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Comments

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Amazon "Suppresses" Book With Too Many Hyphens

ClickOnThis Re:from the what-until-they-get-a-load-of-this dep (238 comments)

The hyphens make clear that you are using a compound adjective. In fact, a common error in writing is omitting hyphens when they are necessary. For example, someone writing I saw a man eating alligator probably meant I saw a man-eating alligator .

This, this and this.

Awhile ago, we saw a story on this site about a chocolate printer. Of course this was actually a chocolate-printer, a device that prints using chocolate. However, without the hyphen, it refers to a printer that is made out of chocolate. Without the hyphen, what are we to make of The Chocolate Lover's Cookbook?

Hyphens are also important when one needs to disambiguate between compound adjectives and compound nouns. What's a high school building? A building that's a high school (a high-school building) or a school building that is high (a high school-building)?

Hyphens are just another example of how we treat punctuation marks as though they were boogers, something to be expunged and discarded, kept away from ourselves and others. But without them, we cannot distinguish a panda bear who eats shoots and leaves from a mob hit-man who eats, shoots and leaves.

4 hours ago
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Ask Slashdot: Is an Open Source .NET Up To the Job?

ClickOnThis Re:Why bother? (395 comments)

I have always preferred .NET to Java,

Why? A sincere question, not a snark. Is it multi-programing-language support? The Microsoft IDE (VS?) What is it that wins over the Java ecosystem?

with the main drawback to .NET is that in the past its cross-platform functionality has been quite limited.

Until Mono came along, I assume you mean. I have little experience with Mono. Those who do, please weigh in: does Mono offer equivalent cross-platform flexibility to Java run-time environments?

2 days ago
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Quantum Physics Just Got Less Complicated

ClickOnThis Re: Science, bitches, that's *how* it works! (195 comments)

It is approximately right, but completely wrong. These are not mutually exclusive. Arguing approximations are perfectly accurate is itself a grave error.

You're abusing the semantics of "right" and "wrong" in a scientific context. A theory or law is "right" if it agrees with observations or predictions to within the accuracy of measurements. It is "wrong" if it doesn't. On that basis, Newtonian physics is "right" over a vast domain of experience, but is "wrong" in situations involving atomic particles or near-light speeds. It is not "completely wrong" -- not at all.

BTW, nobody says approximations are perfectly accurate. That's the same as saying they're perfect, and that would mean they cease to be approximations.

We do use Newtonian Physics, not because they are correct (they are not) but rather because their approximations are within tolerances of certain deviations from accurate.

Again, you abuse semantics. Scientists do not use the word "correct" in the sense of an absolute truth, but rather in the sense of what works to make accurate predictions. Science endeavors to shrink-wrap the tightest possible boundary around "absolute" truth, but does not claim to know what that truth is.

3 days ago
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Cause and Effect: How a Revolutionary New Statistical Test Can Tease Them Apart

ClickOnThis Re:What if there is a third party? (136 comments)

Not to mention A causes X and B causes Y. You know, a coincidence.

One would assume that multiple trials would cause A and B to occur at different times, thus eliminating any perceived correlation between X and Y.

4 days ago
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Top Five Theaters Won't Show "The Interview" Sony Cancels Release

ClickOnThis Re:Home of the brave? (582 comments)

Never mind. GOP = "Guardians of Peace", per the linked article.

4 days ago
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NASA Tests Feasibility of 3D Printing on the Moon and Other Planets

ClickOnThis Re:WTF (58 comments)

Well played. Somebody mod this guy up.

4 days ago
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Top Five Theaters Won't Show "The Interview" Sony Cancels Release

ClickOnThis Re:Home of the brave? (582 comments)

Do *I* think GOP has the ability to pull off such attacks? Probably not. Not at scale. But could they hit one theatre? I'm not willing to take that bet. They've shown they're deep in Sony's business and even if it *isn't* GOP, there's enough crazy in this country to get copycats and sympathizers going if given a push.

What does the GOP have to do with any of this? I'm no Republican, but really, I think it's crazy to talk about them sponsoring attacks on theaters.

Unless GOP means something else here? "Government of P*?" Please enlighten.

4 days ago
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The Case For Flipping Your Monitor From Landscape to Portrait

ClickOnThis Re: Have Both (567 comments)

Somebody please mod the parent clueful. Thanks for the improvement.

about two weeks ago
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The Case For Flipping Your Monitor From Landscape to Portrait

ClickOnThis Re:Have Both (567 comments)

I use my monitor rotated in portrait mode and rotated 270 degrees.

What kind of pr0n are you looking at?

about two weeks ago
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The Case For Flipping Your Monitor From Landscape to Portrait

ClickOnThis Re: Have Both (567 comments)

A general ergonomic rule-of-thumb is to adjust your monitor's vertical position so that the top edge is level with your eyes and you don't need to look upwards. A portrait-orientation of your monitor makes that objective difficult to achieve.

about two weeks ago
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CIA Lied Over Brutal Interrogations

ClickOnThis Re: Really? (772 comments)

It's not enough to kill the perps, you have to kill somebody helpless that's important to them. Torture a man's wife and small child then give him a gun with no bullets!!!

Wow. Classy. The way to combat terror is to be a terrorist?

Suffering the sins of the father on the son has been recognized as unjust since Old Testament times, and probably earlier.

about two weeks ago
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CIA Lied Over Brutal Interrogations

ClickOnThis Re:Justice (772 comments)

Specifically, he didn't have the IRS on his side. It was tax evasion (not his other misdeeds) that put him in jail.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Are Any Certifications Worth Going For?

ClickOnThis Re: Just Lie (317 comments)

That's not what I meant, and you know it.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Are Any Certifications Worth Going For?

ClickOnThis Re:Just Lie (317 comments)

I think you guessed it by now I am a very ethical person albeit not a very moral one.

Do you understand the difference between morality and ethics?

Morality is an innate sense of what is right by ourselves and others.

Ethics is an attempt to codify morality into an organized system of knowledge.

If you think you're ethical but not moral, then you care more about following the rules than you do about what the rules are supposed to achieve.

about two weeks ago
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Ask Slashdot: Are Any Certifications Worth Going For?

ClickOnThis Re:Just Lie (317 comments)

However, the best reason to not lie is that it is not ethical. ALWAYS do the ethical thing. Stay above the fray, tell the truth and get the certifications for real. It may take longer and be harder, but in the long run it will be worth it.

This.

Integrity is more important than education.

about two weeks ago
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Ultrasound Used To Create Haptics That Can Be Touched and Felt

ClickOnThis Obligatory (41 comments)

Internet rule 34. How long will it take?

about two weeks ago
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Game Theory Analysis Shows How Evolution Favors Cooperation's Collapse

ClickOnThis Re:Taxpayer's Dilemma (213 comments)

You can not pay taxes, but have decent infrastructures, and you can pay taxes, but still have lousy infrastructure, or no infrastructure at all.

Citation please? Your link to Noam Chomsky's 40-second video has nothing to do with your claim.

about three weeks ago
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Game Theory Analysis Shows How Evolution Favors Cooperation's Collapse

ClickOnThis Re:Where's that "-1 Obtuse" moderation? (213 comments)

I don't need police if I can carry a weapon to defend myself.

And what if, God forbid, someone rapes and murders someone you love? Do you and your weapon have the resources to find justice? If your answer is yes, then you are truly scary. The rest of us have evolved beyond your vigilante philosophy.

Where can I sign up to carry a gun, not pay the police, not pay for schools, not pay for libraries (I actually buy my books, don't rent them), but pay for firemen?

Uh ... nowhere? You can't have everything the way you want it.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Giving a voice to ALS patients

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  about 10 months ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "We are all familiar with the speech synthesizer used by Stephen Hawking, famous physicist and ALS patient. He has heard the synthesizer's accent described as Scandinavian, American or Scottish although he has learned to identify with it. But what if an ALS patient could speak with her/his own voice? Former helicopter mechanic and now ALS patient Cal Moore can do just that. Moore, with the help of speech pathologist Roberta Kelley at Seattle's Virginia Mason Hospital, began recording his own voice years ago, before the disease began to affect his speech. He can play back, in his own voice, phrases such as "I feel tired", "You know what? Your driving sucks" and others. The process, known as voice-banking, was invented by speech pathologist John Costello at Boston Children's Hospital. Granted, it's not exactly a synthesizer, and obviously it requires sampling of the patient's unaffected voice in advance. But couldn't this be a precursor to other technologies that could synthesize arbitrary phrases in a patient's own voice, from pre-sampled phonemes?"
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Programmer Outsources His Own Job to China

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  about 2 years ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "A USA-based programmer with Verizon oursourced his own job to a third-party contractor in Shenyang, China. He got away with the ruse for months until Verizon became suspicious of the traffic on his home-office VPN, and noticed that his in-office activities were perfunctory. From the article: "[T]he employee — identified only as “Bob” — used his 9-to-5 hours to peruse Reddit, watch cat videos, update his Facebook profile and shop on eBay." He paid the contractor $50,000 of his six-figure salary annually, and pocketed the difference. What is particularly irksome is that many blog posts on the Verizon website are praising him for his "business savvy.""
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Laser Technology May Reduce Military Friendly-Fire

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  more than 2 years ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "CNN has a story on the use of laser-based identification technologies to reduce friendly-fire incidents. From the article: 'The DCID-TALON works when its user spots a target in his or her scope. The shooter aims the device, which sends an encoded message by laser beam. If the target is friendly, the message will reflect off of the target’s retroreflectors (they are the size of a postage stamp and can be embedded in the soldier’s helmet and uniform; each soldier would be outfitted with multiple retroreflectors), and the device will display the word "friend."'"
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Nokia: Linux Needs to Learn Business

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  more than 6 years ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "BusinessWeek.com has an article on a speech given by Dr. Ari Jaaksi, VP of Nokia, at the Handset World conference. He claimed open-source software developers need to be "educated" on how the mobile industry works, particularly on the "business rules" that they need to obey, which include embracing "DRM, IPR [intellectual property rights], SIM locks and subsidised business models." From the article: "Why do we need closed vehicles? We do," he said. "Some of these things harm the industry but they're here [as things stand]. These are touchy, emotional issues but this dialogue is very much needed. As an industry, we plan to use open-source technologies but we are not yet ready to play by the rules; but this needs to work the other way round too." There is also some discussion about Maemo, the Linux OS that runs on Nokia's N800-series tablets, as well as Nokia's recent acquisition of Trolltech (makers of the Qt widget kit) and possible consequences for the mobile application market."
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Donald Trump's "Celebrity Apprentice" [rev

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  more than 6 years ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "[a few corrections and additions...]

Candidates I'd like to see on Donald Trump's "Celebrity Apprentice"

OJ Simpson
Jenna Jameson
Richard Stallman
Kevin Mitnick
Alberto Gonzales
Uwe Boll
Hello Kitty Robo
The "Duke Nukem Forever" development team
A Beowulf cluster of Cowboy Neals"
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Donald Trump's "Celebrity Apprentice"

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  more than 6 years ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "People I'd like to see on Donald Trump's "Celebrity Apprentice"

OJ Simpson
Jenna Jameson
Richard Stallman
Alberto Gonzales
Uwe Boll
Hello Kitty Robo
The "Duke Nukem Forever" development team
A Beowulf cluster of Cowboy Neals"
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FCC opens door for US media consolidation

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  about 7 years ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "The Guardian has a story about Tuesday's 3-2 vote by the FCC in the USA to relax significantly the media ownership rules set in 1975. These rules were put in place to prevent a single individual or company from controlling too many sources of information in a city. Critics are understandably concerned with the effects of such consolidation on minority businesses and the public interest, not to mention the suppression of dissenting viewpoints. Of particular concern is the Commission's decision to have a short 30-day period for public comment, instead of the usual 90 days. From the article: '"The agency has treated the public like children allowed to visit the cockpit on an airliner," Democratic commissioner Michael Copps said, "not allowed to fly the plane but allowed a brief false moment to believe they are".' Curiously, the story has had no discernable coverage in the US media. One wonders why..."
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OpenOffice 2.3 released

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "Surely I'm not the only one who noticed that OpenOffice.org has announced the release of version 2.3. From the website: "Available for download now, OpenOffice.org 2.3 incorporates an extensive array of new features and enhancements to all its core components, and protects users from newly discovered security vulnerabilities. It is a major release and all users should download it. Plus: It is only with 2.3 that users can make full use of our growing extensions library." You can download it but be kind and use a P2P client instead, such as bittorrent."
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ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  more than 8 years ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "CNN reports that the space shuttle Discovery will be launched on December 6, in part to avoid concerns about operating the shuttle through midnight on New Year's Eve. From the article: The worry is that shuttle computers aren't designed to make the change from the 365th day of the old year to the first day of the new year while in flight. NASA has never had a shuttle in space December 31 or January 1. "We've just never had the computers up and going when we've transitioned from one year to another," said Discovery astronaut Joan Higginbotham. "We're not really sure how they're going to operate." The article goes on to explain that the decision was simply one of prudence, because the shuttle hasn't been certified to fly in that time period."
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ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  more than 8 years ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "CNN reports that Intel and the University of California, Santa Barbara have announced the development of a hybrid silicon laser that could lead to dramatic improvements in the speed and cost of computer systems and data networks. From the article: "The development makes it possible to use laser light rather than wires to send data between chips, addressing one of the major hurdles in advancing the use of so-called "silicon photonics" in computers and data centers". The press release on the Intel website has additional details."

Journals

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ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  more than 8 years ago

Electronic voting machines have been an incendiary topic on Slashdot for a very long time, and for good reason. Software errors, cheesy hardware, political patronage to put them in place, strong-arm tactics by the manufacturers to cover up flaws, not to mention the impossibility of verifying results...there's not much to like. And it seems that any technically-minded person is (rightly) well aware of the vulnerabilities of e-voting, and is unequivocally in favor of a paper trail to verify voter intent.

Obviously I come to bury e-voting, not to praise it. But there is something that continues to trouble me as very strange: the consistent reports of unreliability in the software that runs these machines. How can it be that difficult to write software that simply counts votes? It seems like a straightforward exercise in software engineering. Yet the problems with voting machines appear to be far out of proportion to their inherent technical simplicity.

Only for the sake of argument, let's ask: are the programmers that write this software blissfully incompetent, brazenly reckless or have they embraced a covenant that is unwholsomely against the mainstream of democracy? I can't accept any of the above as true. So, what's going on? Are these machines (or the process that manufactures them) "broken by design", and if so, why?

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