×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

How To Make PC Gaming Better

Coriolis Re:I had given up trying to school you guys. (337 comments)

Well done sir, you neatly dodged answering his criticism by indulging in condescending sophistry. As despairing of your myopia as I am, I cannot help but be impressed by the depth of your cognitive dissonance.

about 2 years ago
top

27 Reported Killed In Connecticut Elementary School Shooting

Coriolis Re:And yet... (2987 comments)

Ok. Which is easier to fix?

about 2 years ago
top

Python Creator Guido van Rossum Leaves Google For Dropbox

Coriolis Re:Web hosting providers slow to offer new PHP (261 comments)

Which looks a little like how Python would look without list comprehensions:

filtered = filter((lambda x: x.foo == "bar"), unfiltered)

True, but my brain just auto-converted that to a car analogy: "You know, if I take off one of the wheels off this fancy sports car, it doesn't drive too good" :)

about 2 years ago
top

Python Creator Guido van Rossum Leaves Google For Dropbox

Coriolis Re:Only two warts (261 comments)

No, it uses white space for block structure only, and honestly, don't knock it until you've tried it. Most people working with C-derived languages use some form of block indentation, and large shops usually have coding standards that insist you stick to it rigorously. This means most people already have the tooling in place to enforce indentation, so it's not like it'd be any extra effort to do it for Python. I'm in no way suggesting you'd find it to be a revelatory experience, but I think you would find that when it comes to writing code, it doesn't make things any harder, it in fact makes things slightly easier. But the difference is so small that it's practically irrelevant. I used to think the same way as you, that it was the dumbest idea I'd ever heard of. Then I tried it and realised I couldn't care less :D

about 2 years ago
top

No More "Asperger's Syndrome"

Coriolis Re:Damn... (602 comments)

I'm just going to jump in here and yell "BULLSHIT!". Ever looked up the definition of normal? Aspergers is a significant deviation from how a person functions mentally on average.

I'm going to go out on a limb here, and guess that you don't actually have a statistical definition of normal human mental processes to hand, so trying to use formal definitions of "normal" and "significance" is meaningless.

What a nice load of pathos. All irrelevant to the topic.

No. I'm pointing out that humans have a cognitive defect that causes us to label inconvenient mental configurations as "diseases", rather than addressing the important questions directly. Is this person happy? Can they achieve their goals without assistance? Can they effectively function in our society as it currently exists?

about 2 years ago
top

No More "Asperger's Syndrome"

Coriolis Re:Damn... (602 comments)

Diseases of the brain sometimes nothing but semantics. When you declare something as being a disease, you are implicitly saying it's not normal, it's disadvantageous and it's something that we should seek to cure. But it's culturally-defined what is and isn't normal. There are situations where being a sociopath are an advantage. There are (controversial) theories that suggest that schizophrenics were treated as shaman in hunter-gatherer societies. And obviously, we can't forget the DSM's classification of homosexuality as a disease. As you point out, things we regard as genetic diseases sometimes confer benefits, which why they haven't been selected out of the gene pool. Evolution doesn't draw this line between normal and diseased, but we insist on trying to do so, which is why the DSM skitters about like water on a frying pan - all it's doing is tracking cultural norms and current obsessions. Personally, I think we should do the opposite of what you're suggesting: abandon the word "disease" for all mental differences. Stop trying to draw artificial distinctions. Stop trying to pigeonhole. Approach each one - and each person - as an individual.

about 2 years ago
top

Inside an Amazon Warehouse

Coriolis Re:Humans? (206 comments)

Or you could actually read the article that link points to and discover that your prejudices are incorrect. Educated people end up in these jobs too.

about 2 years ago
top

The IDE As a Bad Programming Language Enabler

Coriolis Re:Word (586 comments)

That is not the only thing that "yield" is for; it can be used to perform just-in-time execution of memory- or CPU-intensive operations, but it can also be used to make composable chains of list iterators that only process as much of the list as they need to satisfy the caller's requirements. Microsoft's own guidance explicitly states that properties should avoid side effects. Anyone dumb enough to code like that is not smart enough to think of using "yield", or to use it correctly.

more than 2 years ago
top

Apple CEO Likens Surface To Car That Flies, Floats

Coriolis Re:Ghandi Time... (377 comments)

Of course, people also laugh at things that are laughable, and they don't end up winning.

more than 2 years ago
top

Now That It's Here, Is There a Place For Windows RT?

Coriolis Re:It's too bad tablets are pretty much useless. (287 comments)

I look at the average person and think, now here is a guy with more money than sense. Yeah nice to have some overpriced gadget to sit between a more expensive gadget that can actually do stuff, and time spent actually enjoying life and not surfing the web and writing emails. Most people with less or no money to waste have no choice but to do the correct thing in down time and enjoy life and not surf the web and write emails.

...or post to /.? Your signature is apposite.

more than 2 years ago
top

Mysterious Algorithm Was 4% of Trading Activity Last Week

Coriolis Re:Truth or dare... (617 comments)

Uhuh. Of course, it's still disputed whether that role was positive or negative. Personally, I'd be more tempted to lay most of the blame on the 4 billion USD's worth of E-mini contracts dumped onto the market by an exceptionally dumb trading algorithm. The more I learn about traders, the more horrified I become that we apparently have so many people writing trading bots with, it seems, almost no understanding of economics. They understand the layered, arcane rules of the game they play on the stock exchange, but seem to have no particular deep understanding of what's actually happening.

more than 2 years ago
top

Mysterious Algorithm Was 4% of Trading Activity Last Week

Coriolis Re:Truth or dare... (617 comments)

Yes. The simplest long position is one you hold in a cash account. Trading on margin is for those who do it for a living or who alternatively have lots of spare time to watch the market.

more than 2 years ago
top

Leave Your Cellphone At Home, Says Jacob Appelbaum

Coriolis Re:Leave you phone^W lojack at home. (306 comments)

It's not like hard lines are secure. The FBI can tap your calls from their desks. With a warrant, obviously, cough cough. How much do you wish to inconvenience yourself to protect yourself from theoretical monitoring? How many technologies are you going to allow your fear to block you from using? People use these phones willingly because they find value in them. If you don't use something you desire because you're afraid of what your government would do to you, then aren't you oppressed? Aren't you actually allowing them to oppress you, complicit in your own subjugation?

more than 2 years ago
top

Ask Slashdot: Is the Rise of Skeuomorphic User Interfaces a Problem?

Coriolis Re:Hint for future "Ask Slashdot" articles (311 comments)

The problem is that GUI and SUI are not synonymous, which should be obvious if you read the supplied link. Which i sense you didn't. It was the correct term. An equivalent term would've been "GUIs which mimic the attributes of analogous physical objects", which is unwieldy.

more than 2 years ago
top

Genetically Engineering Babies a Moral Obligation, Says Ethicist

Coriolis Re:The question is (840 comments)

I was imprecise, I apologise. I think, from other comments, you're from a farming family? So I don't mean a poor harvest, I mean loss of your entire crop. And it happening over and over again, because the crop is especially vulnerable.

Extending the pet analogy, yes I take your point about congenital defects, but what would you think of someone who deliberately or carelessly (as in, being capable of knowing better) bred those defects into their children?

more than 2 years ago
top

Genetically Engineering Babies a Moral Obligation, Says Ethicist

Coriolis Re:The question is (840 comments)

The banana hasn't actually been as successful as it could be, because of its vulnerability to disease. And that vulnerability has put the livelihood of banana growers at risk. Most of them are on lower incomes (globally speaking), so one bad harvest can be catastrophic. Random catastrophic shocks to economies leads to social instability.

As for dogs, I'm taking it from your comment that you don't assign any negative value to the suffering of non-humans. Fair enough. I do, which is why I refer to it as a cost, and as something to be avoided in future.

more than 2 years ago
top

Genetically Engineering Babies a Moral Obligation, Says Ethicist

Coriolis Re:The question is (840 comments)

Um. Saying that one should go into genetic modification with ones eyes open, prepared for unexpected consequences, learning from the mistakes we've already made? That's silly?

The problem here is that people seem to think I'm against genetic modification, which is something I never said. In fact, you'll notice I claimed genetic engineering is "capable of wonders", so I'm a little perplexed how people are getting such negative vibes from my comment. I'm just saying, picking the banana and the dog shows stunning ignorance and hubris, as those are two cases where we've made huge and costly mistakes. Why not use something like Golden Rice as an example? That said, I think there are valid concerns about Golden Rice becoming a victim of its own success, leading to a loss of biodiversity. But's that's where should learn our lessons from the banana, and take steps to prevent it.

more than 2 years ago
top

Genetically Engineering Babies a Moral Obligation, Says Ethicist

Coriolis Re:No, just no. (840 comments)

As long as, of course, we also knew what—if any— beneficial effects those genes had and had plans to compensate for their loss.

more than 2 years ago
top

Genetically Engineering Babies a Moral Obligation, Says Ethicist

Coriolis Re:The question is (840 comments)

You mean the Cavendish banana, that repeatedly comes under fungal and viral attack, that it can't defend itself from due to its lack of genetic diversity? Or the relentlessly inbred pedigree breeds that have defects in their breathing, walking or vision? Genetic engineering is and will be capable of wonders, but we shouldn't blind ourselves to the dangers.

more than 2 years ago
top

Paul Ryan's Record On Science and Government

Coriolis Re:Something more recent and positive? (543 comments)

I hate to be crude, but to an outside observer, it appears you've both got your heads up your respective arses. It's like watching an acrimonious divorce. "Go on then, take your car, but you'll better get it out of my garage!" You know there's no happy ending there, both parties are going to bleed.

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

Coriolis hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

Coriolis has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?