Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

Debian's Systemd Adoption Inspires Threat of Fork

Culture20 Re:What? (373 comments)

Ego.

9 hours ago
top

Debian's Systemd Adoption Inspires Threat of Fork

Culture20 Re:What? (373 comments)

>IBM still obtains boku bucks

The word you're looking for is "beaucoup." You seem super-high.

Might have been trying to say "goku". That would make GP super-saiyan.

9 hours ago
top

Debian's Systemd Adoption Inspires Threat of Fork

Culture20 Re:UNIX Philosophy (373 comments)

I'm a web programmer who loves Linux,

Welcome.

but the kernal and start-up are still black magic to me.

SysV init is really quite simple. Just a few minutes playing around with it on a system and you'll get the hang of it. First off, there are several run-levels. Let's focus on just one run-level for now since most people only ever edit one (they'll use run-level 0: shutdown, and run-level 6: reboot, unknowingly). Within each runlevel directory (let's choose /etc/rc5.d/) are symlinks that point to the scripts in /etc/init.d/, and these symlinks are named with S for start or K for kill, followed by a number for the order they should be executed in, followed by the script name (for readability's sake; it doesn't need anything beyond the S/K##). When starting or ending a run-level (booting/shutting-down), init goes through the simlinks in order and runs the init scripts they point to with either "start" or "stop" as parameters. The scripts handle the peculiarities of the various daemons, and act as an easily configurable startup mechanism that allows the sysadmin to fine-tune things. For example, if a server's system clock fails, ntpd will refuse to update because the clock-skew is too great ("2014!? But it's currently 2002 according to the system clock."). So, a sysadmin can write a little hack for ntpdate at the beginning of the "start" function in ntpd's init script. Mind you, this is a poor example, but easier to explain than any I could come up with quickly.

Maybe an init system can be simple. I don't understand why even shell scripts are needed. Seems like they should be the exception, not the rule.

Editing init scripts is the exception, but because it happens enough times, the scripts should exist as a rule. Scripts allow for high-configurability while keeping some level of separation. The things ntpd does on startup could be parameters, and even the above ntpdate functionality (which is considered bad form in the ntp world: trusting the network time too greatly) could be compiled into the ntp daemon. But who wants to include every hack every sysadmin comes up with for their own environments in the main codebase for ntpd? And who amongst all the sysadmins wants to recompile ntpd for every change and essentially maintain their own fork? Not to mention the differences between distributions for configuration file locations, log files, etc. It's much easier to use scripts as that happy medium where sysadmins can edit without need for constant recompiles.

Why not one big super-script then...

Seems like configuration should be a single file that lists the programs to start from top to bottom

...this violates the separation principle. And would be slightly annoying too. It's easier to handle the individual scripts for their respective daemons than it is to isolate the section that is needed, and as pointed out before, a mere list of executable paths isn't enough, even with parameters; not configurable enough. Let's say you make a change on server 1's init script for ntpd. Now you want to copy that configuration to all 10,000 servers you have. Easy-peasy for a specialized init-script (assuming they're all the same distro and version): just copy the file to every machine and restart ntpd. But with a monolithic script, if you copy it to every machine, you'll be copying entries for daemons that the other servers might not have, or worse: removing entries for vital daemons on the target servers. Keeping them separate is best. Just as keeping them highly configurable is best.

11 hours ago
top

The Physics of Why Cold Fusion Isn't Real

Culture20 Re:Are liquid-nitrogen superconductors relevant? (342 comments)

We know how to induce fusion via a multitude of methods. The thing is, none of them are net positive in energy production. None. Of. Them.

H-bombs are fairly net positive. Slightly uncontrolled, but it's a start.

3 days ago
top

Warner Brothers Announces 10 New DC Comics Movies

Culture20 Re:Not just Aquaman (186 comments)

That has been Marvel's secret since they first started. Marvel has always been about the human side of the masks.

3 days ago
top

Warner Brothers Announces 10 New DC Comics Movies

Culture20 Re:Not just Aquaman (186 comments)

Yes. DCAU, along with Jeffrey Combs, took the Question and made him into a star.

And created Harley Quinn from whole cloth.

4 days ago
top

Warner Brothers Announces 10 New DC Comics Movies

Culture20 I saw the Shazam movie already (186 comments)

Who knew Shaquille Oneal could act? The only thing I don't get was he also played Steel.

4 days ago
top

Court Rules Parents May Be Liable For What Their Kids Post On Facebook

Culture20 Re:Why not? When you have kids.. (319 comments)

The internet isn't some zone that is free from libel and slander laws just because "it's on a computer."

4 days ago
top

Warner Brothers Announces 10 New DC Comics Movies

Culture20 Re:Not just Aquaman (186 comments)

They could just take all of their DC Animated Universe stories and convert them to live action. The writers for the DCAU seem to know how to grab a comic book audience. The DC live action movie writers don't want to make a fun comic book movie. They want to make a work of art based on a comic book series.

4 days ago
top

FBI Warns Industry of Chinese Cyber Campaign

Culture20 Re:It's time to start a trade war. (105 comments)

My gradnfather fought in a real war. From what he told me, it was nothing like this.

Some great uncles of mine were on the beach at Normandy. One of them got a blueprint copied directly from his entire left leg. He survived, but only because a quick thinking medic was able to replace it with a pin-up from the landing craft. He still gets compliments on that leg.

4 days ago
top

How Nigeria Stopped Ebola

Culture20 Re:It only takes one ... (381 comments)

"Unlikely contagious" is an acceptable risk for a lesser disease, one that doesn't usually kill its host. But she and the CDC should have recognized that even a slight risk of spreading this thing is unacceptable. She should have quarantined herself.

4 days ago
top

How Nigeria Stopped Ebola

Culture20 Re: It only takes one ... (381 comments)

Even worse: she's a nurse. She felt there was a chance she might have Ebola, so much that she called the CDC. She didn't err on caution. Forget the CDC's (non)answer. She knew what she was doing was risky. Even if no one gets infected, she had better talk to a lawyer about all the "mental anguish" lawsuits she'll soon be subjected to.

4 days ago
top

Password Security: Why the Horse Battery Staple Is Not Correct

Culture20 Re:Negative (546 comments)

The first thing I learned about storing passwords is that you use a salted hash, which is impossible to decrypt back into plaintext. Am I missing something, or is this practice not standard practically everywhere now?

Apparently you are missing something because while common practice, it's not ubiquitous. And like all common practices, it gets spoken of less and less until new developers reinvent the wheel and decide they want passwords in plain text to make password recovery 'easier' ("click on the http link in your email and you'll see your password!")

about a week ago
top

Password Security: Why the Horse Battery Staple Is Not Correct

Culture20 Re:Oh great (546 comments)

Passphrases don't help the root problem, that "memorable" implies low-entropy.

Except that the human brain can separate out words as atomics rather than the parts that make up their whole. This makes remembering a string of a small number of truly random words easy to remember.
Demiurgic precompel Pediculicidal superimpersonally trichromate Voq
increep Sporodochium impassioning Winesburg Spicknel bacon-and-eggs
Are those really so impossible to remember? The biggest problem is when someone starts using sporodochium in casual conversation a lot, you know it's part of their new random passphrase or they started a word-of-the-day calendar.

about a week ago
top

How Spurious Wikipedia Edits Can Attach a Name To a Scandal, 35 Years On

Culture20 Re:Journalists have less time... (165 comments)

Minutes can matter to news networks these days, as its the difference between breaking it first or second.

Which is silly since the difference between first and last is thirty seconds at most. First used to mean something back when papers came out once a day. A full day's lead time on an important story means everyone buys your paper that day. Today, I'd rather pay attention to a news service that checks sources and gets the story right than one that "had it first".

about two weeks ago
top

Chimpanzee "Personhood" Is Back In Court

Culture20 Re:Does that mean they'll get to vote? (385 comments)

No, that's the beautiful part. When wintertime rolls around, the gorillas simply freeze to death.

about two weeks ago
top

Systemd Adding Its Own Console To Linux Systems

Culture20 Re:Because when something's not broken (763 comments)

You do realize that nobody runs servers on bare metal these days, right?

I'll grant you that print servers and web servers tend to be on VMs these days, but the VM host OS has to run on bare metal, and if you're doing number crunching or large data storage, it's going to be bare metal too, because the VM host/guest overhead is a waste of resources.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

top

Facebook forces your information to be public now

Culture20 Culture20 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Culture20 (968837) writes "I just hopped on FB, and went to change my status (yes, I was going to say what I ate for lunch). A popup appeared, saying it wanted to change all my information into links. Being a geek, I chose the "edit them individually" method since I didn't know if the links would be correct. Then I read the following text:

Confirm the Pages that will be on your profile
Uncheck any Page you don't want to link to. Linking to education and work Pages may also create additional Pages, such as for your major or job title. If you don't link to any Pages, these sections on your profile will be empty. By linking your profile to Pages, you will be making these connections public.

If you don't link to any Pages, these sections on your profile will be empty. By linking your profile to Pages, you will be making these connections public.

You are about to remove this information
If you don't link to any Pages, the following sections on your profile will be empty:
  • Work and Education
  • Current City
  • Hometown
  • Likes and Interests

They're empty now. Others have noticed this too."
Link to Original Source

top

MS IE out-of-band security bulliten; New Firefox

Culture20 Culture20 writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Culture20 (968837) writes "MS just published a security bulletin for the latest IE exploit(s):
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/Bulletin/MS08-078.mspx
There's also a webcast at 1PM PST.
http://msevents.microsoft.com/CUI/WebCastEventDetails.aspx?EventID=1032399448&EventCategory=4&culture=en-US&CountryCode=US

In other browser news, Mozilla just released Firefox 3.0.5 and 2.0.0.19 today. 2.0.0.19 is the last 2.x, and there will be no security updates. Upgrade to 3.0.5 and use an addon if you've been holding back for url-bar related reasons. Still no official MSI from Mozilla, so Windows admins, prepare your installations with care."

Link to Original Source

Journals

Culture20 has no journal entries.

Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?