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Bird uses hurricane winds to accelerate flight speed to 100 MPH

Damien1972 Insects (1 comments)

Makes me wonder how insects navigate through hurricanes -- whether they have any control or are just go wherever the hurricane blows them. Seems like it would be possible to track them, since dragonflies have been tracked before.

more than 2 years ago
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Marijuana farms poisoning carnivorous beasts in CA

Damien1972 another reason to legalize (1 comments)

It's the clandestine pot farms in forests that are the problem. Not the commercial farms in the valley

more than 2 years ago
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New method for finding Bigfoot: leeches

Damien1972 Clarification: Bigfoot vs. Orang Pendek/Yeti (2 comments)

Orang Pendek is a cryptid that according to legend lives in habitat -- Sumatra -- where terrestrial leeches are abundant. The same can be said for the Yeti, which is said to live in Bhutan and Nepal, both of which have terrestrial leeches.

more than 2 years ago
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Sensor enables 3D mapping of rainforests, tree by

Damien1972 1 meter resolution at 10,000 feet (1 comments)

1 meter resolution at 10,000 feet -- that blows away MODIS/Landsat imagery. Kind of wonder what would happen if that technology feel in the "wrong" hands -- e.g. loggers would have an easy time conducting timber assessments.

more than 3 years ago
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Elephants help frogs

Damien1972 Re:Too many elephants can be bad (2 comments)

Well yes, that's true, but the "elephant problem" is a consequence of humans occupying and manipulating their habitat

more than 4 years ago
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Do wind farms drive local warming?

Damien1972 Perfect (1 comments)

Cooling during the day and warming at night sounds like a good thing to me!

more than 4 years ago

Submissions

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New species of tapir discovered in Brazil

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  1 year,5 days

Damien1972 (878814) writes "In what will likely be considered one of the biggest zoological finds of the 21st century, scientists today announced the discovery a new species of tapir in Brazil and Colombia. The new mammal, hidden from science but known to local indigenous tribes, is actually one of the biggest animals on the continent. Described in the Journal of Mammology, the scientists have named the new tapir Tapirus kabomani after the name for "tapir" in the local Paumari language: "Arabo kabomani.""
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Bat's tongue could inspire miniature surgical robot design

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "Nectar-feeding bats shift the shape of their tongue to slurp up sugar from flowers upon which they feed, finds a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Using histological techniques, high-speed videography, and anatomical studies, biologist Cally Harper found that the bat Glossophaga soricina relies on hair-like structures known as papillae on its tongue to extract nectar from flowers. The structures, which become erect when muscle contraction fills them with blood, increase the surface area and width of its tongue tip to create a hydraulic process that causes nectar to flow along the tongue into the bat's mouth. The mechanism is "surprisingly clever" and could inspire medical device design, according to the researchers."
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Civet poop coffee may be threatening wildlife

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "Popularization of the world's strangest coffee may be imperiling a a suite of small mammals in Indonesia, according to a new study in Small Carnivore Conservation. The coffee, known as kopi luwak (kopi for coffee and luwak for the civet), is made from whole coffee beans that have passed through the gut of the animal. The coffee is apparently noted for its distinct taste, though some have argued it is little more than novelty. Now, this burgeoning kopi luwak industry is creating "civet farms," whereby civets are captured from the wild and kept in cages to eat and crap out coffee beans."
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"Badger bat" discovered in South Sudan

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  about a year and a half ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "Scientists have uncovered a rare, brilliantly-striped bat in South Sudan that has yielded new secrets after close study. Working in Bangangai Game Reserve during July of last year, biologist DeeAnn Redeer and conservationist Adrian Garsdie with Fauna & Flora International (FFI) came across an unusual bat, which has been dubbed by various media outlets as the "badger bat" and the "panda bat." The species is so distinct, it has been placed in its own genus."
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62% of Africa's forest elephants killed in 10 years

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  about 2 years ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "More than 60 percent of Africa's forest elephants have been killed in the past decade due to the ivory trade, reports a new study published in the online journal PLOS ONE. The study warns that the diminutive elephant species — genetically distinct from the better-known savanna elephant — is rapidly heading toward extinction. The study is based on the largest-ever set of survey data across five forest elephant range countries: Cameroon, Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Gabon and the Republic of Congo. The study involved more than 60 scientists who spent 91,600 person-days surveying for elephants, walking over 13,000 kilometers."
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Trees to call for help if illegally felled

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  about 2 years ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "The Brazilian government has begun fixing trees in the Amazon rainforest with a wireless device, known as Invisible Tracck, which will allow trees to contact authorities once they are felled and moved. Here's how it works: Brazilian authorities fix the Invisible Tracck onto a tree. An illegal logger cuts down the tree and puts it onto a truck for removal, unaware that they are carrying a tracking device. Once Invisible Tracck comes within 20 miles (32 kilometers) of a cellular network it will 'wake up' and alert authorities."
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Apes suffer mid-life crisis too

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "Humans are not alone in experiencing a mid-life crisis — great apes suffer the same, according to new research in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. A new study of over 500 great apes found that well-being patterns in primates are similar to those experience by humans. This doesn't mean that middle age apes seek out the sportiest trees or hit-on younger apes inappropriately, but rather that their well-being starts high in youth, dips in middle age, and rises again in old age."
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In time for Halloween: 9 new tarantula species discovered

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "If you suffer from acute arachnophobia, this is the perfect Halloween discovery for you: a spider expert has discovered nine new species of arboreal tarantulas in the Brazil. Although tarantula diversity is highest in the Amazon rainforest, the new species are all found in lesser-known Brazilian ecosystems like the Atlantic Forest and the cerrado."
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Scientists name 7000th amphibian, up from 4000 in 1987

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "The number of amphibians described by scientists now exceeds 7,000, or roughly 3,000 more than were known just 25 years ago. A big boost to the effort has come from AmphibiaWeb, a project has sought to document every one of Earth's living frogs, salamanders, newts, and caecilians. But while new species are being discovered, others are disappearing — at least 150 species have gone extinct since the early 1980s."
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Jaguar vs sea turtle

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "At first, an encounter between a jaguar and a green sea turtle seems improbable, even ridiculous, but the two species do come into fatal contact every few years. Despite the surprising nature of such encounters, this behavior has been little studied. Now, a new study in Costa Rica's Tortuguero National Park has documented five years of jaguar attacks on marine turtles—and finds these encounters are not only more common than expected, but on the rise."
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Remote-controlled planes used for wildlife conservation

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  about 2 years ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "Conservationists have converted a remote-controlled plane into a potent tool for conservation. The drone — an HK Bixler equipped with cameras, sensors and GPS — has been used to map deforestation, count orangutans and elephants, and get a bird's eye view of hard-to-access forest areas. During their 4 days of testing in Sumatra, the drone flew 30 missions without a single crash. A mission, which typically lasts about 25 minutes, can cover 50 hectares. The drone, full equipped, costs less than $2,000."
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Scientists find way to produce ethanol from kelp

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "Scientists have devised a way to produce ethanol directly from seaweed. The breakthrough came from identifying the biochemical pathway used by a microbe to digest kelp's structural sugar alginate and inserting the gene into a strain of E. coli which was designed to convert the seaweed sugars directly into ethanol. The discovery offers the potential to generate biofuels that don't compete with terrestrial food production. The research is the cover story this week in Science."
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Giant crab invasion looms in Antarctica

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  about 3 years ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "A 0.12 degree C rise in temperature will spur giant King Crabs to invade the Antarctic continental shelf, causing havoc for its unique ecosystem, reports a study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Temperatures are currently rising 0.01-0.02 per year, meaning it could be less than a decade before the crabs chow down on the soft-bodied invertebrates that currently rule the shelf. “It's much more reminiscent of the Paleozoic era before all those shell-crushing crabs and bony fish and bottom-feeding sharks and rays evolved," said marine biologist Richard Aronson. “The bottom communities in Antarctica are anachronisms. They're a window to the past. They're going to get modernized when these crabs show up.”"
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With Yeti sighting in doubt, will cameratraps help

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "This week a Yeti conference in Russia announced 'indisputable proof' of the legendary hairy ape in the wilds of Southern Siberia. What did this proof consist of? Not DNA, photographs, video, or the Yeti itself (dead or alive) as one would expect from the word 'indisputable', but a few alleged Yeti hairs, an alleged bed, and alleged footprints. Cryptozoologists, those who are fascinated by hidden species such as the proposed Bigfoot, don't serve their cause by stating the reality of a species without the evidence long-deemed necessary by scientific community to prove it instead they make themselves easy targets of scorn and ridicule."
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Rat uses 'poison arrow' toxin from tree

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "The African crested rat, a rodent from East Africa, applies a toxin from tree bark to make itself poisonous, reports a new study published in Proceedings of The Royal Society B. The discovery is the first known instance of a mammal acquiring its poison from a plant. All other known poisonous mammals — including the duck-billed platypus, shrews and the solenodon — produce their toxins themselves."
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Google Earth used to track fish behavior

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "A new study published in Scientific Reports has discovered visible evidence on Google Earth of the interactions between marine predators and prey in the Great Barrier Reef. Studying the satellite imagery of lagoons around remote and protected Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef, researchers found that they could easily identify a phenomenon known as 'grazing halos'. Scientists believe these 'grazing halos' are created by hungry herbivorous fish and sea urchins who pick a region clean of seaweed, revealing the substrate beneath. Seeking protection from predators in a reef, these herbivores venture out to feed only so far, creating a halo-shape around their refuge."
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New sensor x-rays forests, creates 3D species maps

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "A new airplane-based remote-sensing and analysis system will enable scientists to catalog tree species as they create three-dimensional maps of tropical forests. The system uses the most advanced airborne imaging spectrometer ever developed to detect small changes in forest canopy structure from selective logging and distinguish between plant species."
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Rodent thought extinct for 113 years reappears

Damien1972 Damien1972 writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Damien1972 (878814) writes "The red-crested tree rat had not been recorded since 1898 and was thought possibly extinct—that is until one showed up at 9:30 PM on May 4th at a lodge in El Dorado Nature Reserve in northern Colombia. About the size of a guinea pig, the red-crested tree rat had only been known from two skins previously."
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