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Comments

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Ballmer Leaves Microsoft Board

Dan East Re: C (140 comments)

I'm sorry but you're incorrect. In 2007 Windows Mobile had the largest market share of any OS for mobile devices, with 42% of the market:
http://bgr.com/2011/12/13/appl...

They had tied Blackberry the year before, and edged them out in 2007 which was when iPhone was released. Then the next year iPhone took over.

Going back pre-smartphone, when the only real players in the PDA arena were Palm and Microsoft, Microsoft surpassed Palm in 2004, and from then on it was all downhill for Palm as they tried to update an archaic OS to utilize advances in hardware.
http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/65...

Microsoft soundly won the PDA war, but then were totally decimated soon after the PDA market transitioned into the Smart Phone market. In turn, Palm, then Blackberry, then Microsoft all owned the market and then stagnated, failed to innovate, and were superseded by new OSes that didn't have legacy issues (or trying to maintain backwards compatibility, etc).

yesterday
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Ballmer Leaves Microsoft Board

Dan East C (140 comments)

Microsoft remained profitable under Ballmer, but then it also missed some huge opportunities, and totally lost markets that it dominated (like mobile OS with Windows CE / Pocket PC). I give him a C. Maybe a C-.

yesterday
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The Data Dome: A Server Farm In a Geodesic Dome

Dan East Re:Moisture? (59 comments)

In the video the narrator specifically states that the incoming air is filtered.

2 days ago
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The Data Dome: A Server Farm In a Geodesic Dome

Dan East Security (59 comments)

Every time the video showed a door, the narrator had to say that the door is locked. I get it. Doors can be locked. It just seemed there was an agenda in the video to point out to some specific audience the trivial and standard physical security involved, as blatantly obvious as that should be to anyone.

2 days ago
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Facebook Tests "Satire" Tag To Avoid Confusion On News Feed

Dan East Says who? (131 comments)

And who determines if the content at that URL is satirical in nature? Facebook? Looks like they've merely added that "tag" for all URLs from the Onion.

3 days ago
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Auralux Release For Browsers Shows Emscripten Is Reaching Indie Devs

Dan East Native (44 comments)

If your game is written in C++ and OpenGL you can already compile natively for Windows, OSX, iOS, Android and Linux.

about a week ago
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Ask Slashdot: Life Beyond the WRT54G Series?

Dan East Re:ASUS RT-N16 (426 comments)

Plus it has 3 antennas, so it has to be at least 50% better than the WRT54.

about two weeks ago
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Japan To Launch a Military Space Force In 2019

Dan East Awesome! (150 comments)

Let's hope it's comprised of 5 giant mechanical lions that can combine together into a single massive mechanical humanoid.

about two weeks ago
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Amazon's eBook Math

Dan East Re:Disengenous (306 comments)

cheaper books , good for me, but i also like going out to book stores to find something interesting.
in the long term, the book stores go out of business now its harder to find interesting books.

So in other words, you would prefer for everyone to subsidize the brick and mortar shopping environment that you personally enjoy, whereas the majority of other shoppers may not have such preferences and just want to purchase at the lowest possible price. That sound about right?

I'm not trying to sound like a jerk, because I have very fond memories of going into bookstores as a youth (and adult of course) and just the smell alone is wonderful. However like so many other things (photography via chemical coated film that must be developed and printed, etc) its days are numbered.

about three weeks ago
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Ford, GM Sued Over Vehicles' Ability To Rip CD Music To Hard Drive

Dan East Re:The Alliance of Artists should lose this suit (317 comments)

You can do illegal things with a pen and a piece of paper, or a kitchen knife, or any computer, tablet, or cell phone. It is not the responsibility of the manufacturer to attempt to engineer a product that it is impossible to use for an illegal purpose. There is a legitimate use for what Ford and GM has done - people who own music on one media format can time-shift that music for later playback with less manual handling of physical media which is dangerous while driving.

about three weeks ago
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Samsung Delays Tizen Phone Launch

Dan East Re:Yes it should ship! (112 comments)

Apple didn't come from behind in the smartphone market. They created the market. Microsoft and Blackberry had the bulk of the market share, both based on old OSes that had been stagnant for quite a while with no real innovation. Blackberry didn't even offer a touch screen device yet, and Microsoft's could hardly even be used without a stylus.

Apple introduced revolutionary new hardware - capacitive based multitouch technology - which IMO was one of the primary reasons for the success of the iPhone. The other was an OS UI built from the ground up for touch interface. That was a knockout combination.

So no, Tizen doesn't have much chance unless they can bring revolutionary advancements, either hardware or software, like Apple did (and they brought both at the same time).

about three weeks ago
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Amazon Fire Phone Reviews: Solid But Overly Ambitious

Dan East Re:Face tracking? (58 comments)

So the phone can display a 3D model of a car, and shift the perspective and scaling of the car as the phone and / or your eyes move relative to it. Dynamic Perspective.

about a month ago
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A New Form of Online Tracking: Canvas Fingerprinting

Dan East Confusing things together (194 comments)

The research paper discusses two entirely different things: Canvas fingerprinting, and "Evercookies & Respawning", which are two entirely different things. Canvas fingerprinting is just another method of trying to determine which browser the user is running, by looking at differences in the way the canvas renders text and the like. "fingerprinting doesn’t work well on mobile" because of the homogeneous nature of mobile devices - 90% of iOS devices are running version 7.1, for example, so they are all using the same web browser version and rendering code, thus they are going to draw canvas fingerprints exactly the same. Nothing in the research article says anything about canvas fingerprinting being used to track people.

Now the other topic "Evercookies & Respawning" is about tracking users. That is using multiple storage vectors to try and keep users from deleting cookies. For example, using tiny hidden Flash apps which have their own caching, actual cookies, HTML5 persistent storage, embedding unique identifiers directly in the HTML so when the cached page is pulled up the identifier is once again active.

So at this point canvas fingerprinting isn't about tracking, but browser identification. The leap to "A New Form of Online Tracking: Canvas Fingerprinting", as described in the Pro Publica article:

A new, extremely persistent type of online tracking is shadowing visitors to thousands of top websites, from WhiteHouse.gov to YouPorn.com.

First documented in a forthcoming paper by researchers at Princeton University and KU Leuven University in Belgium, this type of tracking, called canvas fingerprinting, works by instructing the visitor’s Web browser to draw a hidden image. Because each computer draws the image slightly differently, the images can be used to assign each user’s device a number that uniquely identifies it.

Well that's completely wrong - the bold text should read "this type of tracking, called Evercookies & Respawning". The persistent tracking has nothing to do with the canvas fingerprinting. It's mainly due to Flash (which also explains why it too is ineffective on mobile devices).

about a month ago
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California In the Running For Tesla Gigafactory

Dan East Which California? (172 comments)

Which California? I hear there are 6 now.

about a month ago
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Microsoft's Missed Opportunities: Memo From 1997

Dan East Too long (161 comments)

That memo is waaaay too long. No wonder none of that stuff happened - no one read past the first page and a half.

about a month ago
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Malaysian Passenger Plane Reportedly Shot Down Over Ukraine

Dan East Re:Wait for it... (752 comments)

Actually, the FAA told US airlines not to fly over Crimea, because in April Russia claimed they controlled air traffic over that airspace. The FAA told US planes not to fly there because it was a convoluted, disputed mess which could lead to accidents. It had nothing to do with risk of being shot down, and that area does not (or did not until today at least) cover the area over Ukraine where this flight was shot down. That flight path would not have been restricted by the FAA.

about a month ago
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Hints of Life's Start Found In a Giant Virus

Dan East Re:What is life? What is a virus? (158 comments)

Everything is a continuum. Humans divide the continuum up using acts of selective attention

Your generalization is quite wrong. Humans classify organisms based on the evidence in front of them. Can you show me this continuum between a platypus and some other animal? How does that fit into the "everything is a continuum" that you speak of?

"Species" do not have particularly crisp boundaries in the general case:

Uh, they most certainly have extremely crisp boundaries. Species are classified by the ability of two organisms to breed with one another. There isn't any "crisper" boundary than that. Once two lineages are different enough, it is no longer possible for them to reproduce sexually with one another. That is a quantum leap, a boolean yes or no situation (at least in 99.9% of the cases). Humans have nothing to do with defining that boundary. It is merely what we have observed and appropriately classified.

about a month ago
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Maldives Denies Russian Claims That Secret Service Kidnapped a Politician's Son

Dan East Carding (100 comments)

accused of running one of the world's largest carding operations

What's carding? Like hacked SIM cards or something?

about a month ago
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Study: Why the Moon's Far Side Looks So Different

Dan East Re:Rotation (79 comments)

But really, did the earth stay hot enough for "a few million years" - hot enough to affect the locked side of the moon more than the other?

The moon has no atmosphere, thus radiation from the earth cannot affect the far side of the moon at all. So obviously, even to this day, the earth still affects "the locked side of the moon more than the other". The question is simply how much. The moon and earth were both molten after the collision, so it was not a matter of the earth being hot enough to melt the moon, but merely the earth imparting energy to prolong the cooling of the near side. No matter what, the near side must have cooled slower than the far side - it's a straightforward matter of thermodynamics. One side of the moon was receiving energy from the earth while the other side was not. The near side didn't need to stay so hot it was incandescent, but merely "softer" so that small impacts would heal more on the near side than the far side, and the duration only needed to be long enough to result in some degree of visible difference, which is what we still see today.

The whole thing sounds plausible to me.

about a month and a half ago
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Python Bumps Off Java As Top Learning Language

Dan East Pascal (415 comments)

Wait!!! What happened to Pascal?!?!? On a more serious note, Pascal was the premier teaching language back in the day, but it really wasn't used much in the real world. It was a stepping stone for learning C, which is where the real power was at and what "real" applications were developed in. I believe there is less disconnect today between the popular learning languages and what is actually utilized in the real world.

about a month and a half ago

Submissions

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Facebook HTML Escaping Broken?

Dan East Dan East writes  |  about 3 years ago

Dan East (318230) writes "It appears that Facebook's HTML escaping has been bypassed or otherwise hacked. Currently this is being used to embed tags in regular FB posts to display gaudy animated GIFs. However this technique should work for any other HTML tags. The user Facebook Art's wall is the current source of these annoying posts, which other FB users are in turn sharing on their own walls."
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Zuckerberg's Generosity

Dan East Dan East writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Dan East (318230) writes "Mark Zuckerberg, billionaire founder of Facebook, has decided to share some of his wealth with dedicated FB users, who were ultimately responsible for his fortune. Each time you enter the following key presses into Facebook (max once per hour) you will receive a $5 credit on your FB account (part of the advertising system):
UP UP DOWN DOWN LEFT RIGHT LEFT RIGHT B A ENTER
Please repost — it is for TODAY only!"

Link to Original Source
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Thousands of blackbirds fall from sky dead

Dan East Dan East writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Dan East (318230) writes "In a fashion worthy of a King or Hitchcock novel, yesterday blackbirds began to fall from the sky dead. Somewhere between 4,000 and 5,000 birds rained down on the small town of Beeb, Arkansas, with no visible trauma. Officials are making wild guesses as to what happened — lightning strike, high-altitude hail, or perhaps trauma from the sound of New Year's fireworks killed them."
Link to Original Source
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$1 million to find Toyota acceleration problem

Dan East Dan East writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Dan East (318230) writes "Amid the controversy over Toyota's runaway cars, the Edmunds.com web site is offering a $1 million prize to any tinkerer who can figure out the cause of the phenomenon. The prize will go to a person who can "demonstrate in a controlled environment a repeatable factor that will cause an unmodified new vehicle to accelerate suddenly and unexpectedly." Edmunds will make details of the competition available later this month."
Link to Original Source
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Avast! Antivirus reporting massive false positives

Dan East Dan East writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Dan East (318230) writes "Due to a problem with the antivirus definition update 091203-0 on December 2nd, Avast! Antivirus began reporting that many applications were infected with the trojan Win32:delf-MZG. There are widespread accounts of this on the net, and Avast's support forums have been down for close to 12 hours due to the massive amount of traffic from users seeking more information on the problem. The problem has reportedly been corrected with the 091203-1 update, but many installations may not update automatically in time to receive the update before end users are affected. Avast typically prompts end users when infected items are found, asking them how to clean it. If the user selects "Delete" then software, or the entire OS, could be rendered unusable. The Avast! Blog is still silent on the matter."
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DVD Saves Firefighter's Life

Dan East Dan East writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Dan East writes "Fire Chief Barry McRoy credits a DVD with saving his life — literally. McRoy was trying to leave a restaurant when two men, fighting over a gun, entered. During the fray the gun went off, and Chief McRoy's stomach started hurting. At first he thought the pain was from the percussion of the shot, since he was so close to the men and they were all enclosed in the small glass foyer together. However, upon reaching into his pocket he found, amongst the shattered DVD pieces, the bullet that had just been fired. In the video still it is clear the disc is a DVD-R, but the brand is not visible."
Link to Original Source
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Fake Wikipedia edit predicts murder

Dan East Dan East writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Dan East (318230) writes "In a bizarre twist of fate, a bogus news post to Wikipedia predicted the death of WWE wrester Chris Benoit's wife 14 hours before her body was discovered in a presumed murder / suicide. Police believe Benoit murdered his wife and 7-year-old son before committing suicide by hanging himself in a piece of exercise equipment. The fake news posting to the Chris Benoit article read "Chris Benoit was replaced by Johnny Nitro for the ECW Championship match at Vengeance, as Benoit was not there due to personal issues, stemming from the death of his wife Nancy". The person responsible for the posting later confessed that his edit was speculative as to why Benoit canceled a scheduled appearance at a wresting event on Sunday. The editor's computer equipment has been confiscated while police try to determine if he was actually involved in the murder."
Link to Original Source
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Dan East Dan East writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Dan East (318230) writes "I volunteered to speak at my daughter's school for Career Day, and have been asked to give presentations to three different classes tomorrow. As a software developer, how can I pique the curiosity of 4th graders, while generating interest in an occupation that will need an even larger workforce in the future? I mainly do application development in the health care arena, but I've also created a 3D game engine, ported Quake and Quake2 to various platforms (Pocket PC), developed backends for a few web sites, and created a number of embedded solutions using microcontrollers. Should I limit myself to the "cool" stuff like gaming so they can at least relate to what I do? If you had to get up in front of a bunch of 4th graders, what would you say?

I know that today children are exposed to computers more than ever in school. Unfortunately, students are not introduced to software development at all in most school environments. When I was in 7th grade (1983) every class spent time in the computer room (full of TRS-80s) and were taught rudimentary programming. Yes, all of us, every single student, had to write software. Even prior to that I learned to program on my TI-99/4A by typing in BASIC programs listed in the monthly Compute! magazine. Children today are taught text editing, how to surf the net, and other very "generic" computer skills, and of course take tests and "play" various learning games on computers. Perhaps I should demonstrate some simple BASIC programming, or what that be too much?"
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Dan East Dan East writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Dan East (318230) writes "Researchers at Cornell University have determined that moderate strength solar flares can disrupt the GPS system. A graduate student first noticed the effect in 2005, and additional studies have correlated solar flares with reductions in GPS signal strength. The researches express concern over the use of GPS in "safety-of-life" situations like air travel, especially during the solar cycle peak in 2011 and 2012.

From the article:
solar flares are accompanied by solar radio bursts. Because the bursts occur over the same frequency bands at which GPS satellites transmit, receivers can become confused, leading to a loss of signal."
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Dan East Dan East writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Dan East writes "Bob Dillian, in an interview with Rolling Stone magazine, bashed modern audio technology while showing an indifference to file sharing. A few key quotes, "There's no definition of nothing, no nothing, just like... static". Regarding illegal file sharing Dillian mused "Well, why not? It ain't worth nothing anyway." Finally, even the physical form-factor of the CD medium is an issue with Dillian, "CDs are small, there's no stature to it". I can't wait to hear his remarks when he learns music can be stored on SD cards."

Journals

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Mod points...

Dan East Dan East writes  |  more than 3 years ago

I think this is the most mod points burnt on one of my posts so far. Looks like 20 or so mod points were used on one post.

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Interesting (+1).

It is currently scored Normal (2).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Insightful (+1).

It is currently scored Interesting (3).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Insightful (+1).

It is currently scored Insightful (4).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Insightful (+1).

It is currently scored Insightful (5).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Troll (-1).

It is currently scored Insightful (4).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Overrated (-1).

It is currently scored Insightful (3).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Insightful (+1).

It is currently scored Insightful (4).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Interesting (+1).

It is currently scored Insightful (5).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Overrated (-1).

It is currently scored Insightful (4).

A user had given a moderation of Insightful (+1) to your comment, Re:Make it static., attached to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort. That moderation has now been undone, probably due to the user posting in the discussion after moderating in it. Your comment is currently scored Insightful (3).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Overrated (-1).

It is currently scored Insightful (2).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Underrated (+1).

It is currently scored Insightful (3).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Overrated (-1).

It is currently scored Insightful (2).

A user had given a moderation of Overrated (-1) to your comment, Re:Make it static., attached to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort. That moderation has now been undone, probably due to the user posting in the discussion after moderating in it. Your comment is currently scored Insightful (3).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Interesting (+1).

It is currently scored Insightful (4).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Insightful (+1).

It is currently scored Insightful (5).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Overrated (-1).

It is currently scored Insightful (4).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Insightful (+1).

It is currently scored Insightful (5).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Troll (-1).

It is currently scored Insightful (4).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Insightful (+1).

It is currently scored Insightful (5).

Re:Make it static., posted to WikiLeaks Starts Mass Mirroring Effort, has been moderated Overrated (-1).

It is currently scored Insightful (4).

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