeks ago
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California Man Sues Sony Because Killzone: Shadowfall Isn't Really 1080p

BronsCon Re:They deserve it (286 comments)

I'm aware that some content is shot interlaced, but that does not matter here. You're oversimplifying by saying they're just lower-res frames; they're also comprised of alternating lines of the scene, and treating them simply as lower-res frames leads to (and I'm repeating myself, here)

an image that appears to oscillate at your framerate (up on the even fields and down on the odd)

Don't believe me? Go find an old NTSC camcorder, doesn't matter if it's a consumer or pro model, whether it originally sold for $100 to $100,000, as long as it's NTSC, it's going to record interlaced frames. Got one? Good. Now, mount it on a stable tripod, point it at a stationary object that has a sharp horizontal edge and record a few seconds of video; it doesn't matter how much, really, as all you need is 2 consecutive fields (1 frame). Now, get those 2 consecutive fields onto your computer, individually, however you can (a decent capture card and an S-Video connection will suffice) and overlay them onto one-another. Not the same, are they? One of them has that horizontal edge 1 pixel higher than the other, doesn't it? That one's your odd field, the one that's 1px lower is your even field. In fact, everything in that field is 1px higher than everything in the other field, and some fine details running along the horizontal axis appear in one frame, but not the other.

Your fields, being shot by a stationary camera aimed at a stationary subject, would be identical if interlaced video were, as you're simplifying it to be, simply half-height frames.

about two weeks ago
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California Man Sues Sony Because Killzone: Shadowfall Isn't Really 1080p

BronsCon Re:They deserve it (286 comments)

It's not actually double the temporal resolution, though -- you either get the odd half of the frame, then the even half of the same frame, at which point you've got one full frame every 29.97 seconds, or you get half-frames and experience interlace tearing during high-motion scenes. There's also telecine interlacing that shifts 24FPS content to 30FPS by adding an intermediary frame, even rows from the current frame, odd rows from the next, every 4 frames (that's 6 additional frames for every 24 frames of content, thus 30 frames); if you need 29.97FPS from that, you drop roughly 1 out of every 1000 frames (and you'd better stick to dropping full frames, and then only those that aren't adjacent to your interlaced frames, lest you introduce a noticeable artifact into the video every 33-1/3 seconds). There are a number of other encodings, as well, but they're not really relevant here.

Interlacing isn't actually a thing done by TV hardware when it receives that signal anyway.

Yes, actually... Well, not always, but on non-shit-tier sets, yes... But, I also think you meant de-interlacing.

It's entirely up to the TV to reconstruct the full frame, then, if necessary, scale the result to match the resolution of the display panel. If you don't do that and, rather, just scale each frame and display them as they come in, you get an image that appears to oscillate at your framerate (up on the even fields and down on the odd), which is really super-noticeable on static objects, like the bug most networks put in the bottom corner of the screen, or in still scenes.

It's been a good decade since I've worked with this stuff, but I still know a great deal of it.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Should John Seek Overtime Pay or Insist on Maintaining His Current Arrangement?

BronsCon BronsCon writes  |  about 9 months ago

BronsCon (927697) writes "A friend of mine recently came to me for advice regarding how to handle a situation with his employer. I advised him to contact an attorney, because any advice I could provide would likely be poor. But, his situation has made me curious; so I'd like to describe it here and pose the same question to the Slashdot community.

My friend, we'll call him John, has been working for a California-based company for several years in a position covered by IWC Article 4 (PDF warning, sorry) under the assumption that he was exempt from sections 3-12 (which includes the section relating to overtime pay); he recently decided to read over the law, as well as the exemption that could possibly apply to him, the Professional Exemption and the Employee in the Computer Software Field exemption, and discovered that given the current terms of his employment, he is in fact not exempt from any provision of Article 4. He also believes that his employer sincerely mistook his position as exempt and does not wish to punish them for what he believes to be an honest mistake.

For the duration of his employ, John has more or less been allowed to come and go as he pleases and has received frequent commendation for the level of work he puts out, so it would appear that his loose schedule has been beneficial for all involved, up to now. What prompted him to review the IWC documents was a sudden insistence from his boss that he was not working reasonable hours because "every other salaried position requires 50-60hr workweeks".

Here's the rub; he does not want to pursue the unpaid overtime, because this would bankrupt the company and put him out of a job, and he is worried that suing his employer may well make him unemployable. He simply either wants things to continue on as they have been, foregoing overtime pay in exchange for a high degree of freedom in his working schedule (which typically equates to coming in between 8:00 and 8:20 rather than at 8:00 sharp, taking 20-30min breaks rather than 10min, taking an occasional long lunch, and typically staying 30-90min later than most of his coworkers to make up for all of it, as well as working weekends to get things done that didn't get done during the week), or adjusting the working relationship into full compliance with IWC Article 4.

John's development work is largely done solo, he is always present for meetings, which are not held regularly, and his work is frequently completed ahead of schedule and under budget. There are no team members twiddling their thumbs while John is out getting coffee or walking off a heavy lunch before returning to the office.

I'm curious to see how Slashdot's advice will align with John's lawyer's advice, as well as what John will actually do in his situation. So, Slashdot, what would you do?"
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55.000+ Twitter usernames and passwords leaked

BronsCon BronsCon writes  |  more than 2 years ago

BronsCon writes "Today anonymous hackers leaked more than 55.000 hacked twitter accounts username and password through Pastebin. It was very shocking to see such a massive number of Twitter accounts are hacked. Also celebrity accounts are hacked. Links to all 5 pastebin pages of credentials are included in the article, so you can search for yours."
Link to Original Source
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Steve Jobs Dead at 55

BronsCon BronsCon writes  |  more than 2 years ago

BronsCon writes "Jobs, 55, has been instrumental in turning Apple into the dominant producer of portable music players, a leader in the smart phone business and, with the iPad, the inventor of a new category of modern tablet computers. Today, Apple announced that he has passed away, shortly after resigning as CEO of the company and the day following the announcment of the iPhone 4s"
Link to Original Source
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One Free Website For Every City

BronsCon BronsCon writes  |  more than 3 years ago

BronsCon writes "San Francisco Bay Area based web design/development firm Gutensite is giving away one Free Pro website to one person or organization in every city, world-wide. By creating a regular Free Lite site with the promo code "MYCITY" you will be eligible to win the prize, a free upgrade to the Webmaster package for one year, a $420 value.

The first sites have a higher chance of winning (see rules for details). But even if you don't win the Grand Prize, everyone will still get to keep their free site, or get 25% off the first full 3 months if they eventually decide to upgrade to a Pro site."

Link to Original Source
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BronsCon BronsCon writes  |  more than 7 years ago

BronsCon writes "Who/What is your favorite...


US President
Game Console
CPU
OS
Joke
Slashdot Editor


If you don't get the gag, please don't vote. Thank you."

Journals

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Talk about it

BronsCon BronsCon writes  |  about 6 years ago

Recently, I was flamed for making a "joke" of HIV (see below).

Said by an AC: I recommend a guerrilla trademark war: we simply need to decide what STD now gets the street name of "scrabble".

Said by me: HIV. It's about as active as scrabble and gets just about as much attention from the general populace. A ton of people have it but nobody really talks about it anymore.

Said by another AC: Why don't you grow a FUCKING brain cell. You are a fucking moron for taking something as serious as HIV and turning into the latest joke on slashdot. There are people who are FUCKING DYING because of HIV and I'm sure that none of them find you funny. I'm also sure you would stop laughing if you had an HIV test come back positive.

Said by me: Should I fax it to you, or is a simple scan and email enough?
I was actually going for insightful, rather than funny. A ton of people have HIV but nobody really talks about it. Just like Scrabble.
P.S. -- Who's the moron now?

-----

In all fairness, he's right, I don't have HIV. Dumb luck on his part.

Lord knows I've had some close calls; an ex fiancé who contracted it from a guy she cheated on me with and a girl I dated for a while who called me a few months after we broke up, insisting that I get tested. Dumb luck on my part.

Assigning the nickname 'Scrabble' to HIV might be the best thing to happen to it. If it gets people talking about it, if it raises awareness, beyond using it as an insult, it's a good thing.

If it raises awareness among corporations that, when they take something dear to us, we will take something dear to them in exchange ("Let's hang out with Kevin, he has Scrabble!" becomes "Don't sleep with Kevin, he has Scrabble!"), it is a good thing. But only if it's true.

I have a "FUCKING brain cell". In fact, I have many of them. Enough to realize that anything that gets people talking about an important issue is a good thing. Enough to realize that only a complete moron would flame someone for pointing out a problem such as people not talking about such an issue.

I stand proudly by the positions I take. I feel that, if something is not worth saying, it's not worth taking the time to say; if it is worth saying, it's worth taking credit for having said it.

Let it be known that I truly feel compassion for anyone who has Scrabble; the board game, or the illness.

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Our problem.

BronsCon BronsCon writes  |  about 6 years ago

I recently posted this in a discussion here on /. and decided it beneficial to all that I make it more accessible by placing it here, in my journal, as well.

-----

Here's the (general US population's) problem, as I see it.

Copyright was created to ensure that artists (I do consider coding to be an art-form) had an opportunity to earn income from their work before it could be freely copied or any derivatives could be made of it.

This led to fewer creative works being created in a given time frame than before, as most works are derivative of existing works. The best stories are those which expand on what we already know, right?

The government and pseudo-fascist corporations have begun to realize three things. First, that we, view copyright, in its current state, as a problem. Second, that they make a ton of money by exploiting the current state of the copyright system. Third, that by allowing us access to any creative means, they are allowing us the resources to overcome the current copyright system.

Thus, the ever-increasing system of restricting creativity, until it is illegal to express any thought contrary to their view of being paid for every peak and valley of every sound and light wave that we receive, which could have possibly originated from one of their exploited works.

Look through my post history. I don't typically post this kind of conspiracy-theorist drivel. I feel strongly enough about this issue in particular, however, that I will not sit idly and watch what little remaining freedom we have in this once great country be stolen from us, just as our once great wealth has been.

Now is the time to act. Not tomorrow. Not next week. Not next month. Not when Bush is replaced by the next pseudo-democratic-republican leader and you realize they're lying, too.

Now.

Before we lose the ability to create.

The terrorists don't have to fight anymore. We're doing it to ourselves.

We vote our freedom away by electing officials who have a proven track record of deception. We spend our freedom away by buying from companies who restrict how we can use our (or their, depending who you ask) products. We give our freedom away by continuing to do business with corporations who ship jobs and, with those jobs, our economic strength, to other countries, while many on our own soil can not find employment.

We routinely sell our freedom to the highest bidder and can do nothing but cry in disappointment when they never pay out.

Right now. This is the only time we have. Act.

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