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Comments

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In a Hole, Golf Courses Experiment With 15-inch Holes

Charliemopps um... (83 comments)

A 15-inch-hole event was held at the Reynolds Plantation resort last week...

How about instead of screwing around with the size of the holes, you just stop naming your golf courses after something that's basically synonymous with the 200yr holocaust that was slavery? It doesn't help that if you're not white you have to call the course up ahead of time to make sure they'll let you in.

about an hour ago
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Why Portland Should Have Kept Its Water, Urine and All

Charliemopps Lol (217 comments)

Lol... they're closing the resivour next year anyway:

"Those natural contaminants are a key part of the Environmental Protection Agency's justification for a rule that requires all open-air reservoirs to be covered. Portland is scheduled to disconnect the open-air reservoirs on Mt. Tabor from the drinking water system by the end of 2015.

Shaff said there isn't much the bureau can do about those natural contaminants in the meantime, and that they don't pose a serious health risk."

http://www.oregonlive.com/port...

So this is actually twice as stupid as it sounds.

12 hours ago
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Why Portland Should Have Kept Its Water, Urine and All

Charliemopps Re:36 million gallons? (217 comments)

Definitely. The first floor of the building I work in is 10,000. The government never builds anything that small.

12 hours ago
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Biofuels From Corn Can Create More Greenhouse Gases Than Gasoline

Charliemopps Re:Uh ... it's still carbon neutral, isn't it? (94 comments)

It's taking a lot of the carbon from the soil instead of the air... so no. Also, consider all the gasoline used to plant/harvest/transport it. Ethanol is a corn-state boondoggle. It drives up corn prices and brings in massive revenue to the midwest. Ethanol support is critical for any politician that wants to win in states like Iowa. When you hear a 60yr old farmer start talking about "green energy" you know he grows corn.

12 hours ago
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L.A. Science Teacher Suspended Over Student Science Fair Projects

Charliemopps Re:Its the anti-gun agenda, seriously, read articl (178 comments)

No, it's not necessarily an anti-gun agenda... But what's going on is Doctors have come to the conclusion that children are safest if you do not have a gun in the house at all and if the children have no concept of how a gun works, so theoretically the kid will have no idea how to use or fire a real one if the find it and maybe they'd be terrified of it because of its unfamiliarity. Unfortunately, in practice, this idea is flawed. Of course kids know how to shoot a gun. The action is designed to work on instinct so you don't forget how to use the weapon at the critical moment you need it. So if kids do find a gun, of course they can figure it out, and now that they have no firearm safety training... so... Yea, it's a stupid policy created by people that don't own guns. If they simply had the local hunters safety instructor come in and give about 5hrs of instruction per year it would go a lot further.

12 hours ago
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Ask Slashdot: Hungry Students, How Common?

Charliemopps Personal Experience (361 comments)

Well, it's anecdotal, but when I was in college my parents paid for one of those meal cards... so I could go to any of the college dining halls I wanted to and I couldn't blow the money on beer (I definitely would have!) This worked great when I was in the dorms. I was always skinny and actually started to gain some weight. But after I started having to pay the dorm fees, they were REALLY expensive compared to basically anything off campus that was easily quadruple the size of a dorm room. So I moved to an apartment. Now the dining halls were 3 miles away. So I basically always didn't get breakfast, but I'd get lunch... and I'd get dinner maybe, depending on my schedule. During the summer I had no reason to go on campus other than to eat. So I'd hide what I could in my coat and smuggle it out to re-heat later.

I was never going to "starve" as, if I really needed it I'd walk the 3miles, but it was still a major distraction.

yesterday
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3 Former Astronauts: Earth-Asteroid Collisions Are a Real But Preventable Danger

Charliemopps Re:I am all for this research (62 comments)

However.... what happens when there is an Asteroid that will threaten earth... in between the time the telescope is developed,
but before the asteroid diversion tech is developed?

We already have the tech to deflect an asteroid (depending on its size) Building the device however, wold require a huge investment. I suspect that once we detected an asteroid on a course that would collide with earth, it would be pretty easy for the US or Russia to just declare a state of emergency and build what was needed in a few months. Perhaps by then India and China will have space programs robust enough to assist as well.

yesterday
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Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon

Charliemopps Re:Bullshit (375 comments)

Because the brewers will just dump it. They'll lose $30/ton + about $15 per ton to dump it at the local landfill unless they find another buyer. 1 ton of grain probably makes over a thousand gallons of beer. So $45/1000 = .0045 or 5 cents per gallon of beer. This is not even taking into account that the landfills probably closer and they don't find another buyer.

2 days ago
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Microsoft Plans $1 Billion Server Farm In Iowa

Charliemopps Re:Saves about $38 million in taxes (84 comments)

All states do this. To attract big projects each state offers lower taxes for a period of time, free or discounted utilities, temporary changes to regulation etc... Whomever makes the best offer gets the facility. The state will collect far more than $38 million from the people that work there's income taxes alone. Not that the state/city can't make mistakes if they're stupid... but this deal isn't bad for the state at all.

2 days ago
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Bug Bounties Don't Help If Bugs Never Run Out

Charliemopps Re:Bennett's Ego (234 comments)

While I don't share the AC's animosity towards you, the premise of your argument is entirely wrong.

The number of bugs are not limitless, they are very much a finite thing.

The benefit to the company is not limited to closing that single bug. When someone reports one bug, you likely are learning a new method and/or way of thinking in regards to the procedure/module/whatever is involved. One "reported" bug could likely make many dozens or more other bugs readily apparent in your code.

It also teaches your organization how to avoid that bug in the future. How many bugs were in the wild, being used by blackhats for YEARS through multiple iterations of a software package before being caught?

Also, you get to find the mistake in the code and, if you're managing your code correctly, you will know who made the mistake. So you can coach if it was something that should have been caught.

And lastly, it solidifies your place in the market as a leader. People study your code intently, use it more, get more involved. The more people involved, the bigger your talent pool, the more industry respect you have, and as a result the more people will look to you as a company that cares about the stability and long term viability of your product.

2 days ago
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Oracle Deflects Blame For Troubled Oregon Health Care Site

Charliemopps Re:It's Not Really Oracle (157 comments)

You could drop Oracle on a thousand carrot diamond and they'd still turn it into a steaming pile of shit. It's Oracle, it's what they do best.

3 days ago
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'Accidental' Siberian Mummies Part of Mysterious Ancient Arctic Civilization

Charliemopps Uh oh (34 comments)

I sure hope they're not stupid enough to remove those copper restraints. They were put there for a reason...

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt00...

3 days ago
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In Mississippi, Gov't Text Messages Are Officially Public Records

Charliemopps End result (33 comments)

The end result of this will be: The state decides it's too expensive to track and just disables text messaging on all their service plans.

3 days ago
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Mercedes Pooh-Poohs Tesla, Says It Has "Limited Potential"

Charliemopps Re:Myopic viewpoint (353 comments)

He has a valid point. Tesla only has one product. If they fail, the owners of those wild no longer have service plans or warranties. As much as Mercedes may or may not suck, they are definitely not going out of business any time soon. If you're spending $70k on a car and your options are between the two companies I could definitely see the appeal in sticking with a tried and true brand.

3 days ago
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Kepler-186f: Most 'Earth-Like' Alien World Discovered

Charliemopps Re:Better leave now (233 comments)

Actually, at 1g acceleration it would take about 11 years to reach the mid-point and another 11 to decelerate back to a resting frame rate. So 22 years to the traveler which is certainly doable. Of course to us on earth this would be over 500 years into the future due to time dilation. Also, I'm assuming we'd solve the problem of finding the enormous amounts of energy required for 22years of uninterrupted thrust, the spacecraft could operate flawlessly for that amount of time, and that the planet isn't moving at some ungodly speed in relation to us. I assumed it and earth are in the same reference frame which is clearly not the case.

3 days ago
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Snowden Queries Putin On Live TV Regarding Russian Internet Surveillance

Charliemopps Re:Useful Idiot (391 comments)

You know, when I first saw this I though "Oh God..." but after I had a few minutes to think about it, I came to the conclusion: I, nor anyone else here on slashdot, will ever do anything in our lifetimes as significant as what Edward Snowden did last year. And now he's in a very precarious situation. I suspect he could be used as a bargaining chip by Russia. So whatever he has to say to stay alive in the near future is ok with me. I'll not fault the guy. He already did his good deed for this lifetime.

3 days ago
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First Phase of TrueCrypt Audit Turns Up No Backdoors

Charliemopps Re:Technically if an NSA backdoor existed (171 comments)

The problem with the NSA is we have no idea what their capabilities are, technologically or legally. They are clearly violating the constitution already and there seems to be no one willing or capable of stopping them. So if they did come to you with a NSL, no matter how ridiculous or unconstitutional it was, what choice would you have? You could go to the media, but how embedded in the media are they? Do they have standing NSLs with all the media organizations out there? You could go outside the country, but those newspapers are government by their own countries version of the NSA who's working in close relationship with ours. This really is a Global totalitarian secret police state. They haven't started herding people into camps or anything, but really... what's to stop them?

about a week ago
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Will This Flying Car Get Crowdfunded?

Charliemopps Re:Doesn't matter if it gets funded. (157 comments)

Not if the flight mode is totally autonomous. Lets say you don't need interstates anymore. If you want to travel a large distance you drive to a platform somewhere and set your destination. The computer takes over and off you go. Once it lands a few hundred miles away you take over again.

about a week ago
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Private Keys Stolen Within Hours From Heartbleed OpenSSL Site

Charliemopps Re:Even root CA certificates may be at risk. (151 comments)

You would not believe what VP's will force you to do to get their $20 million flagship project out the door and then quickly forgotten about after the guy that was forced to do it quits in disgust. There was a time when I'd be surprised by insanely stupid security vulnerabilities but after a few years in the trade I've learned never to be surprised by anything.

about a week ago

Submissions

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NSA confirms it has been searching US citizens data without a warrent

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about three weeks ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "

There have been queries, using US person identifiers, of communications lawfully acquired to obtain foreign intelligence targeting non-US persons reasonably believed to be located outside the United States. These queries were performed pursuant to minimization procedures approved by the Fisa court and consistent with the statute and the fourth amendment.

Basically, if you communicated with someone that is "reasonably believed" to be a terrorist, you've lost constitutional protection against searches without a warrant according to the NSA. This directly contradicts what President Obama has said about the programs in the past."
Link to Original Source

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UK hospitals burning aborted babies for heat

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about a month ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "In what seems like the script right out of an 80s scifi or horror flick, the Telegraph reports that UK hospitals have been taking the remains of Aborted and miscarried fetuses and burning them, often for heat in the hospitals furnaces. The Telegraph claims the fetus to green energy program (my term) has incinerated over 15,000 dead babies so far.

One has to wonder if the heat generated by the babies could be augmented by the heat generated by the incoming rage of Christians and other religious folks in the next few weeks."

Link to Original Source
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NSA hacked Huawei, stole source code

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about a month ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "New documents from Snowden indicate that the NSA hacked into, and stole documents including source code from the Chinese networking firm Huawei. Ironically this is the same firm that the US Government has argued in the past was a threat due the Chinas possible use for the same sort of attacks the NSA committed."
Link to Original Source
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Amazons corporate office still uses CRTs! Also they want to deliver with drones

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 5 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "So the big story from tonight's 60 minutes is that Amazon wants to start delivering packages with drones. 60min seems astounded by this even though I think most of us on slashdot would say "well duh" but something I found a hell of a lot more interesting was the fact that their corporate office is stuffed full of aichent hardware. The staff are still using CRT monitors! Not only that, they show video from their factory floor and even their employees are still using CRTs. I'd think the cost to power those old monitors would have paid for LCDs by now but who knows."
Link to Original Source
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Dial 00000000 to blow up the world... no really

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 5 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "For 20 years the password for the US Nuclear arsenal was 00000000

Kennedy instituted a security system on all nuclear warheads to prevent them from being armed by someone unauthorized. It was called PAL, and promised to secure the entire US arsenal around the world. Unfortunately for Kenedy (and I guess, the whole world) US military leadership was more concerned about delaying a launch than securing Armageddon. They technical obeyed the order but then set the password to 8 Zeros or 00000000"

Link to Original Source
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US Citizens personal data shared amongst agencies.

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 5 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "Federal officials gathered customer records of 4,904 people from two men who were under criminal investigation for purportedly teaching people how to pass lie detector tests. The officials then distributed the list along with many of their Social Security numbers, addresses and professions – to nearly 30 federal agencies, including the Internal Revenue Service, the CIA, the National Security Agency and the Food and Drug Administration.

The unprecedented creation of such a list and decision to disseminate it widely demonstrate the ease with which the federal government can collect and share Americans’ personal information, even when there’s no clear reason for doing so.

Why is this so dangerous? Here's a little demo another Slashdotter posted recently: http://kieranhealy.org/blog/archives/2013/06/09/using-metadata-to-find-paul-revere/"

Link to Original Source
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The NSA is inside Googles cloud

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 6 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "Not much to say other than a new document has surfaced and the NSA has made their way inside Googles cloud. The most interesting part of the article is some google engineers reactions: "Two engineers with close ties to Google exploded in profanity when they saw the drawing. “I hope you publish this,” one of them said.""
Link to Original Source
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NSA scraping internet for address books

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 6 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "The NSA is collecting hundreds of millions of contact lists from all over the world, many of them belonging to Americans. The intercept them from instant messaging services as they move across global data links. The NSA is gathering contact lists in large numbers that amount to a sizable fraction of the world’s e-mail and instant messaging accounts."
Link to Original Source
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NSA data used by the DEA for common law enforcement

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 9 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "Reuters reports that a secret department at the DEA gathers tips from intelligence intercepts, wiretaps, informants and a massive database of telephone records then uses them to launch criminal investigations of Americans. Law enforcement agents have been directed to conceal how such investigations truly begin — not only from defense lawyers but also sometimes from prosecutors and judges.

A former federal agent in the northeastern United States who received such tips from SOD described the process. "You'd be told only, ‘Be at a certain truck stop at a certain time and look for a certain vehicle.' And so we'd alert the state police to find an excuse to stop that vehicle, and then have a drug dog search it," the agent said"

Link to Original Source
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Snowder re-applying for asylum in russia

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 9 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "In a meeting with Russian human rights activists today, Edward Snowden said he we re-apply for asylum in Russia. He plans to stay there temporarily while he attempts to find safe passage to South America. Weather he continues to release sensitive information while in Russia seems to be still up in the air as Putin has requested that he stop "Harming our American Partners""
Link to Original Source
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Fish oil linked to cancer

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 9 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "A team from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle found that those with the highest levels of omega-3 in their blood were 71 per cent more likely to develop fast-growing prostate tumors. The finding came while conducting another research project examining whether supplements of vitamin E and the mineral selenium can help prevent prostate cancer."
Link to Original Source
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The American Public: Edward Snowden is not a traitor

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 9 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "A new poll released Wednesday by Qunnipiac University finds that the vast majority of Americans thing that Edward Snowden is a whistle-blower, not a traitor. A mere 34% think he is a traitor 45% percent think the government’s anti-terrorism efforts go too far restricting civil liberties, a reversal from a January 10, 2010, survey.

"The fact that there is little difference now along party lines about the overall anti- terrorism effort and civil liberties and about Snowden is in itself unusual in a country sharply divided along political lines about almost everything. Moreover, the verdict that Snowden is not a traitor goes against almost the unified view of the nation's political establishment." — Peter Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute."

Link to Original Source
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New evidence confirms NSA tapping major fiber optic cables

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 9 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "New evidence released by the Washington Post confirms that the NSA is tapping major fiber optic cables as well as has direct access to the internal servers of Google, Apple, etc... despite their claim to the contrary. It seems that room 641A http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Room_641A is not just a conspiracy theory after all..."
Link to Original Source
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IRS exposed thousands of Social Security numbers relating to 527 groups

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 9 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "Here's an unusually detailed story of how the IRS mistakenly released a large amount of sensitive information to the internet recently. Several thousand social security numbers that were somehow related to 527 group donations were posted to the internet for several days and at least one download was made of the bulk data."
Link to Original Source
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Iain M. Banks Gets Asteroid Named after Him

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 9 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "On June 23rd, 2013, asteroid (5099) was officially named Iainbanks by the IAU, and will be referred to as such for as long as Earth Culture may endure.

(Iain M. Banks (1954-2013) was a Scottish writer best known for the Culture series of science ction novels; he also wrote ction as Iain Banks. An evangelical atheist and lover of whisky, he scorned social media and enjoyed writing music. He was an extra in Monty Python & The Holy Grail.)"

Link to Original Source
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Troll the NSA

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 10 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "A website has been started with idea of "Trolling the NSA" the creators, who clearly don't know anything about filtering, plan to have a large number of people all send the same message at the same time with lots of keywords thought to trigger NSA alerts.

Unfortunately, foiling such a prank is so trivial I wouldn't be surprised if a lot of the users email servers filter out the email as spam.

This is, however, a concept I've been toying with prior to finding out about this site. Could someone create a script that randomly populated your signature with such keywords? If we flood the NSA with nonsense random data would it not cause them problems? The script could even download random out of print books from google books and find/replace words with your keywords. It could be an interesting project."

Link to Original Source
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The FBI has the e-mails of nearly all US citizens - William Binney

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about a year ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "The FBI has the e-mails of nearly all US citizens, including congressional members, according to NSA whistleblower William Binney.

One of the best mathematicians and code breakers in NSA history resigned in 2001 because he no longer wanted to be associated with alleged violations of the constitution."

Link to Original Source
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U.S. regulators sue Intrade, Intrade blocks US accounts

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about a year ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "“We are sorry to announce that due to legal and regulatory pressures, Intrade can no longer allow US residents to participate in our real-money prediction markets,”

The CFTC’s civil complaint charged that Intrade and its operator solicited customers to trade investment contracts that technically are options. Options must be traded on approved, regulated exchanges.

Well... at least they're going after the real crooks right?"

Link to Original Source

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