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More Water Out There — Ice Found On an Asteroid

CNETNate Not human-sustaining (123 comments)

Although it's an important discovery, the real importance lies on finding water on objects that we may one day need to live on. We're never going to set up facilities on an asteroid. But on a moon we certainly could, and finding water ice there would be significantly more revelatory.

more than 4 years ago
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Zune HD Unveiled, Set For Fall Release

CNETNate Re:It's coming to Europe (410 comments)

Can you use the Zune Marketplace for that as well? Part of the European rollout will be integration with Xbox Live and the Zune Marketplace.

more than 5 years ago
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Zune HD Unveiled, Set For Fall Release

CNETNate It's coming to Europe (410 comments)

Zunes are also finally coming to Europe as well, which marks the first time Microsoft has announced the US exclusivity on the Zune is being dropped. Understandably, the US press has perhaps overlooked this fact, but if you live here in Europe, it's possibly bigger news than the Zune HD being announced.

more than 5 years ago
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iPhone 3.0 Software Announced

CNETNate Still no Adobe Flash (619 comments)

I'll use copy-paste once or twice a week, but I'd use Adobe Flash 99% of ever hour spent using Safari.

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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Last.fm: The hardware powering the music

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "Last.fm has streamed an incredible 275,000 years of audio around the world, and it's most popular songs are packed onto SSD-powered servers to completely eliminate some of the problems associated with streaming from platter-based hard disks. This detailed interview with Last.fm's Matthew Ogle, the company's head of Web development, explains some of the facts and figures behind the global music service. From the article: "We stream all music directly off our servers in London. We have a cluster of streaming nodes including a bunch of powerful machines with solid-state hard drives. We have a process that runs daily which finds the hottest music and pushes those tracks on to the SSDs streamers that sit in front of our regular platter-based streaming machines. That way, if someone is listening to one of our more popular stations, the chances are really good that these songs are coming off our high-speed SSD machines. They're fast because every song is sitting in memory instead of being on a slow, spinning platter.""
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Modern Tech versus The Past

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "Most of us assume modern life is the peak of human achievement, but is it really? We decided to take a look at the major technologies of the modern world and compare them to their closest equivalent of pre-digital mankind — Facebook vs dinner parties, World of Warcraft vs actual war craft, iPhones vs hills on fire — and the results are surprising. And slightly dumb, so laugh."
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Google demos Chrome OS, promises late 2010 release

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "Netbooks running Google's own operating system — Chrome OS — rather than Windows, yesterday took a giant step forward as the company released the underlying source code to the developer community. At a conference in the US, Sundar Pichai, Google's vice president of product management, announced the lightweight operating system is about a year away from release. He also promised it would ship pre-installed on Chrome OS-optimised netbooks, rather than be provided as a free download for anyone to install on any computer. In related news, Engadget has got the OS running inside VMWare and gives an early look at how it functions."
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Camino 2 browser benchmarked, compared, loved

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "Camino just hit its gold 2.0 milestone, bringing with it a pile of new features to make it an even more compelling OS X-only alternative to Safari, Firefox and Opera on the Mac. Benchmarks suggest it's not as quick as Firefox 3.5 or Safari 4 (or Chromium for Mac if you look at a different article), but it's faster than Opera, and less processor-demanding than Mozilla's own alternative. The pressure on the Camino team is increasing though, with the first official beta of Chrome for Mac potentially just days away. You can download Camino 2 here, or have a poke around some other alternative browsers for OS X, Linux and Windows beforehand."
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Study shows "60% of Xbox 360s have broken"

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "A new survey suggests as many as 60% of Xbox 360s have failed in RROD disasters, compared to 16% of PS3s and just 6% of Wiis. CNET commissioned the survey last month — and the results don't reflect well on the Microsoft console. Some 1,128 UK-based console owners responded, of whom 562 owned Xbox 360s, 473 owned PS3s and 591 had Wiis (some owned more than one). Of those Xbox owners who have bought their Xbox since January 2008, 34% report that they have broken — still double the lifetime failure rate of the PS3. Only 25% of disappointed 360 owners had owned the console for more than 18 months before it broke, with 47% reporting a failure inside a year."
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The 8 most brainless tech rumours in history

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "At the turn of the 20th century, Royal Society physicist Lord Kelvin made the remarkable statement that he believed the discovery of X-rays to be "a hoax". The rumoured fallacy of the X-ray discovery obviously went nowhere. But it's one of eight enormous technology rumours to have plagued the minds of the confused over the last century (though admittedly X-rays are more science than tech) . But X-rays being a hoax probably isn't quite as demented as what some people still believe: that Bill Gates is, in all seriousness, the antichrist."
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Alternative mobile browsers tested: Opera vs y'all

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "Do Opera Mobile, Skyfire or Mozilla's Fennec have the power to take down the BlackBerry browser, IE on Windows Mobile or Safari on the iPhone? This lengthy test aimed to find out. Speed, Acid3 compliance, Javascript rendering capabilities and general subjective usability were all tested and reviewed. So was Opera Mini and the default Symbian browser actually, but these two were unable to complete some of the tests and benchmarks."
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The Zoo versus the Internet

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "If you thought the Internet was fast, think again. The world's top animals were pitted against an average ADSL broadband upstream connection over a one-mile course, transferring 32GB of data. If you put 32GB of data on a bite-proof USB key and strapped it to a cheetah, for example, it would be available to read at the destination 11 times faster than the Internet. The cheetah takes 30.9 minutes, the Internet... over 6 hours. The article is reminiscent of the story from a few months ago, in which an Australian pigeon was faster at transporting data than a local compay's Internet connection."
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BBC: 'reducing bit rate has no impact on picture'

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "Erm. No. The BBC recently reduced the bit rate of BBC HD, leading to outraged complaints about the picture quality. The BBC has admitted that it has reduced the bit rate, but it also claims that its new, more efficient encoders make up the difference with increased efficiency. But in an interview, Danielle Nagler, the head of BBC HD, said that there's "no evidence that reducing the bit rate has had an impact on picture quality". Which strikes us as absurd."
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The sorry state of eBook readers today

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "No ebook reader is worth buying yet. It's as simple as that. No ebook store is adequately equipped to fulfil your needs, and no one product has matured to the point at which it can be unquestionably recommended. This article explores the trouble ebook readers are having, which lies not only in a lack of support from publishers and distributors, but the age-old difficulty of digital rights management and incompatible competing formats."
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HTC WinMo 6.5 phone scores higher than Pre, iPhone

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "HTC's new HD2 cell phone runs Windows Mobile 6.5, which is apparently such a drastic improvement it earned scores higher than the Palm Pre and the original iPhone in CNET's review. It's also the first Windows Mobile phone to use a capacitive touchscreen instead of a clumsy stylus (as seen on video). Is this the dawn of Windows Mobile being, y'know, not horrible?"
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The founders of boo.com: Where are they now?

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "Possibly the greatest example of dotcom failure, boo.com ten years ago attempted to become the planet's most technologically sophisticated online fashion store. It exhausted $185m of investment in just 18 months, because it relied on the home broadband connections that didn't exist, and depended on a trust in online retail people didn't yet have. A decade later, where are its two founders — former model Kajsa Leander and entrepreneur Ernst Malmsten? It turns out they're both living very differently to how they were in 1999."
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Why won't they die? The tech we won't forget

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "Fax machines, for one, refuse to be replaced entirely. As do landline telephones. But why? Why are so many technologies which have been succeeded and bettered over time, still in use? This article details 8 pieces of technology which, for one reason or another, have defied the downfall time should've provided, and are still commonly used today. There are probably 80 others not listed, of course."
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What does Google Suggest suggest about humanity?

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "You'll laugh, but mostly you'll cry. Some of the questions Google gets asked to deliver results for is beyond worrying. 'Can you put peroxide in your ear?', 'Why would a pregnancy test be negative?', and 'Why can't I own a Canadian?' being just a selection of the truly baffling — and disturbing — questions Google is regularly forced to answer."
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Plug vs Plug: Which nation's plug socket is best?

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "Is the American mains socket really so much worse than the Italian design? And does the Italian socket fail at rivaling the sockets in British homes? This feature explores, in a not-at-all-parodic-and-anecdotal fashion, the designs, strengths and weaknesses of Earth's mains adapters. There is only one conclusion, and you're likely not to agree if you live in France. Or Italy. Or in fact most places."
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Interview: Behind the scenes of Zero Punctuation

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "Zero Punctuation is one of the most popular videogames shows on the Web. It's creator — Ben "Yahtzee" Croshaw — holds little restraint in insulting the most atrocious titles, evident in such lines as "Ninja Gaiden 2 is part of a dying breed, so I'm inclined to be nice towards it as I would towards anyone else with a terminal illness." In a rare interview talked to CNET to explain how he makes the show, his views on censorship, and the doors the show's popularity has opened for him — a full novel entitled Mogworld scheduled to be released next year."
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The tech aboard the International Space Station

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "With its own file server for uploaded Hollywood blockbusters, a 10Mbps Internet connection to Earth and a stock of IBM ThinkPad notebooks for sending emails, the amount of consumer technology aboard the $150 billion International Space Station is impressive. Yet it's the responsibility of just two guys to maintain the uptime of the Space Station's IT, and they have given an in-depth interview with CNET to explain what tech's aboard, how it works and whether Windows viruses are a threat to the astronauts. In a related feature, the Space Station's internal network (which operates over just bandwidth of just1Mbps) and its connected array of Lenovo notebooks is explained, along with the future tech we could see aboard the traveling colony as it traverses the future."
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OS X Snow Leopard "annoying" competitor to Windows

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "One editor at CNET believes OS X Snow Leopard is fundamentally inferior to Microsoft's Windows 7 on practically every level. "Apple could have pounded a dagger through the heart of Windows with real innovation, but its decision to rest on its laurels somewhat, incrementally tweaking rather than modernizing," he said, "casts a shadow of doubt over its latest operating system." In terms of customization, compatibility, ease of use, office-compliance, and many other points of interest, Windows dominates OS X even today. Personally, I think he's incorrect on almost every level, though I wouldn't go as far as having him lynched as one commenter suggested."
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Microsoft launches Windows 7 worldwide

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "Today, worldwide, Microsoft's follow-up to Windows Vista — Windows 7 — has gone on sale after two years of remarkably problem-free development. In the process, it has dealt with the EU's heavy-handed criticism of Internet Explorer's bundling, and heavy criticism of the sheer number of versions on sale in different territories. But following enormous volumes of beta tester feedback, the reviews have been favourable almost across the board. Ars Technica also has an interesting interview today with some of the developers being Win7, who explain how crucial user feedback was in the development process."
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Windows 7 released early in UK

CNETNate CNETNate writes  |  more than 4 years ago

CNETNate (1469133) writes "UK customers have been reporting that they received their copies of Windows 7 in the mail today. Currently the British postal service is threatening industrial action over pay, and planned walkouts may result in Windows 7 not being delivered on its release date. It is understood that Microsoft has agreed to let some retailers send out copies early to avoid disappointment, and to make the UK the first country in the world to have Windows 7 in customers' hands."
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