×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Mathematicians Use Mossberg 500 Pump-Action Shotgun To Calculate Pi

ClickOnThis Or just ask Chuck Norris? (303 comments)

He has recited pi to the last decimal digit. Twice.

He doesn't even need a Mossberg 500. He just tells a circle to fucking square itself.

2 days ago
top

Mathematicians Use Mossberg 500 Pump-Action Shotgun To Calculate Pi

ClickOnThis Sigh... (303 comments)

What will people not do to get an IgNobel Prize?

2 days ago
top

Study Rules Out Global Warming Being a Natural Fluctuation With 99% Certainty

ClickOnThis Re:more pseudo science (835 comments)

No, the original statement is a fabrication so the conclusion is a non-sequitur.

The original statement from rubycodez was as follows:

we cannot ascertain the temperatures of past centuries with enough precision to make any such study nor claims

That's not a fabrication. That's just wrong. Calling it a fabrication bestows too much grace on it.

Sadly, the anti-science (and particularly anti-AGW) crowd has no shortage of wrong statements, because unlike scientists, they are not tethered to facts.

We may not have direct records but that's not what the paper presents. Science is not always able to have first-hand accounts, but only indirect data sources, and yet we rely on it for a shocking amount of findings. Will you start dismissing those as well because they don't suit your agenda? Because an agenda it must be, for you to make such unreasonable demands and yet draw unrelated conclusions from them, while trusting other science based on similar methods.

This. Claiming that indirect evidence does not count is a desperate, sophomoric attempt by the anti-science crowd.

Recall the recent debate between Bill Nye and Ken Ham on the theory of evolution. One of Ken Ham's favourite strategies was an attempt to make a distiction between "observational" science and "historical" science, with the latter being invalid in his opinion. How often did we hear him say "you don't know, you weren't there" in response to indirect evidence?

What if, after the debate, Ken Ham had walked to the parking lot of his museum and discovered that the driver-side front fender of his car was damaged, with debris from his front driver-side headlight strewn on the ground? He would no doubt conclude that someone hit his car while he was parked there. But not so fast, Mr. Ham. Let's apply your own standards of evidence: You don't know. You weren't there.

3 days ago
top

Navy Debuts New Railgun That Launches Shells at Mach 7

ClickOnThis Re:IANA Physicist, So... (630 comments)

(IAalsoAP) I'd think the EMP can be reasonably mitigated with a timely chaff release, or similar shielding ideas.

A Faraday Cage built around the rail-gun might help with shielding. I'm not sure how chaff would help in that regard, unless the pieces of chaff are comparable to or larger than the majority of the wavelengths in the EMP's power-spectrum.

However, I'm wondering about the path of the projectile. The thing is hypersonic, the path will be superheated - that might ionize the air. And ionized air *will* show up on radar. You have a 200 mile trajectory pointing right back at the launch site. Don't worry if you miss a few miles here and there, or even if the launch site is beyond your horizon.

Excellent point. We've been bouncing radio waves off ionized gases (aka plasmas) since the time of Marconi.

4 days ago
top

Navy Debuts New Railgun That Launches Shells at Mach 7

ClickOnThis Re:IANA Physicist, So... (630 comments)

It's an inert piece of metal that can't be jammed and is probably hard to spot on radar too.

IAAP, although not an expert in rail guns or radar.

I would guess that the projectiles would be hard to detect on radar because they're small. However, it would seem to me that the rail gun itself would send out one hell of a large EMP that would reveal the location of the gun and the time of firing.

about a week ago
top

Navy Debuts New Railgun That Launches Shells at Mach 7

ClickOnThis Re:IANA Physicist, So... (630 comments)

Oxygen+Heat-> ??? -> Profit!

FTFY.

[And yes, you're right. Oxygen doesn't burn; other stuff burns by combining with it.]

about a week ago
top

Navy Debuts New Railgun That Launches Shells at Mach 7

ClickOnThis Re:IANA Physicist, So... (630 comments)

Not exactly. Oxygen is a prerequisite for the process known as combustion, since combustion is an oxidization reaction. "A rapid, exothermic oxidation of a substance, called the fuel," is a reasonable definition of combustion. Usually we say the fuel is combustible.

Mod parent informative. Oxygen doesn't burn. Rather, other stuff burns by combining rapidly with oxygen.

about a week ago
top

It's Time To Bring Pseudoscience Into the Science Classroom

ClickOnThis No, they don't (469 comments)

I confess I have conflicting opinions about Penn and Teller (just as they have conflicting opinions about many things.) And I have no desire to defend their libertarian views.

However, it is clear that Pen and Teller do not support pseudoscience. In fact, they go out of their way to debunk it. This is even mentioned in the very wikipedia link you supply.

I assume you are trying to claim that libertarianism itself is a kind of pseudoscience. I'm not a libertarian, but even I must disagree with that. It is a philosophy.

about two weeks ago
top

It's Time To Bring Pseudoscience Into the Science Classroom

ClickOnThis Re:The curious incident of the dog in the night-ti (469 comments)

Eventhe links you present disagree with you and agree with me.

Anyone who reads those links can see that Tenebrousedge is right and you are not.

about two weeks ago
top

It's Time To Bring Pseudoscience Into the Science Classroom

ClickOnThis Re:Unfalsifieable (469 comments)

Ah yes. You're right in pointing that out. Yes, we need to allow for the subjective and many areas of human experience are in fields where truth doesn't matter - art, literature, music - who cares if a moving song is true or just a story?

I wouldn't go so far as to say that truth "doesn't matter" in those fields. Rather, they pursue truth through different forms of expression, kind of in the sense of Plato's forms. There's "truth" in a Picasso painting, a Frost poem or a Beethoven piano sonata. It's just not the kind of objective, rational truth that science pursues.

The pseudo-sciences, however, don't peddle in those areas. Astrology doesn't claim to tell a nice story, it claims to be able to say something about your character and future events.

This, exactly. And I'd go further: in general, adherents to pseudo-science are either deceived about the truth, or have bought into the deception despite the refutation of pseudo-scientific claims. Art, on the other hand, doesn't try to "claim" anything about the truth, it just endeavors to express examples of it.

about two weeks ago
top

It's Time To Bring Pseudoscience Into the Science Classroom

ClickOnThis Re:needs some (469 comments)

Really if you want to see pseudoscience in action take a good look at all the assumptions behind cosmology and astronomy. Redshift = distance is an ASSUMPTION and Edwin Hubble himself was the first to point that out.

No, it is not an assumption. Hubble (and others) confirmed it by comparing redshifts with distances measured independently.

about two weeks ago
top

Tesla Model S Has Hidden Ethernet Port, User Runs Firefox On the 17" Screen

ClickOnThis Re:Why Ubuntu?! (208 comments)

Got 4 of them here. BIAMP DSP's all come with a nice crossover.

Most of us route the packets to our computer. Why do you listen to them on your hi-fi system?

about two weeks ago
top

Tesla Model S Has Hidden Ethernet Port, User Runs Firefox On the 17" Screen

ClickOnThis Re:Should void warranty (208 comments)

I wonder if you can overclock it.

I just had a mental image of a pimped-out Tesla with massive heatsink fins sticking out of the hood. Brings the concept of a "hot rod" to a whole new level...

about two weeks ago
top

Tesla Model S Has Hidden Ethernet Port, User Runs Firefox On the 17" Screen

ClickOnThis Re:While driving? (208 comments)

totally separate

We have a word for that. It's "separate."

Yes! Thank you! Redundant superlatives are a bugaboo of mine too. Our struggle against them never ends.

It's a shame. People like us are really unique.

Wait...

about two weeks ago
top

Tesla Model S Has Hidden Ethernet Port, User Runs Firefox On the 17" Screen

ClickOnThis Re:SkyNet is here (208 comments)

The Teslas will be the front-line soldiers when skynet finally awakes and claims its birth-right.

You just gave me a whole new perspective on self-driving cars. *shudder*

about two weeks ago
top

Tesla Model S Has Hidden Ethernet Port, User Runs Firefox On the 17" Screen

ClickOnThis Re:Why Ubuntu?! (208 comments)

I want to know how he matched up the pins and the baud rate.

Grandpa ... I told you not to post to /. until after you took your metamucil.

JK :-P

about two weeks ago
top

More Than 1 In 4 Car Crashes Involve Cellphone Use

ClickOnThis Re:It's the conversation, (367 comments)

I call BS on that, or having passengers talking to you cause accidents.

According to studies, passengers can observe when it is safe to talk and therefore conversations with them are less of a risk than conversations on a cell phone.

Ham radio operators talk on the radio all the time and dont have accidents at that rate, Semi truck drivers use a CB heavily and also dont.

I don't think you're interpreting the results correctly. Of all the accidents Ham radio operators or truck-drivers get into, what percentage involve their radio(s)? That's the question.

about three weeks ago
top

Homeopathic Remedies Recalled For Containing Real Medicine

ClickOnThis Re:I'm just curious (173 comments)

What's the homeopathic cure for dehydration?

Probably a dilute form of something that causes dehydration. Take your pick what that is, dilute it a lot, and then drink it. Voila, cure for dehydration. Homeopathy works! [Not.]

about three weeks ago
top

Homeopathic Remedies Recalled For Containing Real Medicine

ClickOnThis Re:Sarcasm (173 comments)

I though the idea of homeopathic water was to dilute the percieved cause* of the ailment. Should diluting a helpful ingredient be considered harmful then?

Quite so, which is why diluted vitamin C will eventually kill you.

Only if it's diluted in enough water to drown you.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

top

Giving a voice to ALS patients

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  about 1 month ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "We are all familiar with the speech synthesizer used by Stephen Hawking, famous physicist and ALS patient. He has heard the synthesizer's accent described as Scandinavian, American or Scottish although he has learned to identify with it. But what if an ALS patient could speak with her/his own voice? Former helicopter mechanic and now ALS patient Cal Moore can do just that. Moore, with the help of speech pathologist Roberta Kelley at Seattle's Virginia Mason Hospital, began recording his own voice years ago, before the disease began to affect his speech. He can play back, in his own voice, phrases such as "I feel tired", "You know what? Your driving sucks" and others. The process, known as voice-banking, was invented by speech pathologist John Costello at Boston Children's Hospital. Granted, it's not exactly a synthesizer, and obviously it requires sampling of the patient's unaffected voice in advance. But couldn't this be a precursor to other technologies that could synthesize arbitrary phrases in a patient's own voice, from pre-sampled phonemes?"
top

Programmer Outsources His Own Job to China

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  about a year ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "A USA-based programmer with Verizon oursourced his own job to a third-party contractor in Shenyang, China. He got away with the ruse for months until Verizon became suspicious of the traffic on his home-office VPN, and noticed that his in-office activities were perfunctory. From the article: "[T]he employee — identified only as “Bob” — used his 9-to-5 hours to peruse Reddit, watch cat videos, update his Facebook profile and shop on eBay." He paid the contractor $50,000 of his six-figure salary annually, and pocketed the difference. What is particularly irksome is that many blog posts on the Verizon website are praising him for his "business savvy.""
top

Laser Technology May Reduce Military Friendly-Fire

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  about a year and a half ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "CNN has a story on the use of laser-based identification technologies to reduce friendly-fire incidents. From the article: 'The DCID-TALON works when its user spots a target in his or her scope. The shooter aims the device, which sends an encoded message by laser beam. If the target is friendly, the message will reflect off of the target’s retroreflectors (they are the size of a postage stamp and can be embedded in the soldier’s helmet and uniform; each soldier would be outfitted with multiple retroreflectors), and the device will display the word "friend."'"
top

Nokia: Linux Needs to Learn Business

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  more than 5 years ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "BusinessWeek.com has an article on a speech given by Dr. Ari Jaaksi, VP of Nokia, at the Handset World conference. He claimed open-source software developers need to be "educated" on how the mobile industry works, particularly on the "business rules" that they need to obey, which include embracing "DRM, IPR [intellectual property rights], SIM locks and subsidised business models." From the article: "Why do we need closed vehicles? We do," he said. "Some of these things harm the industry but they're here [as things stand]. These are touchy, emotional issues but this dialogue is very much needed. As an industry, we plan to use open-source technologies but we are not yet ready to play by the rules; but this needs to work the other way round too." There is also some discussion about Maemo, the Linux OS that runs on Nokia's N800-series tablets, as well as Nokia's recent acquisition of Trolltech (makers of the Qt widget kit) and possible consequences for the mobile application market."
top

Donald Trump's "Celebrity Apprentice" [rev

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  more than 5 years ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "[a few corrections and additions...]

Candidates I'd like to see on Donald Trump's "Celebrity Apprentice"

OJ Simpson
Jenna Jameson
Richard Stallman
Kevin Mitnick
Alberto Gonzales
Uwe Boll
Hello Kitty Robo
The "Duke Nukem Forever" development team
A Beowulf cluster of Cowboy Neals"
top

Donald Trump's "Celebrity Apprentice"

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  more than 5 years ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "People I'd like to see on Donald Trump's "Celebrity Apprentice"

OJ Simpson
Jenna Jameson
Richard Stallman
Alberto Gonzales
Uwe Boll
Hello Kitty Robo
The "Duke Nukem Forever" development team
A Beowulf cluster of Cowboy Neals"
top

FCC opens door for US media consolidation

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  more than 6 years ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "The Guardian has a story about Tuesday's 3-2 vote by the FCC in the USA to relax significantly the media ownership rules set in 1975. These rules were put in place to prevent a single individual or company from controlling too many sources of information in a city. Critics are understandably concerned with the effects of such consolidation on minority businesses and the public interest, not to mention the suppression of dissenting viewpoints. Of particular concern is the Commission's decision to have a short 30-day period for public comment, instead of the usual 90 days. From the article: '"The agency has treated the public like children allowed to visit the cockpit on an airliner," Democratic commissioner Michael Copps said, "not allowed to fly the plane but allowed a brief false moment to believe they are".' Curiously, the story has had no discernable coverage in the US media. One wonders why..."
top

OpenOffice 2.3 released

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  more than 6 years ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "Surely I'm not the only one who noticed that OpenOffice.org has announced the release of version 2.3. From the website: "Available for download now, OpenOffice.org 2.3 incorporates an extensive array of new features and enhancements to all its core components, and protects users from newly discovered security vulnerabilities. It is a major release and all users should download it. Plus: It is only with 2.3 that users can make full use of our growing extensions library." You can download it but be kind and use a P2P client instead, such as bittorrent."
top

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "CNN reports that the space shuttle Discovery will be launched on December 6, in part to avoid concerns about operating the shuttle through midnight on New Year's Eve. From the article: The worry is that shuttle computers aren't designed to make the change from the 365th day of the old year to the first day of the new year while in flight. NASA has never had a shuttle in space December 31 or January 1. "We've just never had the computers up and going when we've transitioned from one year to another," said Discovery astronaut Joan Higginbotham. "We're not really sure how they're going to operate." The article goes on to explain that the decision was simply one of prudence, because the shuttle hasn't been certified to fly in that time period."
top

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  more than 7 years ago

ClickOnThis (137803) writes "CNN reports that Intel and the University of California, Santa Barbara have announced the development of a hybrid silicon laser that could lead to dramatic improvements in the speed and cost of computer systems and data networks. From the article: "The development makes it possible to use laser light rather than wires to send data between chips, addressing one of the major hurdles in advancing the use of so-called "silicon photonics" in computers and data centers". The press release on the Intel website has additional details."

Journals

top

ClickOnThis ClickOnThis writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Electronic voting machines have been an incendiary topic on Slashdot for a very long time, and for good reason. Software errors, cheesy hardware, political patronage to put them in place, strong-arm tactics by the manufacturers to cover up flaws, not to mention the impossibility of verifying results...there's not much to like. And it seems that any technically-minded person is (rightly) well aware of the vulnerabilities of e-voting, and is unequivocally in favor of a paper trail to verify voter intent.

Obviously I come to bury e-voting, not to praise it. But there is something that continues to trouble me as very strange: the consistent reports of unreliability in the software that runs these machines. How can it be that difficult to write software that simply counts votes? It seems like a straightforward exercise in software engineering. Yet the problems with voting machines appear to be far out of proportion to their inherent technical simplicity.

Only for the sake of argument, let's ask: are the programmers that write this software blissfully incompetent, brazenly reckless or have they embraced a covenant that is unwholsomely against the mainstream of democracy? I can't accept any of the above as true. So, what's going on? Are these machines (or the process that manufactures them) "broken by design", and if so, why?

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...