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German Publishers Capitulate, Let Google Post News Snippets

Charliemopps Re:Free aggregation? A problem? (30 comments)

They didn't think it was bad. That's evident based on this story.
They wanted Googles money and tried to exploit outdated laws written 100yrs ago to modern technology to try and extort that money. You know, like what every other media organization that's currently dieing because of the internet is trying to do.

about an hour ago
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Austin Airport Tracks Cell Phones To Measure Security Line Wait

Charliemopps Sounds legit (133 comments)

I'm a huge privacy advocate... but how far are we going to go with this?
You're in a public place.
You're connecting to their network at various points.
They're using that info to figure out how long it takes for you to get through the line.

How is this any different than them using your check ins with your boarding pass?

"I just dumped the entire contents of my luggage in the middle of food court. I appreciate the offer to help me pick it up bu how dare you invade my privacy!"

3 hours ago
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Will the Google Car Turn Out To Be the Apple Newton of Automobiles?

Charliemopps Re:How hard is it to recognize a stoplight? (259 comments)

Really? Neon signs aren't above you? The car should stop for all red lights above 6ft tall?
What about that radio tower 2 miles away whose 50million candle power light has about the same luminosity at your location as a stoplight?

A better solution would be for google to start making the stoplight bulbs themselves, and have then pulse and a predetermined and invisible rate. It would be a cheap and easy solution.

3 hours ago
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Ello Formally Promises To Remain Ad-Free, Raises $5.5M

Charliemopps Re:G+? (137 comments)

Yes, I had him in my feed for a while and removed him promptly. Not a fun person to have in your feed.
https://plus.google.com/+Felic...
is probably the most entertaining person they have on there.

4 hours ago
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The Inevitable Death of the Internet Troll

Charliemopps Re:Hypocrisy (423 comments)

I'd say, get over yourselves. I just don't understand when the government decided it was part of its job to protect people from the real world. It's not like you're forced to join any particular online community. If I were harassed on slashdot to the point that I didn't like it, I could leave. If enough people left, the mods would have to police the site differently if they didn't want to lose all their users. It's up to each site to police itself. Some communities have basically no moderation. And that's fine, you need a thick skin to join them. Others are heavily moderated. My kid hangs out a lot on cartoon networks site. To chat in that system you can't actually type! You have to select words from drop down lists to for your phrase. It's impossible to bother someone with that system.

The problem is, people head over to reddit or something, and expect everyone there to act like they're in a public restaurant. The rude person in that situation is not the troll. Yes, I'm blaming the victim.

Oh... and if the "troll" is hacking their way around the sites content controls... sure... nail them for the hacking bit. But if you're within the sites guidelines? No way.

6 hours ago
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Will the Google Car Turn Out To Be the Apple Newton of Automobiles?

Charliemopps Re:How hard is it to recognize a stoplight? (259 comments)

Describe for me, programmatically, the difference between a stoplight and a taillight.
and a police light
and a neon sign
and every other red light on earth...

and also, please include all the many shapes and sizes of the various stoplights all over the country.

Stop signs have a very specific shape, and text printed on them. They do not very from place to place. They're piratically a damned bar code as far software is concerned. It's almost like they were designed for the task.

yesterday
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Raspberry Pi Founder Demos Touchscreen Display For DIY Kits

Charliemopps Re:After whast happened to Odroid-w, why? (79 comments)

Are we going to keep saying this forever? When are these things going to fall to the floor and become wrenches? (A wrench is a universally used device with no encumbrances, a true tool.)

  We want tools of computing to be as useful and flexible and free (in design) as cement, steel girders, wrenches and sockets, pencils and paper.

I have about $10k worth of patented tools out in my garage. Your continuous wrench examples are hilariously ironic considering Cement, Steel girders, wenches and sock, pencils and paper all have patents

You seem to think that the collective idea of a "Wrench" is the same as going to home depot to buy "Crescent Wrench" And I'll admit, those of us that use real tools tend to refer to them by their brand name. I call all my adjustable wrenches "Crescent Wrenches" because they made the first one I ever owned.

But the fact of the matter is, Crescent is a brand: http://www.crescenttool.com/wr...

They have all of their wrenches patented. And if you Gave the device we're talking about here the same patent treatment you did a Crescent wrench and tried to copy it like you want to, you'd get sued even more hardcore you dolt.

You are free to design your own Wrench, or development computer. You are not free to copy Crescent or Raspberries designs without their permission. I find it idiotic that I'm defending patents, as I don't like them much... but you're so far off the mark you're making the rest of us that support FSSOS look like idiots.

yesterday
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Judge Says EA Battlefield 4 Execs Engaged In "Puffery," Not Fraud

Charliemopps You know (90 comments)

You know... I was downtown, selling some fine imported watches to passers by, and a police officer did not find my excuse of "Puffery" nearly as understandable as this judge seems to. Apparently Puffery isn't not allowed at $100, but is at $100million. Interesting indeed. I need to raise my price point!

yesterday
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Microsoft, Ask.com, Oracle Latest To Be Sued Over No-Poach Deal

Charliemopps Re:Management only (47 comments)

The memo only talks about executives and product managers. Engineers (at ANY level) are explicitly excluded from the agreement (that is, they can be recruited at will), as well as any product "contributors".

So you think the existence of this agreement makes the existence of other, similar agreements, less likely? If you caught a burglar and he confessed to steeling your TV, would you assume he left the rest of your stuff alone?

But lets assume it does... you think that a no-poach agreement on executives and product managers would have no affect on the salary of Engineers? You don't think a lower salary for executives doesn't have an effect on the rest of the organization as a whole?

yesterday
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Astronomers Find Brightest Pulsar Ever Observed

Charliemopps Re:it's an electric universe baby (67 comments)

This is one of the areas I think the electric universe guys are correct about.

http://www.thunderbolts.info/t...

No they're not. Stop going to those websites. Everything on there is nonsense. Pulsars are a fairly well understood fenomena. Astronomers have found 1 observation out of billions of stars that contradicts their math, and they already have a plausible explanation for it.

yesterday
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Astronomers Find Brightest Pulsar Ever Observed

Charliemopps Re:New Object (67 comments)

My hypothesis is how black holes often work like a gravitational lens for light, they could be located in the right spot that in essence focuses the xray energy right onto our location.

Actually, something like that is in the story if you read it. It's a pulsar and the magnetic fields of which can lens the light just as you describe. No blackhole required.

yesterday
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Astronomers Find Brightest Pulsar Ever Observed

Charliemopps Re:New Object (67 comments)

Over a certain size, pretty much everything becomes some kind of star. Technically, even a blackhole is a star.

yesterday
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Raspberry Pi Founder Demos Touchscreen Display For DIY Kits

Charliemopps Re:After whast happened to Odroid-w, why? (79 comments)

I'd never heard of this controversy... but after looking it up, there's no proof rPI had anything to do with that... and even if they did, they kind of had a point. rPI is Not an open hardware project and never claimed to be. All the hacking people are using it for is welcome, but wasn't what they were going after in the beginning. You can't just copy other peoples closed source hardware.

yesterday
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Software Glitch Caused 911 Outage For 11 Million People

Charliemopps Re:backup for 911 (115 comments)

have your local police and fire phone numbers in your cell phone and posted next to your land line.

That is a great idea.
But, I used to handle 911 outages. Most 911 outages are due to cable cuts, which would often leave those facilities unreachable as well.

I'd say that if your phone works, and you can't call 911 or the local hospital, you should assume the trunk leading to those services (foolishly all usually located next to each other) is cut or damaged. So your next best bet would be to call a NON-LOCAL ER. i.e. Call the next town over. Just because downtown is broken doesn't mean the trunk leading to the next exchange is as well. We'd often route that way ourselves until it was fixed. So if you can call there, then they can radio to your local EMTs.

Also, a lot of times the local network is made up of all of these trunks, but your internet connection heads strait out of town. You might have better luck making a voip call or sending an email. A relative may be able to reach someone when you can't, etc... Text messages might be a good route as well, they are handled entirely different (though I've never dealt with that tech myself so take that with a grain of salt.)

yesterday
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Software Glitch Caused 911 Outage For 11 Million People

Charliemopps I used to handle this... (115 comments)

I used to work in the NOC for a large Telco and we'd handle 911 outages. Usually 911 goes down because the entire networks down. Like the switch failed, or the trunk from one area that leads to the area the 911 center is in would get cut. Most of this stuff is in a ring so there's usually an alternate route, but in some areas that's not physically possible. For example a remote mountain town with a single road in, would likely have its only trunk running along that same road and it'd get cut all the time as the road constantly needed repair. Chose where you live wisely.

We'd handle this in different ways depending on the situation. For example, if we had 4 trunks that could handle 4X number of calls, and 3 got cut so it could only handle 1X, we could actually prioritize certain numbers so 911 and emergency services would get priority. If the trunk leading to the 911 center failed, we could do something like re-route the calls to the local police dispatcher who literally had no warning and would suddenly have their phone ringing off the hook. You may say "you should warn them!" but our policy was "Get it done" because who's dieing while you're arguing with the dispatcher about how her days going to suck?

The most important skill you can have in any NOC is your ability to triage problems. That term comes from the medical world but it's just networking equipment... until you get into the situation I was in. And you're making triage decisions that could actually result in death. These were real engineers that really cared and did what they could. But when you have an area ravaged by hurricane and you tell the tech to put gas in generator 1 instead of 2, because you've been up for 30hrs strait... and a remote goes down so they can't call 911? I just couldn't detach myself from that. I took a pay cut to leave. A lot of people floated through that job, it wasn't just me. It takes a special kind of person that can detach themselves from the consequences of their decisions.

yesterday
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Xerox Alto Source Code Released To Public

Charliemopps Oh wow (119 comments)

Oh wow... it's like you spend your whole life understanding your childhood.

When I saw that image of the Sol-20, it immediately took me back to being 6yrs old. I'd go with my father to work in a manufacturing plant. He ran "The lab" and up until the late 70s, they'd program their machines with an infrared laser onto a chip... and it was a nightmare because it took hours and if anyone turned on a light it would ruin the etch. Then these computers started showing up with floppy drives and the first one I remember seeing looked exactly like that Sol-20. I'm assuming that's what it was. I got to type on it for fun a couple of times. Later they swapped to Commador's, apple IIs, IBM clones, etc... whatever was cheap.

This was probably the first computer I ever touched. Wow!

yesterday
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Favorite clickbait hook?

Charliemopps Re:Click Here (234 comments)

"click here to answer stupid poll question / find out how you rank"

...and me without mod points...
+10 hilarious

2 days ago
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Ask Slashdot: Event Sign-Up Software Options For a Non-Profit?

Charliemopps Re:Easy (104 comments)

For what is almost certainly a few cosmetic touches to an existing app (that is likely only a couple hundred lines of code to start with) that would take probably 15 minutes to do, you'd charge $150k without any warranty of working, and then basically charge enough to nearly dedicate one reasonable (entry level) full time employee to an app that probably isn't used at all about 11 months out of the year?

Yes ... and I'd like to point out a few key phrases in your statement that prove why I'd do this...
 

that would take probably 15 minutes to do

Booting up my computer and logging into all my various apps would take longer than that so...

charge enough to nearly dedicate one reasonable (entry level) full time employee

Entry level people can't debug code. They make bugs, they don't fix them. You want someone to create new accounts for you? That's what this person can do. Debug a production website while the president of the company is on the phone screaming in your ear that they'll eat your children for breakfast if this isn't up NOW I charge a lot for that.

without any warranty of working

It would meet their needs at the time of release. that would be in the contract. In 6 months, when they install their new single signon app that wasn't in the original design specs and it breaks... I should fix that for free? You have to keep in mind, I have to be available now to fix it. They aren't going to be ok with calling me, saying its broken in the middle of their peak signup time, and have me say "Well, I'm at my real job... you know the one that pays the bills, I'll get to this next Saturday" No, they wont. So if I'm going to drop my life to fix this, I need money to cover that.

isn't used at all about 11 months out of the year

and the amount a webpage is used is relevant how? and how do you know it's used that much? I'd be willing to charge for support per month. $10k/month. How's that?

I've seen quotes from a very good development company that has always delivered come in at about $10k for work significantly harder than this subject.

Congratulations. Just so you know how that works, that place already has the site built. They change a few things here and there... likely have widgets or whatever depending on what they use. Great. So your $10k quote was to modify an existing codebase that they already have a team of people intimately familiar with. But this clients already flat out rejected that. They want volunteers to write a webapp from the ground up that they own and maintain. That's an entirely different ballgame. That's a Major, enterprise level effort. The sort of thing companies like Google, IBM, Apple pull off over periods of months or years. A team of 4 volunteers in a basement? Good luck.

I'm sorry, but you clearly have no idea how enterprise projects work. I once saw a company pay $22,000 for a single line of code. This included 1yr of support and it was considered a steal. This was years ago, my managers and said "I cold write that in 10min!!!" My boss laughed at me and asked me the following:
1. In 6 months from now, will you still be here? You can't leave for a year... period, and have to sign a contract stating as such. Even if we fire you, you still have to fix it.
2. Are you insured? You need a minimum of a $1million liability policy in case we need to sue you.
3. Do you have a track record of completed work? We need this done, and should you fail and I have to go to shareholders to tell them we took this key project to "some guy" to save $22k, and he screwed up so we lost $100k in sales... what do you think is going to happen to me? In other words, we're not paying $20k for the code, we're paying $20k for peace of mind. We wont have to worry about this. We would have to worry about you.

Now, I know your arguments going to be "Well, it's not that big of a site" or "They wont be that harsh"
B.S.
Their existing site is worthless to an incoming developer. It would take you longer to parse and understand his code than it would to start from scratch. And their expectations? Everyone's expectations change once they've written a check. It's all smiles and hugs until the sites down. You paid some random local guy $10k to throw up a Joomla site for you? That's nice... I'm happy that's worked out for you so far. But when that site goes down 2 days before Christmas, the guys on vacation in italy with your $10k and doesn't answer the phone... you lose so much business you're on the verge of bankruptcy and find out he's been working out of his moms basement, and you can't even sue him? You might start to see what I'm talking about.

2 days ago

Submissions

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Physisists observer the Majorana fermion for the first time

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about three weeks ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "For the first time Princeton University scientists have observed a Majorana fermion. A long predicted but never observed exotic particle that acts as both matter and anti-matter. The material is surprisingly stable. Being in both states at once seems to make it act very weakly with its surrounding. This could also be a major step towards quantum computing."
Link to Original Source
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FBI angry with Apple and Google for new security features

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about a month ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "Recently Apple and Google implimented new encryption that will make it difficult for law enforcement to retrieve data from a locked device even when they have a valid search warent. Apparently the FBI is not very happy with either company. On Thursday FBI Director James B. Comey said:

There will come a day when it will matter a great deal to the lives of people... that we will be able to gain access” to such devices, Comey told reporters in a briefing. “I want to have that conversation [with companies responsible] before that day comes

"

Link to Original Source
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Hewlett-Packard pleads guilty to Bribery

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about a month and a half ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "Hewlett-Packard and three subsidiaries pleaded guilty Thursday to paying bribes to foreign officials in Russia, Mexico and Poland and agreed to pay $108 million in criminal and regulatory penalties. For over 10 years Hewlett-Packard kept 2 sets of books to track slush-funds they used to bribe government officials for favorable contracts."
Link to Original Source
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Verizon to offer discounted data rates to apps purchased through their app store

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 2 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "Verizon, in a clear attempt at an end run around net neutrality rules, is prepared to launch another new app store. Their last app store failed miserably. But this new one will offer a new feature, discounted data rates for apps purchased through it as well as billing directly through the carrier.

Here's a link to the summary of the article, the original is pay-walled."

Link to Original Source
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The President supports Net Neutrality

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 2 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "

One of the issues around net neutrality is whether you are creating different rates or charges for different content providers. That's the big controversy here. So you have big, wealthy media companies who might be willing to pay more and also charge more for spectrum, more bandwidth on the Internet so they can stream movies faster. I personally, the position of my administration, as well as a lot of the companies here, is that you don’t want to start getting a differentiation in how accessible the Internet is to different users. You want to leave it open so the next Google and the next Facebook can succeed.

— President Obama"
Link to Original Source

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Homeland security investigating the leak of a movie

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 3 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "Recently a high quality copy of the new movie "Expendables III" showed up on various torrent sites. Lionsgate filed suit against the torrent site and 10 "John doe" uploads that supposedly leaked the movie. They not only want to stop the piracy they expect the sites to "actively try and recover all copies of the film." After several calls to different law enforcement agencies, Homeland security has taken up the investigation. Because pirates are terrorists?"
Link to Original Source
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Climate Science just got even more complicated

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 3 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "Shaun Lovejoy, a researcher at McGill University in Canada and long time Climate change advocate has released a new study that concludes recent pauses in global temperature rise are consistent with statistical models. This furthers the problem of finding direct evidence to convince a skeptical public."
Link to Original Source
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People can actually be allergic to Electronic devices

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 3 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "People can actually be allergic to Electronic devices, just not for the reasons you think. The influx of Tablets and SmartPhones with ever ever more attempts to stand out from the crowd, many are being produce with metal parts and cases that sometimes contain the metal Nickel. Nickel can be an allergen. Most people do not regularly have direct contact with Nickel and therefore aren't aware of their allergy. But with the influx Phones and Tablets with metal cases, many are finding out about their allergy for the first time the hard way. If you suspect you may be allergic to your cellphone, you can be tested by your doctor... but it wont involve a Wifi router!"
Link to Original Source
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FTC Files suit against Amazon for in-app purchases

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 3 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "The Federal Trade Commission has filed suit against Amazon for illegally billing parents for in-app purchases of digital goods (My kid bought 100 slingshots on angry-birds) prior to requiring a password for making purchases. Is Google next?"
Link to Original Source
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LinkedIn spam lawsuit can continue

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 4 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "A lawsuit filed in September 2013 in the Northern District of California alleged that LinkedIn mislead its users about the number of times it would attempted to invite their contacts using their name. LinkedIn tried to get the suit dismissed but Thursday Judge Lucy Koh ruled the suit can continue."
Link to Original Source
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Vodafone admits warentless wiretaping

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 5 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "According to Vodafone 29 governments have installed equipment that collects data on its customers without a warrant. This includes metadata, location, data, and voice. This is a rather long, and very interesting report. Vodafone is the first telecommunications company to voluntarily release this kind of information."
Link to Original Source
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Google EasterEgg pokes fun at the NSA

Charliemopps Charliemopps writes  |  about 5 months ago

Charliemopps (1157495) writes "A few months ago it was revealed that the NSA had been spying on Googles customers according to documents released by Edward Snowned.

In one image NSA staff joked "SSL added and removed here! :-)

Recently Google released a Chrome extention designed to combat this. People who have reviewed the code found an Easter Egg left for the NSA by Google. Interesting times indeed."

Link to Original Source

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