×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Comments

top

OpenBSD Team Cleaning Up OpenSSL

DMUTPeregrine Re:Backport\Upstream? Seems unlikely (279 comments)

Their theory is that they need an SSL system for OpenBSD. They're not trying to build it for other platforms, and the extra code adds complexity (and can contain vulnerabilities) so they're not going to maintain it. They're cutting out unnecessary cruft. That cruft may be needed for some users, but OpenBSD doesn't have any use for OS/2 support.

yesterday
top

Theo De Raadt's Small Rant On OpenSSL

DMUTPeregrine Re:Hindsight is 20/20 (301 comments)

OpenSSL's code is a mess. Go, read it.

Now that you're back from your stay in the sanitarium, would you like to consider that rewriting it might be a better choice than auditing? Yes?

Let's just make sure Nyarlathotep isn't on the dev team this time...

about a week ago
top

Australia Declares Homeopathy Nonsense, Urges Doctors to Inform Patients

DMUTPeregrine Re:diminished placebo effect (408 comments)

No. Telling the patient they're receiving a placebo has been shown not to reduce the effect at all.

about a week ago
top

"Nearly Unbreakable" Encryption Scheme Inspired By Human Biology

DMUTPeregrine Re:Meh (179 comments)

Biometrics are great to replace usernames. They can be the same everywhere with no ill effects, if an attacker learns the data/username it's not a problem, they're public, etc. They're terrible at replacing passwords.

So of course they they get used to replace passwords.

about two weeks ago
top

"Nearly Unbreakable" Encryption Scheme Inspired By Human Biology

DMUTPeregrine Re:Nearly Unbreakable (179 comments)

Aaah, I see you've used Oracle.

about two weeks ago
top

Microsoft's Security Products Will Block Adware By Default Starting On July 1

DMUTPeregrine Re:adware is malware (177 comments)

Which is why the answer is not a hosts file, but a local (caching) DNS server. It also has the benefit of not slowing down DNS lookups when you get a massive table of blocked destinations.

about two weeks ago
top

An SSD for Your Current Computer May Save the Cost of a New One (Video)

DMUTPeregrine Re:Two drives not feasible for laptops (353 comments)

I use an SSD and an HDD for my desktop.
Of course, /home is on the HDD. For Windows you can do effectively the same thing with NTFS Junction points, so that C:\Users is on the HDD, not the SDD. Probably best to do the same with Program Files and such as well.

about two weeks ago
top

Ad Tracking: Is Anything Being Done?

DMUTPeregrine Re:solution (303 comments)

Self-destructing cookies is a good addon. (For Firefox.) It deletes cookies made by a tab when you close that tab, and can be set to save the cookies for each site as desired.

about two weeks ago
top

Why Darmok Is a Good Star Trek: TNG Episode

DMUTPeregrine Re:Can I vote for.. (512 comments)

Yes, but it also had "Far Beyond the Stars." That alone pulls the series average way up.

about two weeks ago
top

MIT Researchers Create Platform To Build Secure Web Apps That Never Leak Data

DMUTPeregrine Re:Seriously? RTFM (90 comments)

You don't even need XSS-like attacks. If you compromise the server you can re-write all the JS to send the encryption keys, the plaintext, or whatever you want to your server instead. Or back to the original server, and have it forward things on to you.

about three weeks ago
top

IPCC's "Darkest Yet" Climate Report Warns of Food, Water Shortages

DMUTPeregrine Re:We've gone beyond bad science (703 comments)

Answering a troll, but what the hell....

A) Probable, but not definite. It depends upon the scale and the speed. After all, we can always wipe ourselves out with a nuclear war before we wipe ourselves out with greenhouse gasses.
B) False, while that would help with the CO2 the immediate unrest caused would be a vastly greater harm to society than using a more reasonable plan. Doing nothing has the potential to cause much greater long-term harm, but an immediate shutdown of all coal plants would be like knocking out all your teeth to prevent cavities, instead of starting to use a toothbrush.
C) Almost certainly not.
D) Possibly, but it's impossible to tell at this point. Local effects like hurricanes shouldn't change much during the initial warming stages.
E) Almost certainly, though where that point is is unknown. If you managed to change the atmosphere of Earth to match that of Venus you'd get such an effect, and would get such an effect before you reached the Venusian composition. How far before is not fully known.
F) False. Increased atmospheric CO2 has already had noticeable effects with ocean acidification.
G) This statement is meaningless. Which mean?
H) False.

about three weeks ago
top

Fluke Donates Multimeters To SparkFun As Goodwill Gesture

DMUTPeregrine Re:Good PR Move (250 comments)

Yep. A big thing people don't get is safety. Have you ever had a cheap multimeter fuse blow and toss shards of glass through the case, avoiding your hand only because you weren't holding the meter there? I have. $100-$200 more for a meter with proper input protection, HRC fuses, a strong case, etc, is well worth the money. There is of course a lot more to Fluke meters' quality than just their input protection, they're ridiculously reliable (Dave Jones took a Fluke 87-V caving, swam with it, dropped it off a 15-meter bridge onto concrete repeatedly, and still didn't break it) and very accurate (for handhelds, good bench meters are of course better than handheld meters.) Fluke makes great equipment. Of course, the other top-end brands make similarly good equipment. Agilent meters are great, etc, etc.

about a month ago
top

Firefox 28 Arrives With VP9 Video Decoding, HTML5 Volume Controls

DMUTPeregrine Re:150 tabs? (142 comments)

I do not have a left-to-right order to my tabs. I have a hierarchical tree:
https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/tree-style-tab/

The relations between the tabs are important to me, bookmarks don't provide a good way to preserve the relational information.

Of course I could store it all in a SQL database and write scripts to manage opening and closing the pages with an HTML viewer or such, but that's far more effort than using the tools already available.

about a month ago
top

Firefox 28 Arrives With VP9 Video Decoding, HTML5 Volume Controls

DMUTPeregrine Re:150 tabs? (142 comments)

Folders don't quite work. Think of it as an outline Let's say I have tabs A, B, and C. Tab A has children 1 and 2, B has 3 and 4, and C has one child, 5. 1 has I and II and III, 2 has IV and VI, etc.
With folders, there's no way to preserve the links between levels easily, except perhaps naming the folders to match their corresponding tabs. With multiple tabs at one level, each of which has multiple subtabs it's hard to distinguish what came from where, it's just not well-suited to organizing things in this way. It's possible, but not worth the effort.

about a month ago
top

Firefox 28 Arrives With VP9 Video Decoding, HTML5 Volume Controls

DMUTPeregrine Re:VP9 (142 comments)

You have to enable HTML5. https://www.youtube.com/html5

about a month ago
top

Firefox 28 Arrives With VP9 Video Decoding, HTML5 Volume Controls

DMUTPeregrine Re:150 tabs? (142 comments)

I have tons of tabs open, because bookmarks suck. EG if I'm working on a project with a new framework I might need to reference 3-4 APIs, and 5 classes in each, and 2-3 methods per class in a given hour or two. I want a tab for each method, with a tree of the parent classes and APIs. Tree-Style tabs lets me have that, but Firefox's bookmarks don't. So I leave tabs open. That results in 50-60 tabs or so. Sure, I close the tab group when the project is done, and subsets when I'm done with them, and use different windows to separate different projects/activities, but it results in lots of tabs. "Normal" people use tabs for current pages, I like to have both the current pages and a herarchical history of how I got to those pages. I also open all links in tabs. Tab hierarchies provide a combined history (with list of what lead where,) bookmarks, and tabs, all in one convenient interface. If bookmarks supported this nicely it would be great, but they don't.

about a month ago
top

Java 8 Officially Released

DMUTPeregrine Re:A Javascript Engine in the JVM!? (302 comments)

Java and "Mocha Java" are both coffees, and both use beans from the island of Java, but are very different drinks. Java and Javascript are both programming languages, and both were originally created by Sun Microsystems, but they're very different languages.

about a month ago
top

Is Analog the Fix For Cyber Terrorism?

DMUTPeregrine Re:This is very, very old (245 comments)

That's because CS is math, not engineering. Computer Engineering is engineering, Computer Science is the study of the mathematics of computer systems. CE is a lot rarer than CS though, so a lot of people with CS degrees try to be engineers, but aren't trained for it.

about a month ago
top

Big Bang's Smoking Gun Found

DMUTPeregrine Re:Next up: a direct detection (269 comments)

Black holes are the brightest objects in the universe. As far as we know nothing escapes the event horizon, but plenty of things get thrown out at very high energy from the accretion disk.

about a month ago
top

Nanoscale Terahertz Optical Switch Breaks Miniaturization Barrier

DMUTPeregrine Re:Isolation, Reflection and Cross-talk (35 comments)

True, light can go through insulation if the opacity is too low, and at small scales the light tunneling across the barrier will become a problem. What you don't get is a direct equivalent to induction that happens in electrical systems, but all the other sources of interference still apply. It's still crosstalk, but not from the cause most often seen in the generally familiar electrical systems.

about a month ago

Submissions

DMUTPeregrine hasn't submitted any stories.

Journals

Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...