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Amazon Takes On Microsoft, Google With WorkMail For Businesses

CBravo Re:Spam filtering, unlimited aliases, search, rule (63 comments)

Although I don't agree with you... Spamfiltering means you need data (from a large number of users). Not having free accounts means much less abuse data. Their service will not be as good.

3 days ago
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Engineers Develop 'Ultrarope' For World's Highest Elevator

CBravo Dyneema (247 comments)

There are examples of cable that are strong enough in long stretches (2.5km), light (~10kg) and have a high break strength. Such as used in a glider winch. I guess there are extra demands to an elevator.

4 days ago
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Silk Road Journal Found On Ulbricht's Laptop: "Everyone Knows Too Much"

CBravo Re:Mental note: (180 comments)

I almost read s/Norton/Snowden/ and then I read after the comma.

about two weeks ago
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Google and Apple Weaseling Out of "Do Not Track"

CBravo Re:TOR (145 comments)

Technically, maybe. Another route to change this is to have regulation prohibiting this (on a large scale like US or EU).

To aid in this, one has to make it more visible to the end user. Then maybe they will start requiring more strict rules.

about a month ago
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Google and Apple Weaseling Out of "Do Not Track"

CBravo Re:Not new (145 comments)

There could be a P2P-like-sharing of cookies from those sources. Got to watch out for special cases (login stuff or after viewing private content). You could swap out cookies after every page visit (given certain pages).

I am still wondering why my browser would care for cookies from those domains when being on a whole different site. Or limits their lifetimes better (sure google maps can set a cookie when visiting a website, but after closing the page it should be gone).

about a month ago
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Does Journal Peer Review Miss Best and Brightest?

CBravo Re:"Unconventional research" is fine (139 comments)

Scientists are not free to follow hunches if they are, in effect, not payed for. Hunches are a hobby in the NL. The effect is that mindnumb people do science here. I was good at hunches.

Your argument about reliability has a place. One should know how reliable it is. But your conclusion that non-proven stuff has no place in the scientific process is invalid imo. Because the scientific process is limited to journals.

Suppose our science is that 'we want to find a place to shop'. Some scientist went out some day and saw on the outskirts of a city, a shop. He now reports on that in a journal but it get rejected. Because he did not prove you could buy something there. For real people it would be silly. But for scientists with their peer reviewed journals it is fine; I would call this both scientific and requiring more research.

I will admit that it would not be easy to do, practically, with the scientific method (using journals) we are using today.

BTW There is another very good reason why creativity is not very high in science: Because it is not taught. The first 4 years of your education you only teach to reproduce (and get up to current knowledge). In that you follow what others have discovered in the past. But you are not taught how to discover the next book. Creativity is very different from learning standard stuff and can be taught (but it also needs time to get better).

about a month ago
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Does Journal Peer Review Miss Best and Brightest?

CBravo Re:"Unconventional research" is fine (139 comments)

I disagree.

Your opinion here, because you did not provide proof, should be taken with a few grains of salt. People do all sorts of things that are perfectly valid without proof. Science is not only the stuff that can be proven without a doubt (philosophy as an extreme). How would science ever have evolved without mediocre proof that were later confirmed with strong proof?

Now don't get me wrong. I like proof because it often gives insight and might reject other plausible explanations, etc. And there should be way to describe to what degree a paper is formally proven (i.e. what the risks are when you follow the reasoning in the paper).

But in the evolving state of a field of science, there are 'well-confined' areas that should use more proof and 'new' areas that are hardly explored. Don't confuse the two (both have value). The later does not have definitions yet, does not have methods of describing a method, ... Do not require writing a book for such new areas.

Your kind of opinion got me out of science. Creativity has no place there at this moment in time.

about a month ago
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Does Journal Peer Review Miss Best and Brightest?

CBravo Re:Statistical studies (139 comments)

Although simple, it would be very effective... Mod up please.

about a month ago
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"Lax" Crossdomain Policy Puts Yahoo Mail At Risk

CBravo Re:Again I ask... (50 comments)

Well new tech is also lagging. Do you have your own server with email, all services (like monitoring, backup, security, ...) and pretty good spam filtering? For not-so-much money?

about a month and a half ago
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"Lax" Crossdomain Policy Puts Yahoo Mail At Risk

CBravo Re:Again I ask... (50 comments)

Because larger amounts of people are slow to migrate.

about a month and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: Are Any Certifications Worth Going For?

CBravo Re:There is a reason for this! (317 comments)

We are a service provider and therefore create our own traffic and it is not extremely timing sensitive. We do monitor download times and they are always in acceptable limits (i.e. fast). The ports of our data centres are also monitored and spew out exactly our traffic numbers.

The load on our routers and the memory use is extremely low. They have been tested to see what happens under certain conditions. Vyatta takes a little memory per connection and we have seen a DDoS killing us because there was no more memory (when we had a low end machine do the work: Dell 1850, 2GB) and we upgraded the machine at that point to rediculous standards. But I will say that there certainly is a place for specialized equipment.

about 2 months ago
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French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

CBravo Re:Legal Opinion, Please? (699 comments)

Most countries do not have a DMCA. SOL.

about 2 months ago
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French Publishers Prepare Lawsuit Against Adblock Plus

CBravo Page neutrality (699 comments)

I think they are fighting for page neutrality. Why would one image not be loaded and the other one will be? Who is the author and holds the copyright? Who is the receiver to modify such works? I think they have a point (when net neutrality would be law; oh wait it isn't)[/evil grin]

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Paying For Linux Support vs. Rolling Your Own?

CBravo Re:Ask yourself: What is our business model? (118 comments)

The question should be: What are the risks and how do we keep them in balance (by maintaining control).

about 2 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Paying For Linux Support vs. Rolling Your Own?

CBravo Re:In my experience (118 comments)

That should teach you to not buy HP (or Dell) anymore. Buy normal motherboards that are not created by companies with non-standard ideas on creating hardware.

We no longer buy brand computers but have them assembled by our specs. We do not buy support, nor do we have SLAs. We do have enough people who understand and can solve operational issues (i.e. 5). We do tend to replace more stuff that fails to work when updated or has operational issues (like network cards that freeze when under full load, that is you Dell). And we have more hot-spare machines in a second location (good for maintenance, availability on HW failure, contingency plans, ...).

about 2 months ago

Submissions

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EU wants to aid evasion of censorship

CBravo CBravo writes  |  more than 6 years ago

CBravo (35450) writes "The Dutch site http://nu.nl/ wrote a story (in Dutch) about the Europarlement that wants to develop software to aid censorship evasion. 'It should punch a hole through the Chinese firewall' the parlement stated. They also want to give fines to companies that help sustain the censorship (like Cisco, Google and Yahoo).

Maybe the people in Australia need this to avoid their upcoming censorship."

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