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MIT Removes Online Physics Lectures and Courses By Walter Lewin

Chuck Chunder Re:Sexual Harassment shouldn't cost us knowledge (416 comments)

Deleting all of Cosby's TV shows and movies would still be wrong as they are a part of our cultural history.

No one is doing that though, there is a difference between no longer promoting something and erasing it from history.

To stretch the Cosby link further, you might (quite reasonably) think things Cosby did in the past are funny and even have value beyond pure humour, as social commentary etc. If that were the case and you know someone who had been abused by Cosby, would you choose to put a Cosby video on for them and expect them to find it an enjoyable experience?

That is the situation MIT is in. They aren't just dealing with 'theoretical' students who might somehow be deprived of some value that only those videos can impart. They are dealing with real students actually effected by the situation at hand.

If you wouldn't knowingly ask someone you care about to be entertained by someone who had abused them, why would you expect MIT to ask someone to be educated by someone who harassed them?

about two weeks ago
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MIT Removes Online Physics Lectures and Courses By Walter Lewin

Chuck Chunder Re:Just wondering... (416 comments)

If you can't separate presenter from content, that's your serious character flaw, leave the rest of us out of it.

If you were someone taking the course who had been harassed by him would you consider it a "serious character flaw" not to be able to "separate presenter from the content"?

I imagine a lot of people might find that difficult and wouldn't need to have a "serious character flaw" to struggle with it. I think it's entirely reasonable for MIT to ditch (and replace) the content if it means the effected people can continue on with their education without having the chap popping up in their courseware.

I don't think it makes sense to worry about the (theoretical) "students (...) punished by removing good lectures" and not consider the (evidently real) students actually effected by what has happened.

about two weeks ago
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MIT Removes Online Physics Lectures and Courses By Walter Lewin

Chuck Chunder Re:Not a Proportional Reaction (416 comments)

How does taking them down in any way help the victim(s)?

If they are still taking the courses or might want to continue on taking other courses that contained his videos it probably helps them not to have to sit through his lectures any more.

about two weeks ago
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MIT Removes Online Physics Lectures and Courses By Walter Lewin

Chuck Chunder Re:Just wondering... (416 comments)

Probably not much for the average person.

However I think that if there are people he harassed taking the courses (or who might like to take further courses in future) then it isn't a bad idea to cut him out of them rather than ask those people to interact with him further, even relatively passively on video.

Even if the lectures are high quality, they probably aren't irreplaceable.

about two weeks ago
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Flaw in New Visa Cards Would Let Hackers Steal $1M Per Card

Chuck Chunder Re:Well... no. (126 comments)

True, but how is that any different to the normal situation where the maximum amount is £20?

Arguably it could make the attack more worthwhile. The effort and hit rate involved might not make it worthwhile at low ticket amount (might as well have a real job) but could be worthwhile as the money starts going up.

Realistically though it sounds like the attacker needs a merchant account to benefit (and presumably enough legitimate volume to hide the fraudulent transactions in without raising suspicions). From the sounds of it the biggest problem would occur if you were actually overseas and you were using your card in cafes and the like. Then perhaps an unscrupulous vendor might be able to get close enough to charge your card without you noticing and you might not notice it as fraudulent when you got your statement.

about 2 months ago
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Sony Tosses the Sony Reader On the Scrap Heap

Chuck Chunder Re:That kinda sucks (172 comments)

That fell apart because Sony didn't anticipate what direction things would take, letting Apple overtake them along with just about everyone else.

I don't think that's quite right. Sony did anticipate the direction things were going take, they just tried to control it too tightly and had an overinflated idea of their own power to steer things. I think the Sony Network Walkman predates the iPod. I had an NW-MS9 and I think in many ways it (and the earlier versions) were ahead of their time. Tiny, digital, sleek, even the name "Network" hints and some anticipation of a future of medialess distribution.

However they utterly ballsed up the execution. Partly on the software side (the associated software was an absolute dog which seemed to go out of it's way to make things painful) but mostly because they were trying to own the future with their MagicGate DRM (which they even seemed to be trying to sell as something exciting for the consumer, though it was responsible for much of the pain in using the software) and codec restrictions.

Sony saw the future, they just wanted to own it and in trying to do so produced something that served them more than it served the buyer.

about 5 months ago
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Startup Out of MIT Promises Digital Afterlife — Just Hand Over Your Data

Chuck Chunder Re:All of this has happened before... (241 comments)

Black Mirror is an absolutely awesome series (though perhaps series isn't the right word as each episode is standalone). Well worth watching.

about a year ago
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AMC Theaters Allegedly Calls FBI to Interrogate a Google Glass Wearer

Chuck Chunder Re:Lesson from this story...don't be a glass hole! (1034 comments)

I don't think it's unbelievable that the FBI (or whoever) were called. If a crime is suspected then I don't think it's unreasonable to report that suspicion. (Similarly in this recently reported case, I don't think it's unreasonable for authorities to be informed, it would possibly be more outrageous if there was a possible breach that authorities weren't informed about).

However the 'authorities' in question should be capable of responding to those reports in a sensible fashion.

about a year ago
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Data Analysts Attempt To Predict World's Largest Music Vote, Again

Chuck Chunder Re: Winner! (41 comments)

That seems like a somewhat pessimistic view, a glance through the historical results shows some pretty solid songs (and some quirky ones) http://www.abc.net.au/triplej/... If course, they aren't all Bohemian Rhapsody's, but there's only ever been one if them.

about a year ago
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U.S. Teenagers Are Driving Much Less: 4 Theories About Why

Chuck Chunder Analysis too shallow (635 comments)

Picture this scenario. Ten guys and ten girls live together. All ten of the guys have slept with five of the girls in the house within the first ten days. That makes them promiscuous. However, five of the girls engaged in no sexual activity whatsoever. That gives us a 100% male promiscuity rate, and a 50% female promiscuity rate.

If we're going to discuss this properly then I think we need more info on any possible threesomes.

about a year ago
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Mozilla Is Mapping Cell Towers and WiFi Access Points

Chuck Chunder Re:Privacy (113 comments)

I think you are misunderstanding what I meant. In my example "Y" was the stationary AP, you as "A" can't see any packets from it directly because you are out of range, but you can see data being sent by "X" to "Y" (as "X" is in range of both you and "Y"). As I understand it by looking at the packets being sent to "Y" from "X" you can know enough about "Y" to add it to your geolocation data even if you haven't observed any data from it directly.

about a year ago
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Mozilla Is Mapping Cell Towers and WiFi Access Points

Chuck Chunder Re:Privacy (113 comments)

There's no need to ever actually connect to any network to map them, just slurp up SSID broadcasts, maybe channel and signal strength.

You don't need to 'connect' to them but IIRC there is some benefit to looking at the traffic beyond mere broadcasts. IE if you can see device X sending traffic to Y you can begin to imply the position of Y even if you can't see it that device yourself because it's too far away from you.

A <------ X <-------> Y

Moz might not be doing that and perhaps it isn't a "need" but if the goal is to get the best data it's not correct to say that deeper analysis than mere SSID broadcast doesn't have benefits. Of course if you are looking deeper then you should be paying attention to any possible privacy implications and avoiding recording anything that could be considered 'content'.

about a year ago
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Target Confirms Point-of-Sale Malware Was Used In Attack

Chuck Chunder Re:Cash only economy (250 comments)

Right. With credit cards, you're basically getting free insurance paid for by people who keep loads of interest-bearing debt.

Don't be silly. That money stays with the financial institutions involved. Any money that needs to be refunded due to fraud comes from the merchants who accepted the card (with a hefty fee attached too).

about a year ago
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End of Moore's Law Forcing Radical Innovation

Chuck Chunder Re:dumbest thing I've read all day (275 comments)

It's not a fallacy, you didn't understand. People are saying that limited computation facilities will encourage innovation. If limited computation facilities encourage, nay, force innovation, then limiting it even more should force even more innovation.

Why should it? That seems like an obvious fallacy. Limiting us to abacuses would just mean people would be looking to improve on the abacus. Limitations in silicon means people looking at alternatives to silicon (just as limitations with vacuum tubes meant people looked for better alternatives and the transistor).

Perhaps in 60 years the basic components of today's technology will look as quaint and old timey as vacuum tubes do today. If we are just using iteratively improved versions of todays integrated circuits then that might be somewhat disappointing.....

about a year ago
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End of Moore's Law Forcing Radical Innovation

Chuck Chunder Re:dumbest thing I've read all day (275 comments)

That's basically how you sound.

How I sound? You really should work on your reading comprehension, I was merely explaining what the article was saying.

about a year ago
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End of Moore's Law Forcing Radical Innovation

Chuck Chunder Re:dumbest thing I've read all day (275 comments)

That may have been the dumbest thing you've read all day but to be fair that was before your comment was written.

The intent behind that sentence seems fairly clear, that the end of predictable speed increases may lead to greater focus on whole other avenues of development and other unpredictable and exciting ideas popping up.

about a year ago
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The FBI's Giant Bitcoin Wallet

Chuck Chunder You aren't being pedantic (177 comments)

Indeed, a pedant would be right, you are just inventing a distinction where there is none.

1 year,6 days
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Code.org Wants Participating Students' Data For 7 Years

Chuck Chunder Re:Self-serving philanthropy (90 comments)

Centralizing control over analysis of student performance data --- taking the capability away from teachers to evaluate how a program is really working, and placing it in the hands of

You seem to view this as a zero sum game.

Additional central analytics doesn't necessarily take capabilities away from teachers. It could inform and help them.

Anything can be used badly, it seems to me the fight should be to use analytics well, not stop it being used.

1 year,25 days

Submissions

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Pedofile security through obscurity

Chuck Chunder Chuck Chunder writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Chuck Chunder (21021) writes "A pedophile who has distributed obfusctated images of himself on the internet may be about to learn that security through obscurity is not much security at all. Computer specialists in Germany's federal police have reversed image manipulations intended to obscure his face to obtain pretty clear images of the offender. Analysis of other parts of the image has not lead to any concrete leads so INTERPOL are now asking for public help in identifying him."
Link to Original Source
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Chuck Chunder Chuck Chunder writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Chuck Chunder (21021) writes "I have bought a Wii (having previously owned an XBox and a Playstation) and am really enjoying it. It is a load of fun and I get a real kick out of seeing non gamers pick up a controller and enjoy themselves. However the fact remains that someone with general gaming experience will get to grips with a game a lot faster than someone without experience. This fact makes most of the "newbie friendliness" of the Wii moot when playing competative multiplayer games.

If my girlfriend and I play such a game (eg Sports, Rayman or Monkeyball) then it isn't much fun for either of us if I win all the time. The most fun we have had together with the Wii so far has been working through the single player part of Rayman, taking it in turns to face a challenge.

By doing that we both have some success and take part in the progression. Given that the Wii is reaching out to a broad range of people and multiple users on the same console I am thinking there should be plenty of collaborative (non FPS) games which players of varying skill levels can all play at once and have some success in. Am I missing some titles or is this a hole in the current Wii lineup?"

Journals

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Flamebait?

Chuck Chunder Chuck Chunder writes  |  more than 10 years ago Is calling people "fucking morons" flamebait, or is the flamebait people being "fucking morons" in the first place?

You be the judge I guess.

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