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Firefox Will Soon Offer One-Click Buttons For Your Search Engines

Dagger2 Re:So what? (101 comments)

Maybe if they'd actually take our suggestions or our code. But no.

Makes it kind of hard to contribute anything back to them.

3 days ago
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NSA Director Says Agency Shares Most, But Not All, Bugs It Finds

Dagger2 Re:Double speak (170 comments)

Or perhaps most of their bug searching is done by subcontractors, so it's not technically the NSA finding any of them.

about three weeks ago
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Debian Talks About Systemd Once Again

Dagger2 Re:Some Sense Restored? (522 comments)

In RHEL 7 and downstreams, you can choose between LVM2, standard partitioning, or btrfs as ways to carve up your disks. It would be nice to have systemd as an option

From what I've heard of systemd, I'm honestly not quite sure whether this was -- as I initially thought -- badly phrased, or if they are in fact planning to roll partitioning into systemd along with everything else.

about a month and a half ago
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Firefox 33 Arrives With OpenH264 Support

Dagger2 Re:More bloat, less marketshare (114 comments)

Mozilla has had nightly 64-bit builds for many months now, but nobody wants to use them to help test and get things working more quickly

You have this backwards. Mozilla tried to kill 64-bit Nightly builds two years ago, even though about 50% of Nightly users were using them at the time. Those users (somewhat predictably) weren't too happy and complained, and Mozilla eventually left 64-bit builds running, but disabled crash reports and automated testing, and refused to commit paid dev time to keeping it compiling or passing the tests. Plus they originally planned to automatically migrate those users to 32-bit, though that never actually happened. That's not exactly "nobody wants to use them to help test".

(References: [1] and [2].)

Of course, fast forward to a few months ago and Chrome's announcements of 64-bit, and suddenly it's "oh, we've been doing 64-bit builds for years".

about a month and a half ago
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Firefox 33 Arrives With OpenH264 Support

Dagger2 Re:Meanwhile, on Pale Moon (114 comments)

Then they replace their UI code so they do all of those things

Nope, different projects. Australis wasn't part of any of those.

and because you don't like it missing some features

More like, Mozilla deliberately killed some features because they thought we were too stupid to handle them, and when people asked them not to, they basically said "sod off, we don't care".

Would you rather have a browser you can still customize away from the defaults, or something like Firefox 2 or 3, where you have to sacrifice a lamb to change the UI substantially

Hm. I'm on Firefox 3.6 and it's a ton easier to customize than Australis. I prefer to have my stop and reload buttons between back/forward and the address bar. On 3.6 I just do it, on Australis I can't do it at all. Same deal with a bunch of other stuff. I guess I can't easily rearrange icons on the status bar, but then I can't do that with Australis either, can I?

presume that the only thing they need to do in order to get their way is spew more and more vitriol

It's more like: we've tried every other option and Mozilla just doesn't give a shit, so what's left to do but to bitch? If we shut up about it, they'll just assume we were complaining because stuff changed, rather than because we didn't like what it changed *to*.

All of that energy could have solved a real problem by now

"My browser pisses me off every time I use it" actually is a real problem for some of us. I groan every time I need to launch Australis to test some newly committed feature, there's no way in hell I could deal with that every single time I need to open a webpage -- and I'd have a hard time getting any other problems solved if I was that pissed off all the time.

about a month and a half ago
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Remote Exploit Vulnerability Found In Bash

Dagger2 Re:Test string here: (399 comments)

SSH can be configured to lock down which commands the user can run; this is common in combination with e.g. gitolite for letting people push to a git repository without giving them full shell access. Anybody with access to such a server can now run arbitrary local commands

about 2 months ago
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Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use

Dagger2 Re:First (24 comments)

That's the general goal of the Free software movement. There's far, far more software out there than any one entity can produce, so 99% of the time you'll be benefiting from the work of other people.

about 2 months ago
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Chrome For Mac Drops 32-bit Build

Dagger2 Re:Addenum: FF is nothing like Chrome (129 comments)

Whereas FF is far and away the MOST customizable

Mozilla are working hard to "fix" this though. It's not even as customizable as its own previous versions.

about 2 months ago
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UCLA, CIsco & More Launch Consortium To Replace TCP/IP

Dagger2 Re: Great idea at the concept stage. (254 comments)

My recommendations to that are a) use DNS anyway (you can limit which clients get access to which zones, so you can keep them internal if you really want), or at least a hosts file, b) pick your IPs carefully to avoid dealing with horrible addresses, c) copy/paste.

e.g.:
# host he.net
he.net has address 216.218.186.2
he.net has IPv6 address 2001:470:0:76::2

16 characters vs 13 characters isn't too bad, and it's the same effort to copy/paste either way... and if NAT is involved then the v4 side gets silly because you have to deal with two addresses for that machine, which is definitely more effort than those 3 extra characters.

about 3 months ago
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UCLA, CIsco & More Launch Consortium To Replace TCP/IP

Dagger2 Re: Great idea at the concept stage. (254 comments)

Neither. That's just an IP.

If it was http://2001::48:8080/ then you'd be connecting on port 80. If it was http://[2001::48:8080]:8080/, then it'd be port 8080. It's not the most wonderful syntax, but it's not ambiguous either... and it's not like anybody deals with IPs on a regular basis anyway, because we have this "DNS" thing that saves you from doing it.

about 3 months ago
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UCLA, CIsco & More Launch Consortium To Replace TCP/IP

Dagger2 Re: Great idea at the concept stage. (254 comments)

That decision was made almost 20 years ago, and I haven't had much luck finding any records of the discussion about it. I can, however, point out that there's a big difference between numbering networks and numbering hosts. A 48-bit space for numbering hosts is tight; a 64-bit space for numbering networks is not.

And your ISP is supposed to be giving at least a /56, so take your allocation size up with them. If they won't give you more, it's not IPv6's fault, it's their fault.

about 3 months ago
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UCLA, CIsco & More Launch Consortium To Replace TCP/IP

Dagger2 Re:Yeah, that's gonna work (254 comments)

Uh... yes there is.

a) Being able to connect to someone else's (or your own) v6 machine is useful.
b) Not needing NAT is very useful. It's much, much easier to manage a network that doesn't use NAT.

Even putting (a) aside, (b) makes it cheaper and nicer to admin your network. Unless you're a masochist, why wouldn't you want that?

about 3 months ago
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UCLA, CIsco & More Launch Consortium To Replace TCP/IP

Dagger2 Re:Great idea at the concept stage. (254 comments)

NAT rewrites addresses; firewalls don't. The former breaks inbound connections and complicates everything for the network admin and for anything that needs to know your IP. There's no reason to do that to yourself unless you absolutely have to.

about 3 months ago
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UCLA, CIsco & More Launch Consortium To Replace TCP/IP

Dagger2 Re:Great idea at the concept stage. (254 comments)

It's not a firewall. NAT doesn't block incoming connections, it breaks incoming connections (and more besides). We should not be basing the internet around something that does that.

about 3 months ago
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UCLA, CIsco & More Launch Consortium To Replace TCP/IP

Dagger2 Re: Great idea at the concept stage. (254 comments)

This is pretty much what IPv6 did.

Once you sit down and hash out all of the details of this "just add a few more octets" plan, you end up with roughly what we've already got. Except, of course, we decided to add 12 octets rather than 2, because 48 bits is hilariously too small for the current internet, let alone to handle future growth.

about 3 months ago
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Mozilla Rolls Out Sponsored Tiles To Firefox Nightly's New Tab Page

Dagger2 Re:Well... (171 comments)

I and others have offered to maintain the features I listed above, and Mozilla have rejected our assistance. I'm an extension developer, and maintain a bunch of extensions which exist for the sole purpose of making recent Firefox versions sane, so this isn't a hollow offer: I (and/or other people) will be maintaining extensions to do these things anyway, but Mozilla is refusing to integrate that code into Firefox.

(Note that CTR is a pretty clear demonstration that you can't do all those things in Firefox, or there wouldn't be an extension for it.)

about 3 months ago
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Mozilla Rolls Out Sponsored Tiles To Firefox Nightly's New Tab Page

Dagger2 Re:Well... (171 comments)

You can't stick stuff on a toolbar at the bottom of the screen, you can't uncombine or even move stop/reload, you can't move back/forward or put buttons between them and the address bar, you can't get rid of the conditional forward button, you can't put the tab toolbar under the navigation toolbar, you can't turn the broken toolbar button styling off with Small Icons mode any more, and you can't put stuff at the far right of the navigation toolbar because the Menu button is there and unmovable. Probably plus other stuff that I've forgotten or not discovered because I don't use Australis.

about 2 months ago
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Seagate Ships First 8 Terabyte Hard Drive

Dagger2 Re:Which Filesystem? (316 comments)

ZFS. It's by far and away the best choice for data storage like this. Even if you ignore its technical features (lz4 and gzip compression, checksumming (including of metadata, which you won't manage with a script), redundant metadata so you don't lose entire directories to a single badly-placed bad block, snapshots and the ability to incrementally send snapshots over a pipe to another pool, native block devices, ...), it's just way nicer to administrate than btrfs, which is the only possible contender.

Just don't be tempted by its dedup. You'll regret turning that on.

about 3 months ago
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New Research Suggests Cancer May Be an Intrinsic Property of Cells

Dagger2 Re:So what they need, then... (185 comments)

By scanning the pattern and constructing a new brain with the same patterns. Implementation details are left as an exercise for the reader.

This seems like it'd be extremely hard but not necessarily impossible. The bigger issue is that you'd essentially be fork()ing your mind -- the original mind would still be stuck in the original body, so the whole procedure wouldn't help it any.

about 3 months ago

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