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Comments

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Selectable Ethics For Robotic Cars and the Possibility of a Robot Car Bomb

CanHasDIY Re:Will not matter. (235 comments)

Those mistakes will lead to lawsuits. You were injured when a vehicle manufactured by "Artificially Intelligent Motors, inc (AIM, inc)" hit you by "choice". That "choice" was programmed into that vehicle at the demand of "AIM, inc" management.

So no. No company would take that risk. And anyone stupid enough to try would not write perfect code and would be sued out of existence after their first patch.

Considering how bloody obvious that outcome seems to be, it amazes me how some educated people just flat out don't get it.

Or rather, it would amaze me, if I weren't fully aware of the human mind's ability to perform complex mental gymnastics in order to come to a predetermined conclusion, level of education notwithstanding.

yesterday
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Selectable Ethics For Robotic Cars and the Possibility of a Robot Car Bomb

CanHasDIY Re:Insurance rates (235 comments)

Because it wouldn't be a liability to anyone anymore. Imagine zero crashes. That's an extreme, but let's assume that for the sake of argument.

Sure, and next we can talk about economics assuming that there really is such a thing as a free market.

Or, let's not, since "most unlikely circumstance possible" is a really shitty basis for the sake of any argument.

yesterday
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Selectable Ethics For Robotic Cars and the Possibility of a Robot Car Bomb

CanHasDIY Re:MUCH easier. (235 comments)

And that is why autonomous cars will NEVER be programmed with a "choice" to hit person X in order to avoid hitting person A.

I completely, totally, utterly, and vehemently disagree with you on that.

Given a choice, I think autonomous cars at some point WILL be programmed with such a choice. For example, hitting an elderly person in order to avoid hitting a small child.

Which creates liability for the company that wrote the code, because it can and will be construed that the car was designed to intentionally harm someone, and it doesn't matter that it was intentionally avoiding someone else.

Which is why I agree with OP that such a system is never going to be implemented. Not by anyone who doesn't want to be sued into oblivion.

yesterday
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Selectable Ethics For Robotic Cars and the Possibility of a Robot Car Bomb

CanHasDIY Re:Insurance rates (235 comments)

Send my best wishes then to the middlemen who WON'T exist when Tesla Motors and companies like them eventually sell direct.

Equally, send my regards to Carnac the Magnificent, since you seem capable of channeling him.

yesterday
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Selectable Ethics For Robotic Cars and the Possibility of a Robot Car Bomb

CanHasDIY Re:Insurance rates (235 comments)

Do unicorns and flying pigs exist in that fantasy world, too?

I'm so sorry that there will be hardly any accidents, and so the number of claims will nose-dive. It's tragic, but you can't stop progress.

So... yes, then.

yesterday
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Selectable Ethics For Robotic Cars and the Possibility of a Robot Car Bomb

CanHasDIY Re:Insurance rates (235 comments)

Car insurance companies will die off when car AI becomes mainstream.

Kind of like how representative democracy died off when we all got smart phones, right?

No, dude, sadly middlemen will always exist, adding no value to things but taking your money anyway.

yesterday
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Humans Need Not Apply: a Video About the Robot Revolution and Jobs

CanHasDIY Re:The problem with the all robotic workforce idea (303 comments)

As a student of history, I lack that faith in the ability of the human species to, at any point, stop being selfish douchebags. But I do, occasionally, hope that I'm mistaken.

yesterday
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Humans Need Not Apply: a Video About the Robot Revolution and Jobs

CanHasDIY Re:The problem with the all robotic workforce idea (303 comments)

I've always maintained that the extinction of the human race would be the best thing that could possibly happen to the environment.

That's a much more workable concept than fundamentally changing the way humans have behaved since probably before we became humans.

yesterday
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Ask Slashdot: Would You Pay For Websites Without Trolls?

CanHasDIY Trolls == Necessary Evil (374 comments)

Unless you want to live in an echo chamber, trolls are just something you have to learn to deal with. Besides, there's no such thing as an "anti-dickhead premium," because no matter what, if you're having a discussion with any significant group of people, it's pretty much guaranteed one of them is going to have a different enough opinion that you're going to want to stick that "troll" label on them.

2 days ago
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Humans Need Not Apply: a Video About the Robot Revolution and Jobs

CanHasDIY Re:The problem with the all robotic workforce idea (303 comments)

Replace ???? with zero all debts. Done.

In fact we should do that now anyway.

Sure. We also should, instead of paying farmers to throw away crops, have those crops shared with people who don't have enough food. But we don't.

Hence the reason I don't buy into the 'all-robot-workforce-utopia' nonsense - it won't work for the same reason communism won't work, that is the fact that there's always someone who will gleefully step on every throat they find to get an advantage over other people.

2 days ago
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Swedish Dad Takes Gamer Kids To Warzone

CanHasDIY Re:Differences (417 comments)

Typical American - "You're not raising your children the way I think children should be raised, so you're wrong!"

At least, it sure as hell seems that way.

That is a human problem, not an American problem. Everybody on this planet is sure their way of life is the correct way. That is why everybody laughs at the fat, dumb, lazy, violent, American kids. Because they have different priorities.

Well, then that's comforting... or something....

2 days ago
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Is Storage Necessary For Renewable Energy?

CanHasDIY Re:Energy micro-auctions (430 comments)

No, he didn't say any of that, actually.

Oh, and FYI, if you want to be taken seriously, learn proper spelling and mechanics.

2 days ago
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Watch a Cat Video, Get Hacked: the Death of Clear-Text

CanHasDIY Tax Rebate (165 comments)

state actors involving "network injection appliances" installed at ISPs.

So, since we're being charged by the bit now, and the government is taking my bits (that we pay for) off the pipe and replacing them with their bits (that we also pay for)... wouldn't that imply that these "state actors" should be on the hook for at least part of our ISP usage bills?

4 days ago
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Swedish Dad Takes Gamer Kids To Warzone

CanHasDIY Re:Gettin All Up In Yo Biznis (417 comments)

External factors do influence of course, but I think it's overly simplistic to assume tweenage kids think cod = real war, where soldiers respawn after they're shot.

At that point, I just hope they understand the difference between right and wrong (and that you shouldn't do "wrong" things) more than anything.

4 days ago
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Swedish Dad Takes Gamer Kids To Warzone

CanHasDIY Re:Gettin All Up In Yo Biznis (417 comments)

Kids are way smarter than you think. Even my 6 yo sees an explosion on TV and tells me "But dad, this is fiction, but they really made that explosion right? Couldn't someone get hurt?".

And yet, when I took my 6 year old nephew hunting last year, I had to explain how death works when he asked, "But won't the deer just respawn?"

So, anecdote for anecdote, we just broke even.

FWIW, I'm guessing the difference is, you're at least a decent parent, whereas my in-laws are abject fucking morons whose idea of discipline equates to 'how loud can I scream at my kid.'

Of course, the apparently high number of 'abject fucking moron' parents seems to give some weight to my hypothesis.

4 days ago
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Humans Need Not Apply: a Video About the Robot Revolution and Jobs

CanHasDIY Re:How will the future... (303 comments)

Yea, like that, but with better geometry.

Because they're robots, you see...

4 days ago
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Humans Need Not Apply: a Video About the Robot Revolution and Jobs

CanHasDIY Re: The problem with the all robotic workforce ide (303 comments)

I used to work with a guy who switched from well-paid developer to home theater installer, and was making considerably more last I heard.

I know a guy in a similar circumstance - used to write software for banks, now he does ultra-high-end home automation installs in penthouse suites around the nation. If I could handle that much travel, I'd be in on it myself.

4 days ago
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Swedish Dad Takes Gamer Kids To Warzone

CanHasDIY Re:Gettin All Up In Yo Biznis (417 comments)

Some people think that, because they believe themselves to have a solid grip on reality, every single one of the other 6,999,999,999 humans on the planet also have an equally solid grip.

Of course, that belief in itself is an exercise in cognitive dissonance, but you can't tell those folks that, because, being delusional, they'll never believe you.

4 days ago
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Swedish Dad Takes Gamer Kids To Warzone

CanHasDIY Re:Gettin All Up In Yo Biznis (417 comments)

I don't mind shooting up some virtual people, I want to be as far away from real war as I possibly can be.

Yes, as an adult, you realize that. But would you have realized it as a child? Probably not, if the only experience you had with guns and death was video-game based.

I was a child in the 70s. We didn't have video games then, but we did have nasty brutish violent cartoons. We had concerned citizen groups whining "Think of the children!" right and left, but I don't remember anybody getting an anvil dropped on them because they saw it in a cartoon.

You also had people who believed if they worshiped a particular sky-fairy, it would grant them wishes. Like, believed to the point that they would outright slaughter people who disagreed with them. Does that not sound like a person who can't separate reality from fantasy?

FYI, we still have those people today, slaughter and all.

4 days ago
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Swedish Dad Takes Gamer Kids To Warzone

CanHasDIY Re:Gettin All Up In Yo Biznis (417 comments)

If you're not already signed up for the Olympics, get your name in there - you'd definitely medal in Mental Gymnastics.

Silver at least.

4 days ago

Submissions

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Man criticizes Southwest employee, booted from flight and threatened with arrest

CanHasDIY CanHasDIY writes  |  about a month ago

CanHasDIY (1672858) writes "The old saying goes, "if you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all." A man from Minnesota learned the consequences Sunday, after Tweeting about his experience with a rude Southwest gate attendant:

A Minnesota man and his two sons were asked to leave a Southwest Airlines flight after the man sent a tweet complaining about being treated rudely by a gate agent... he agent told him that he would have to wait if he wanted to board with his children. Watson replied that he had boarded early with them before and then sent out a tweet that read "RUDEST AGENT IN DENVER. KIMBERLY S. GATE C39. NOT HAPPY @SWA."

After he boarded, an announcement came over the plane asking his family to exit the aircraft. Once at the gate, the agent said that unless the tweet was deleted, police would be called and the family would not be allowed back onboard."

He gave into the threat, deleted the Tweet, and was allowed to board a later flight (with his sons). Southwest, as one could have predicted, offered a boilerplate "apology" and vouchers for more terrible service.

As of this post, no word on the rude agent's current employment status.

"

Link to Original Source
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Worst Idea Ever? Missouri DOT Considers Assaulting Speeders With 150dB Cannon

CanHasDIY CanHasDIY writes  |  about 4 months ago

CanHasDIY (1672858) writes "The Missouri DOT has come up with a... let's say 'novel' solution to the issue of drivers speeding through work zones: Fire a 153dB LRAD sound cannon at their windshield.

MoDOT employee Michele Compton claims the device will only be triggered by speeders (however they choose to define that term), and that "The sound easily penetrates the windshield and well-insulated cab of a car, even overriding the vehicle's engine sounds and a radio turned up loud enough to jam to tunes at highway speeds."

Several people have brought up valid questions about the system's use — will it be able to tell if it's pointed at a car or a motorcycle, and compensate appropriately, or just blast the poor biker off the road? Aside from the obvious physical danger such a weapon would cause if deployed on a busy highway, there's also a more Orwellian component to be concerned with: Tasers were originally issued to police officers as less-than-lethal "deterrent" devices, and the scope of their use has crept into "compliance" territory. How long before the government is using the military grade weaponry such as the LRAD not to punish lawbreakers, but to control the populace in general?

Oh, wait, that already happened."

Link to Original Source
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Retired SCOTUS Justice Wants to "Fix" the Second Amendment

CanHasDIY CanHasDIY writes  |  about 4 months ago

CanHasDIY (1672858) writes "In his yet-to-be-released book, Six Amendments: How and Why We Should Change the Constitution, John Paul Stevens, who served as an associate justice of the Supreme Court for 35 years, believes he has the key to stopping the seeming recent spate of mass killings — amend the Constitution to exclude private citizens from armament ownership. Specifically, he recommends adding 5 words to the 2nd Amendment, so that it would read as follows:

“A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms when serving in the Militia shall not be infringed.”

What I find interesting is how Stevens maintains that the Amendment only protects armament ownership for those actively serving in a state or federal military unit, in spite of the fact that the Amendment specifically names "the People" as a benefactor (just like the First, Fourth, Ninth, and Tenth) and of course, ignoring the traditional definition of the term militia. I'm personally curious as to what his other 5 suggested changes are, but I guess we'll have towait until the end of April to find out."

Link to Original Source
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GunGeoMarker App Finally Shows its True Colors (And They're Hideous)

CanHasDIY CanHasDIY writes  |  about a year ago

CanHasDIY (1672858) writes "The GunGeoMarker app for Android, which is probably the worst non-malware app ever thought up, updated in a way that completely changes the functionality of the program: instead of a garbage program that brings up a static map of your current location and only allows users to enter a single, 30-character-or-less post, the app now (via a button labeled, "What the Project Really Is: HONEYPOT" ) opens your web browser and directs you to the author's latest masturbatory blog post, in which Brett Stalbaum showers himself with praise for the success of the 'project,' as well as removing what little functionality existed in the first place.

  Apparently the whole point of this exercise was to give an excuse for Stalbaum to demonize those with differing opinions, as well as justify some self-inflicted back patting. Kudos, I guess?"
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MIT: One Step Closer to 3D Holography, Better Medical Imaging

CanHasDIY CanHasDIY writes  |  about a year and a half ago

CanHasDIY (1672858) writes "Remember that scene in Back To The Future: Part II, where Marty is 'attacked' by the holographic Jaws? Researchers at MIT's Research Laboratory of Electronics have gotten one step closer to such a technology: record-setting Optical Phase Arrays that can actively steer light, in the form of a 4,096-emitter array that fits on a single silicon chip. From TFA:

Chips that can steer beams of light could enable a wide range of applications, including cheaper, more efficient, and smaller laser rangefinders; medical-imaging devices that can be threaded through tiny blood vessels; and even holographic televisions that emit different information when seen from different viewing angles.

Neat."
Link to Original Source

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Valve Pulls a Sony, Eliminates Right to Sue in Newest Steam Subscriber Update

CanHasDIY CanHasDIY writes  |  about 2 years ago

CanHasDIY (1672858) writes "Per an article on PCGamer:

Valve has made some major changes to the Steam Subscriber Agreement, changing the way it handles customer disputes and banning any class action lawsuits over the service. In both cases, it informs us, this is for everyone’s own good – ours as customers, and Valve’s as a company.

The specific paragraph from [Valve's] blog post goes like this:

“It’s clear to us that in some situations, class actions have real benefits to customers. In far too many cases however, class actions don’t provide any real benefit to users and instead impose unnecessary expense and delay, and are often designed to benefit the class action lawyers who craft and litigate these claims. Class actions like these do not benefit us or our communities. We think this new dispute resolution process is faster and better for you and Valve while avoiding unnecessary costs, and that it will therefore benefit the community as a whole.”

Considering the decidedly less-than-noble motivations of others whose practices Valve is emulating (I'm looking at you, Sony... you too, EA), this submitter finds that statement dubious at best, as well as wondering what recourse, if any, current Steam subscribers will have to avoid being forced to either agree to get screwed, or lose access to our games."
Link to Original Source

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Verizon Wireless Goes Ahead With "Bucket" Data Plans

CanHasDIY CanHasDIY writes  |  more than 2 years ago

CanHasDIY (1672858) writes "Previously, it was reported that Verizon was considering eliminating their current data plan scheme, as well as the grandfathered unlimited plans, in favor of a new 'bucket' plan in which up to 10 devices would share a data allotment. Verizon officially acknowledged it today, called the "Share Everything" plan, which will go into effect as of June 28, 2012;
according to USA Today:

Under the new pricing plan, a smartphone customer opting for the cheapest data bucket, 1 gigabyte, will pay $90 before taxes and fees ($40 for phone access and $50 for 1 GB). Customers can add a basic phone, laptop and tablet to share data for $30, $20 and $10, respectively.

Those of us still grandfathered into the unlimted plan will be forced to either sign up for Share Everything, or one of the tiered pricing plans currently in effect."
Link to Original Source

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New Samsung TV Watches You Watching It

CanHasDIY CanHasDIY writes  |  more than 2 years ago

CanHasDIY (1672858) writes "Straight out of 1984, Samsung has unveiled a new series of telescreens with integrated cameras and microphones, complete with facial and voice recognition software. Best of all, there appears to be no physical indication of the mic and camera's status, so consumers have no way of knowing when they're being monitored, or by whom... and if you don't find the idea of a TV that watches you creepy enough, apparently Samsung's Terms of Service include a clause allowing third-party apps to make use of the monitoring system, and use the data gathered for their own purposes.

Nothing Orwellian about that..."

Link to Original Source
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Nokia Applies for Vibrating Tattoo Patent

CanHasDIY CanHasDIY writes  |  about 2 years ago

CanHasDIY (1672858) writes "Tired of waiting for the Pip-Boy or Omni-Tool to be invented? Never fear! Nokia is developing the basic technology needed to make your dreams a reality: haptic-feedback tattoos. According to the patent application, Nokia is proposing “a material attachable to skin, the material capable of detecting a magnetic field and transferring a perceivable stimulus to the skin, wherein the perceivable stimulus relates to the magnetic field.”

Basically, the process is the same as for normal tattooing; the difference is in the ferromagnetic ink.

Kind of brings new meaning to the term "embedded device," doesn't it?"

Link to Original Source
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U.S. Congress Quietly Criminalizes Protesting

CanHasDIY CanHasDIY writes  |  about 2 years ago

CanHasDIY (1672858) writes "From Huffington Post:

H. R. 347, better known to those in the DC beltway as the 'Trespass Bill' — potentially makes peaceable protest anywhere in the U.S. a federal felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison. H. R. 347, and it's companion senate bill S. 1794, make protest of any type potentially a federal offense with anywhere from a year to 10 years in federal prison, providing it occurs in the presence of elites brandishing Secret Service protection, or during an officially defined 'National Special Security Event' (NSSE). NSSEs , ( an invention of Bill Clinton) are events which have been deemed worthy of Secret Service protection, which previously received no such treatment... Past NSSE events included the funerals of Gerald Ford and Ronald Reagan, and the national security concern that was Superbowl XXXVI. Other NSSE protected events include the Academy Awards and the 2008 Democratic and Republican National Conventions... HR 347 & S. 1794 insulates such events as the G-8, WTO and presidential conventions against tough questions and politically justified protests.

"

Link to Original Source
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New Android App Combines Business, Pleasure

CanHasDIY CanHasDIY writes  |  more than 2 years ago

CanHasDIY (1672858) writes "According to PCWorld, German IT firm Fraunhofer have developed a system of dividing a single Android smartphone into two; one for personal use, and one for business. The technology, known as BizzTrust, will be displayed at the IT-SA trade show running at the Nuremberg Exhibition Centre until October 13; a generic explanation of the software is available in PDF format here."
Link to Original Source

Journals

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Obama and Romney respond to ScienceDebate.org questions - paraphrased

CanHasDIY CanHasDIY writes  |  about 2 years ago

Converting candidate responses from legalese to English, please wait...*

Question 1: Innovation and the Economy:

BO: I plan on dumping at least twice as much money into corporate pocketbooks via the continued fucking-up of the US intellectual property process. Oh, yea, and I plan on hiring a shitload of STEM teachers to prep future patent lawyers, er, "engineers" for this task.

MR: Less taxes and regulation for businesses, more H1B Visas and foreign "trade agreements" that take jobs away from Americans.

Question 2, Climate Change:

BO: Sure, it's a problem, but I've already dumped a shit-ton of your money into the "clean energy" companies my buddies own, as well as attempting to set up a "carbon credit exchange" scam, er, system, that would have funneled even more taxpayer dollars into the hands of my campaign contributors - what the fuck else do you expect me to do about it?

MR: Probably bullshit, but I won't let my disbelief in the concept prevent me from using this as an opportunity to badmouth my opponent and recommend further redistribution of wealth to my also-rich homies!

Furthermore, since China doesn't give a fuck about the environment, I don't think we should either.

Question 3: Research and the Future:

BO: Uh, like I said before - more of the public's money given to corporations so they can privately profit; seriously, what don't you guys get about that?

MR: Agreed, with the caveat of, you guessed it, less regulation for the same corporations. After all, corporations are people, and if you can't trust people with your money...

Question 4: Pandemics and Biosecurity:

BO: ... Pass.

MR: Less taxes and regulation on business... Oh, and more public surveillance. How are we supposed to know who's sick if we're not watching you all 24/7?

Question 5: Education:

BO: Earlier in my administration, I proposed adding 100,000 STEM (science, tech, engineering, and math) teachers... just don't ask how that's going...

MR: Education is a serious issue these days... which is why I recommend busting teachers' unions, defunding public schools in favor of private "charter" schools, and of course, blaming the current abysmal state of education solely on my opponent.

Question 6: Energy:

BO: Hey, I mentioned giving fuck-tons of taxpayer money to my buddies who run "clean energy" companies, right?

MR: I disagree with my opponent; I think we should be giving fuck-tons of taxpayer money to the oil companies my buddies run instead.
Can I getta 'Keystone Pipeline,' anyone?

Question 7: Food:

BO: Food safety was pretty fucked up when I came to office, so I made new rules that changes what qualifies as 'fucked up.'

MR: More government regulation and taxes. Hey, if those agri-business chumps want the same deal I give the oil and pharmaceutical companies, they need to pony up some campaign bucks, ya dig?

Question 8: Water:

BO: My administration has invested millions in fresh water conservation and restoration efforts. Granted, these programs would have existed anyway regardless of who held this office at the time, but hey - I do, so I get to take the credit. Suck it, Bush.

MR: Disband the EPA, less regulation on businesses, privatize the 'fresh water industry'.
What could possibly go wrong?

Question 9: The Internet:

BO: I promise to ensure online freedoms, granted they don't run afoul of all the new intellectual property and civilian surveillance we have/are coming up with.

Ha ha, remember when I told you I was going to veto CISPA? Suckers...

MR: The internet is for businesses to make money off of. Period. End of discussion. If you're somehow, some way preventing businesses from making as much money as possible from the internet, my administration will come down on you like fucking Mjölnir, you filthy fucking anti-capitalist pirates.

Question 10: The Ocean

BO: Funneling money into the Gulf to try and fix the problems caused by the Deepwater Horizon disaster. Also, I'll again take credit for several state-level programs I had nothing to do with.

MR: Government should handle this, never you mind. Seriously, we got this one, and unless you work for the government or the industrial fishery complex, it's really none of your concern. Now fuck off, peasant.

Question 11: Science in Public Policy:

BO: Science is, like, important, so I try to have my decisions guided by science. The decisions I let the media get wind of, anyway. Probably not a whole lot of science to, say, monitoring the communications of every American, so we just do it.

MR: Stupid nigger doesn't even know what 'science' is... If he did, he'd know the Earth is only about 6,000 years old, man rode dinosaurs, and Darwin was a Marxist.

Question 12: Space:

BO: Dude - Under my leadership, NASA put a fucking SUV equipped with some serious instrumentation on MARS. More in the works, stay tuned!

MR: Hey, so long as the military industrial complex and my campaign-funding buddies can make shitloads of money off of it, why not?

Question 13: Critical Natural Resources:

BO: Rare earth minerals are expensive, and the Chinese don't seem to keen on cutting us any deals, so my administration is looking into alternative materials that can be gathered domestically. We're also working on some electronics recycling programs that show real promise - stay tuned, more to come.

MR: Government regulation is the problem, not material scarcity; deregulate the mining companies, and the rare earth minerals will flow from the ground like water from a busted hydrant. Oh, also - Drill, baby, Drill!

Question 14: Vaccination and public health:

BO: Look, a lot of people don't get the proper vaccinations because they're just too damn expensive. So, I (and by I, I mean Congress) passed the Affordable Care Act, which... uh, which... OK, so it doesn't really do anything to get prices down, and in fact will likely increase the price of healthcare due to the compulsory insurance purchasing requirement... can't win 'em all! :3

MR: Less regulation for the pharmaceutical industry, and forced inoculation for the entire populace. Small government, you know?

--- END TRANSCRIPT ---

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Setting up a Gmail account -- funny things

CanHasDIY CanHasDIY writes  |  more than 2 years ago So, I'm making a Gmail account for my in-law's business, and I'm to the part where you have to create a password. Just for a giggle, I entered 'fuckgoogle' into the box - here's where it gets funny:

Password - as soon as I got to the 'l' in the password, the strength meter jumped all the way to the top, but when I entered the final letter, it jumped right back down to the weakest.

Date of Birth - will only let you create an account if the DoB is between 1 and 150 years ago.

OK, so not that funny.

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