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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

Cramer Re:My opinion on the matter. (753 comments)

SysVinit doesn't have any way to restart services

Yes it does, and it always has. The problem is init didn't start cron. cron was started by a shell script that was started by a shell script that was a one-shot by init. If cron were a "respawn" task in the inittab, it would, indeed, restart it if it exited. (and disable it if it respawned too often.)

yesterday
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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

Cramer Re:My opinion on the matter. (753 comments)

You could not be more wrong. While ntpd may not be installed by default, it's purpose is very much time synchronization with one or more servers, very rarely is it installed as a time source. I have it installed on hundreds of machines, only two of them are servers.

yesterday
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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

Cramer Re:My opinion on the matter. (753 comments)

Scope? You've got to be smoking some good shit. As an init system, it's job is to start and stop (and monitor) applications/subsystems. NOT be those subsystems. Start syslog, not replace it. Start login, not replace it. Start ntp, not replace it.

SMF doesn't try to be anything else. And it doesn't 100% eliminate shell scripts -- though they aren't in /etc.

yesterday
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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

Cramer Re:My opinion on the matter. (753 comments)

If I need SNTP support (or full NTP), I'll f'ing install software to handle it. I don't need my damned init system to carry that spare tire with it.

yesterday
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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

Cramer Re:My opinion on the matter. (753 comments)

The real question is why didn't it stop. Of course, anyone looking at the code should've seen the obvious possible infinite loop.

yesterday
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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

Cramer Re:My opinion on the matter. (753 comments)

Right. And systemd is going to make every distro in the universe use the exact same tools, in the exact same places, with the exact same filesystem layout, and the exact same configuration methods/languages/etc. HAH! No, major distros will continue to have their own ideas of how things should be done, and systemd will never stop that. The very minute systemd attempts to assert such control it will be dead. (it's a**hole creator will have long abandoned by then.)

yesterday
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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

Cramer Re:My opinion on the matter. (753 comments)

If we can find a better way to do it, let's do it.

systemd is hands down, NOT a better way. It's a complicated, overgrown, bloated replacement for numerous systems that were not complicated, did exactly and only what they should, and did so efficiently with fairly simple, time tested code.

yesterday
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The IPv4 Internet Hiccups

Cramer Re:Betteridge (248 comments)

IPv6 currently has fewer prefixes, but that won't always be the case, and it uses the same TCAM space as everything else. Giving IPv4 a little more space means taking it from something else -- by default that's IPv6 space.

about two weeks ago
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The IPv4 Internet Hiccups

Cramer Re:Betteridge (248 comments)

ABSOLUTELY FUCKING WRONG IPv6 addresses are 128bits with a 128bit mask. Every bit counts.

You have fallen to a classic blunder. Just because that bullshit SLAAC requires a 64bit prefix does NOT mean the whole damned world is 64+64. This idiot-assumption makes your entire product line completely useless; you have now bankrupt your company.

about two weeks ago
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Study: Firmware Plagued By Poor Encryption and Backdoors

Cramer Re:Not the same certificate on every device (141 comments)

RTFA. They downloaded the installable firmware images for many devices and found a self-signed certificate in some of them. That is not a per-device-unique anything. Every device loads the same blob, and has the same certificate. They aren't even competent enough to get the device to generate it's own certificate. (which could have it's own issues, but at least it has a chance of being different from any other device.)

about two weeks ago
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Study: Firmware Plagued By Poor Encryption and Backdoors

Cramer Re:Self signed-certificate?? (141 comments)

The issue is that it's embedded in the firmware, which means it's the same damned certificate on every device. Hack it once, and every one of them is now hacked. (remember the issue with debian and sshd keys? there were only a handful of keys because they were generated with a guessable random number (seconds from boot) on the first boot.)

about two weeks ago
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Study: Firmware Plagued By Poor Encryption and Backdoors

Cramer Re:Of course (141 comments)

Right, because bugs in the cannot-be-replaced version 1.0 firmware will never come back to haunt you. (read: force it to fallback to 1.0, and bob's your uncle.)

about two weeks ago
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Facebook Seeks Devs To Make Linux Network Stack As Good As FreeBSD's

Cramer Re:FreeBSD network stack (195 comments)

And the absence of any pesky gotta-show-you-the-code GPL cruft has nothing to do with it.

about three weeks ago
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Facebook Seeks Devs To Make Linux Network Stack As Good As FreeBSD's

Cramer Re:Won't Happen (195 comments)

There are a few "hacks" that do that in linux as well. Basically the network driver is in userland, with a kernel shim to handle DMA and IRQ which isn't available to userland. (in fact, I use that same mode to deal with broadcom SoC's -- not for network traffic, just to configure and monitor) There are advantages to pulling packets direct to userland.

about three weeks ago
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Hack an Oscilloscope, Get a DMCA Take-Down Notice From Tektronix

Cramer Re:Tek smeck (273 comments)

Right, because they all put $100k worth of tech in a scope for $4k, and get the rest of it when you pay to use that tech. The hardware costs what it costs; if they can afford to put dormant hardware in the thing, then they're just screwing over their customers. It's like a lot of networking vendors being dicks by including a 10G interface put only allowing to link at 100M unless you pay them $$$$$. Or a fiber channel switch with 32 ports, but only 8 enabled in software.

about three weeks ago
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Hack an Oscilloscope, Get a DMCA Take-Down Notice From Tektronix

Cramer Re:Wayback Machine (273 comments)

Of course, you have to know exactly where in the eeprom to put the SKU's. (which wouldn't take long to figure out, btw.)

about three weeks ago
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Barry Shein Founded the First Dialup ISP (Video)

Cramer Re:Uh... (116 comments)

Indeed. Somewhere circa 1997(?) -- It was a dark day for the internet: people too stupid to be on the internet were now pooping all over it.

about three weeks ago
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Robotic Suit Gives Shipyard Workers Super Strength

Cramer Re:The grip (125 comments)

Did you look at the picture? A magnet is what's holding the "heavy" plate. The worker's hands are merely guides; they aren't supporting the weight at all. (assuming it was balanced when it was lifted.)

about three weeks ago

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