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Obama Lied About Benghazi

Daniel_Stuckey What still hangs me up to this day (8 comments)

You'd think, if something like a YouTube video had caused such an event, and that there was actual certainty there, that everyday people wouldn't have been able to keep their eyes off of it.

I think it says something about the general messaging—on Hilary's part (& her stroke), and on Obama's part—that lacks any confidence in the first place.

That most people I've ever asked, "Have you ever watched Innocence of Muslims?," have all said no still really weirds me out. We know that the administration latched onto the video, despite it having the supposed effect it did. They moreso acknowledged that they had lied. I just find it compelling almost, that no one has really studied the evidence that they'd tried to pass off.

I mean, what could be more off-the-wall than the idea that a YouTube video was to blame for an attack? Nevertheless, it's the narrative we were presented with right off the bat. In my case, I actually saw the video before I knew the details of the raids.

http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/the-film-that-caused-the-egyptian-embassy-raid

http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/interview-terry-jones-takes-death-threats-with-cups-of-decaf

about 9 months ago
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The Greatest Keyboard Shortcut Ever

Daniel_Stuckey Re:... Keyboard shortcuts are news? (506 comments)

Yeah, this is just disappointing. It's cute, and yes, I'll admit to posting things here that I sometimes feel are more suited for /r/todayilearned, but what angered me the most about this was that the OP would might think this is something /. didn't or needed to know.

about a year ago
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Twitter-Based Study Figures Out Saddest Spots In New York City

Daniel_Stuckey Whoa whoa whoa whoa, wait a second. (57 comments)

2 things,

1) I posted this yesterday afternoon, which I fully understand. I shouldn't have expected to be selected. No big deal.

But really?
2) I've tweeted about enjoying Guy Fieri's food, on two occasions. It's actually not the worst thing ever: Fuck Pete Wells.

about a year ago
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Soda Makes Five-Year-Olds Break Your Stuff, Science Finds

Daniel_Stuckey Re: Correlation does not imply causation (287 comments)

Which I felt I pointed out here, that we have this survey, sampling thousands of mothers (no fathers), about the behavior and consumption habits of their 5-year-olds (not 1 or 7-year-olds) and asks questions with the word "baby's father" in them about abusive partners. It is supposedly a survey about soda consumption in young children that satisfies hardly anything about the type of soda, which when we consider aspartame let's say, has elsewhere been related to irritability and making people feel shitty. Read the study!, where they cite other studies that wanted to learn about the contents more than the broad category "soft drinks," which in my opinion, includes a seltzer water, does it not? When I first saw the briefings for the study, I found it hilarious how little it looked at which sodas they were having, and that it intended to find so much more about other variables we'd assume to affect the child's behavior. It is why I felt like highlighting the absurdity of the conclusion, which was satisfied by finding that everything else collected had less to do with these behaviors than the soda factor that it little to no extra data about. Nothing more than a mother's reporting of her child's approximate consumption habits.

about a year ago
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What is Cloud?

Daniel_Stuckey A sweatshop for data (2 comments)

Dense, bulky, cost-efficient, energy-sucker with copyright termination and easy access written all over it.

1 year,13 days
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US Mining Data Directly From 9 Silicon Valley Companies

Daniel_Stuckey So much for CISPA (404 comments)

With PRISM / BLARNEY, this battle is pointless, amirite?

about a year ago
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The World's First Bitcoin ATM Dispenses Cyprus Bills

Daniel_Stuckey Re:Race to the bottom (2 comments)

If I had substantial money to put on it, it'd all be on Bitcoin.

about a year ago
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Riot Breaks Out At Foxconn

Daniel_Stuckey Video of the 'iPhone Riot' (456 comments)

http://motherboard.vice.com/2012/9/24/the-foxconn-iphone-riot-was-just-one-of-hundreds-in-china-today While it might have been an intramural fight between the Foxconn employees in this case, this is the mere tip of a giant Chinese iceberg. Sure, Foxconn builds electronics as cheaply as it can for whomever wants to cut a deal with them... That's been part of the company's mission statement since it was founded, but should this stop people like Anthony Kosner at Forbes from approaching or musing on the idea that the heightened demand for a product like iPhone has just gotta be killing people in China for the sake of consumer contempt over issues like the phone being too lightweight. Ugh, the absurdity. I wonder if we can find out how many iPhone units have been returned because the customer 'didn't like it enough.'

about 2 years ago

Submissions

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Israel Is Outgunning Hamas On Social Media, Too

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  5 days ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "While IDF planes drop bombs on Gaza and Hamas fires rockets from inside its borders, both groups are also tweeting, sharing, and promoting the war every step of the way.

The Gaza conflict has offered up its own brand of Twitter war between the Israeli Defense Forces and Hamas, who are squaring off in an online social media battle to match the on-the-ground campaign. And just as in the physical world, in the cyber version playing out in social media, the weaponry the Israelis deploy far outclasses Hamas capabilities.

The IDF has been disseminating a mixture of images, tweets, and YouTube videos designed to both justify their operations and perform the classic strategy of any military PSYOP—defining your enemy in no uncertain terms."

Link to Original Source
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A Drone Saved an Elderly Man Who Had Been Missing for Three Days

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about a week ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "A drone was just used to save a life: Earlier this week, an elderly man who was missing for three days was found with the help of a drone in Wisconsin.

82-year-old Guillermo DeVenecia had been missing for three days. Search dogs, a helicopter, and hundreds of volunteers had spent days looking for him. David Lesh, a Colorado-based skier (catch him doing a double front flip here, because, why not) decided to look for him using his drone—and found him within 20 minutes.

"We weren't really sure what we would find or what kind of shape he would be in if we did find him . I don't think any of us expected to find him," Lesh told the Madison NBC affiliate, WMTV. "We noticed a man out in the field sort of stumbling, a little disoriented.""

Link to Original Source
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Crowdsourced Video Games Are a Terrible Idea

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about a week ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "You can choose from characters like a Mudkip, a tank, a core from Portal and Nic Cage. For weapons you've got your pick of a pistol, a turtle and what looks like a shake-weight. Every text on the option menu is written in Doge-tongue, with Doge's ghostly, wandering face fading in when you hover the cursor around.

The game I’m talking about, please be nice :(, is a messy club sandwich of a production, too drenched from memes to avoid collapsing all over your fries. But game developer Aran Koning knew this would happen, or he wouldn’t have ended the title in a frowny face.

Aran knew he needed this virtual-roundtable force to channel into a game. 133 additions later to please be nice :(, and Koning’s team has only ever rejected the suggestion of ‘twerking.’"

Link to Original Source
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Is Your Phone On? Yes, There Is an App for That

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about two weeks ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "I caught wind of a new app called ON?. It forefronts the simplest and most frequently asked question of all: "Is my phone on?" If you're old enough to own a land line, then a dial tone should be relief enough. But cell phones don't have dial tones. So what's the next best thing?

Of course, the glow of a lover's late-night text doth tell us the phone still has life. But when a lover is away or if you haven't paid your bill, there's no simple, frictionless way to make sure that a phone is really, in fact, working.

Unfortunately, ON? has yet to be accepted by the guardians of Apple's app store. It remains unreleased, banned, censored. This despite its helpful support page and an experienced, eager bunch of capitalistic founders."

Link to Original Source
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'Hidden From Google' Remembers the Sites Google Is Forced to Forget

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about two weeks ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "Hidden From Google, the brainchild of a web programmer in New Jersey, archives each website that Google is required to take down from European Union search listings thanks to the recent court decision that allows people to request that certain pages be scrubbed from Google's search results if they're outdated or irrelevant. That decision has resulted in takedown requests from convicted sex offenders and huge banking companies, among thousands of others."
Link to Original Source
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Dubai's Climate-Controlled Dome City Is a Dystopia Waiting to Happen

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about three weeks ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "Dubai is building "the world's first climate-controlled city"—it's a 4.3 mile pedestrian mall that will be covered with a retractable dome to provide its shoppers with air conditioning in the summer heat. The Mall of the World, as it's called, will become the sort of spectacular, over-the-top attraction Dubai is known for. Shortly after, it will probably become an equally spectacular real-world dystopia.

By sectioning off a 3-million-square-foot portion of the city with an air conditioned dome, Dubai is dropping one of the most tangible partitions between the haves and the have nots of the modern era—the 100 hotels and apartment complexes inside the attraction will be cool, comfortable, and nestled into a entertainment-filled, if macabre, consumer paradise."

Link to Original Source
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The Speed of Hypocrisy: How America Got Hooked on Legal Meth

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about a month ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "A terrible number of words have been written about Breaking Bad , yet none have struck upon the irony at its core. For all of the cult hit’s vaunted fine-brush realism and sly cultural references, the show never even winked at the real world “blue” that grew up alongside it. During the five years Heisenberg spent as a blue-meth cook, the nation experienced a nonfictional explosion in the manufacture and sale of sapphire pills and azure capsules containing amphetamine. This other “blue,” known by its trade names Adderall and Vyvanse, found its biggest market in classrooms like Walter White’s. As this blue speed is made and sold in anodyne corporate environments, the drama understandably focused on blue meth and its buyers, usually depicted as jittery tweakers picking at lesions and wearing rags on loan from the cannibal gangs of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road."
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If Police Want to Search Your Phone, They Need to "Get a Warrant": Supreme Court

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about a month ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "In a ruling anticipated for years, the Supreme Court unanimously agreed that police must have a warrant to search a person's cell phone. The ruling, which is strong in its defense of Fourth Amendment rights in the digital space, is a landmark decision for the treatment and protection of individuals' data.

"Modern cell phones are not just another technological convenience," reads Chief Justice John Robert's opinion. "With all they contain and all they may reveal, they hold for many Americans 'the privacies of life.'"

"The fact that technology now allows an individual to carry such information in his hand does not make the information any less worthy of the protection for which the Founders fought," it continues. "Our answer to the question of what police must do before searching a cell phone seized incident to an arrest is accordingly simple—get a warrant.""

Link to Original Source
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Exclusive: How an FBI Informant Orchestrated the Hack of an FBI Contractor

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about a month and a half ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "Weeks after he started working quietly as an FBI informant, Hector Xavier Monsegur, known by his online alias "Sabu," led a cyber attack against one of the bureau's very own IT contractors.

In July 2011, at Monsegur's urging, members of AntiSec, an offshoot of the hacking collective Anonymous, took advantage of compromised log-in credentials belonging to a contractor with a top secret security clearance employed at the time by ManTech International.

According to chat logs recorded by Monsegur at the behest of the FBI and obtained by Motherboard, the informant directed hackers to pilfer as much data as possible from ManTech's servers as investigators stood by. Stolen data was published as the third installment of AntiSec's "Fuck FBI Friday" campaign: a collection of leaks intended to embarrass the same federal agency that presided over the hack and others."

Link to Original Source
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Facebook Is Making Us All Live Inside Emotional 'Filter Bubbles'

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about a month and a half ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "It hopefully doesn't come as a surprise that your friends shape who you are. But we tend to think of that on a micro level: If your close circle of friends tends to have tattoos, wear polo shirts, or say "chill" a lot, it's quite possible that you'll emulate them over time—and they'll emulate you too.

But what happens on a macro scale, when your friend circle doesn't just include the dozen people you actually hang out with regularly, but also the hundreds or thousands of acquaintances you have online? All of those feeds may seem filled with frivolities from random people (and they are!) but that steady stream of life updates—photos, rants, slang—are probably shaping you more than you think.

A massive Facebook study recently published in PNAS found solid evidence of so-called emotional contagion—emotional states spreading socially, like a virus made of emoji—on the social network."

Link to Original Source
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Why the Moon's New Birthday Means the Earth Is Older Than We Thought

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about a month and a half ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "You're likely familiar with the theory of how the Moon formed: a stray body smashed into our young Earth, heating the planet and flinging debris into its orbit. That debris coalesced and formed the Moon. The impact theory still holds, but a team of geochemists from the University of Lorraine in Nancy, France has refined the date, finding that the Moon is about 60 million years older than we thought. As it turns out, that also means the Earth is 60 million years older than previously thought, which is a particularly cool finding considering just how hard it is to estimate the age of our planet."
Link to Original Source
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Massive security flaws allowed for Stratfor hack, leaked report reveals

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about a month and a half ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "The intelligence firm at the center of a notorious cybersecurity breach that affected top government officials failed to institute standard security measures prior to the attack, according to a newly leaked report. In December 2011, a group of skilled hackers broke into the network of Strategic Forecasting, Inc. (Stratfor), compromising the personal data of some 860,000 customers, including a former U.S. vice president, CIA director, and secretary of state, among others. For Stratfor, a Texas-based geopolitical intelligence and consulting firm, the incident was an international embarrassment that caused roughly $3.78 million in total damages—and all of it could’ve been avoided by meeting common fraud prevention requirements."
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Project Un1c0rn Wants to Be the Google for Lazy Security Flaws

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about 1 month ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "Following broad security scares like that caused by the Heartbleed bug, it can be frustratingly difficult to find out if a site you use often still has gaping flaws. But a little known community of software developers is trying to change that, by creating a searchable, public index of websites with known security issues. Think of Project Un1c0rn as a Google for site security. Launched on May 15th, the site's creators say that so far it has indexed 59,000 websites and counting. The goal, according to its founders, is to document open leaks caused by the Heartbleed bug, as well as "access to users' databases" in Mongo DB and MySQL. According to the developers, those three types of vulnerabilities are most widespread because they rely on commonly used tools. For example, Mongo databases are used by popular sites like LinkedIn, Expedia, and SourceForge, while MySQL powers applications such as WordPress, Drupal or Joomla, and are even used by Twitter, Google and Facebook."
Link to Original Source
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The FCC Was Hacked After John Oliver Called for Net Neutrality Trolls

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about a month and a half ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "When HBO host John Oliver called for Internet trolls to deluge the Federal Communications Commission with comments about net neutrality, he may not have expected for the FCC's site to get shut down. That, however, is exactly what happened, but it wasn’t because Oliver’s viewers overwhelmed the site with public comments, as was widely reported. In fact, shortly after Oliver’s 13-minute rant last Sunday, the FCC’s website was compromised by attackers who effectively shut down the site’s commenting system using a database Denial of Service attack, the FCC confirmed to Motherboard on Tuesday."
Link to Original Source
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This Kid Got Assaulted for Flying His Drone on a Beach

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about 1 month ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "Regardless of the hobby's legality, flying drones have been a touchy subject with some members of the public—namely, those worried about being filmed or photographed in public. In at least one case, that fear has turned violent: A woman was recently arrested in Connecticut for assaulting a hobby drone pilot. The whole thing, naturally, was captured on tape, which was originally posted by the pilot, Austin Haughwout, but has since been taken down by YouTube. Part of the video has made its way over to LiveLeak, which you can watch here. As you'll see, the woman, who is identified in arrest reports as Andrea Mears, is shown calling the police—she says that Haughwout is "taking pictures of people on the beach" with a "helicopter plane." Mears then attacks Haughwout, rips his shirt, and appears to get him in a leg lock. She puts her fingers in his mouth, and they exchange some words."
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Exclusive: How an FBI Informant Helped Anonymous Hack Brazil

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about 2 months ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "A year after leaked files exposed the National Security Agency's efforts to spy on citizens and companies in Brazil, previously unpublished chat logs obtained by Motherboard reveal that while under the FBI's supervision, Hector Xavier Monsegur, widely known by his online persona, "Sabu," facilitated attacks that affected Brazilian websites.

The operation raises questions about how the FBI uses global Internet vulnerabilities during cybercrime investigations, how it works with informants, and how it shares information with other police and intelligence agencies.

After his arrest in mid-2011, Monsegur continued to organize cyber attacks while working for the FBI. According to documents and interviews, Monsegur passed targets and exploits to hackers to disrupt government and corporate servers in Brazil and several other countries.

Details about his work as a federal informant have been kept mostly secret, aired only in closed-door hearings and in redacted documents that include chat logs between Monsegur and other hackers. The chat logs remain under seal due to a protective order upheld in court, but in April, they and other court documents were obtained by journalists at Motherboard and the Daily Dot."

Link to Original Source
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The Forensic Dentist Who's Reviving Mexico's Unidentified Corpses (NSFW)

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about 2 months ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "CIUDAD JUAREZ — The man cuts a striking profile. He’s been dead for two years—a nameless hit-and-run victim, I’m told, left to bleed out on the side of some dusty road in this Mexico-US border town of 1.5 million people. The accident punched a hole in his forehead. From where I’m standing, hunched over an autopsy stretcher on which his body is strewn akimbo, I can see through to his pickled brain. If I didn’t know any better, there's still life in this man. It’s been 120 hours since Dr. Alejandro Hernández Cárdenas got to work. That’s when Hernández Cárdenas, an unassuming local dentist who splits his time practicing, teaching graduate forensic odontology courses at the Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez, and identifying the unidentified at the Juarez Forensic Science Lab, submerged this man’s gnarled, sun-scorched body into what Hernández Cárdenas affectionately calls the “Jacuzzi.”"
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The Latest Wave of Cyberattacks on the West Is Coming from the Middle East

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about 2 months ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "A hacker group from the Middle East known as Molerats attacked a wide range of major public sector organisations over April and May, including the BBC and a smattering of European governments, researchers revealed today. The latest attacks, which sought to establish espionage operations on targets’ digital infrastructure, took place between 29 April and 27 May, according to security technology vendor FireEye. The Molerats’ actions have added weight to concerns around growing cyber capability stemming from the Middle East. Yet researchers are somewhat perplexed as to the motivation of the perpetrators, whose targets included both Israel and Palestine, as well as Turkey, Slovenia, Macedonia, New Zealand and Latvia. The hackers also went after government bodies in the US and the UK."
Link to Original Source
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The Energy Saved By Ditching DVDs Could Power 200,000 Homes

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about 2 months ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "If you still buy DVDs, you're killing the environment. Maybe that's a little extreme, but the environmental benefits of streaming a movie (or downloading it) rather than purchasing a DVD are staggering, according to a new US government study by researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. If all DVDs purchased in 2011 were streamed instead, the energy savings would have been enough to meet the electricity demands of roughly 200,000 households. It would have cut roughly 2 billion kilograms of carbon emissions. According to the study, published in Environmental Research Letters , even when you take into account cloud storage, data servers, the streaming device, streaming uses much less energy than purchasing a DVD. If, like me, you're thinking, "who buys DVDs anymore, anyways," the answer is "a lot of people.""
Link to Original Source
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Five Things We've Already Forgotten About Snowden's NSA Leaks

Daniel_Stuckey Daniel_Stuckey writes  |  about 2 months ago

Daniel_Stuckey (2647775) writes "The Edward Snowden saga is coming to a close. As a final act, Glenn Greenwald, who's been working closely with the whistleblower to publish leaked information about the National Security Agency, has said he will reveal a list of Americans that have been targeted by the NSA. And tonight, Snowden will be giving his first American television interview to NBC. It’s been a dizzying year of revelations about US government spying. Programs like PRISM—the ones capable of mass surveillance—have received the most media attention, and in some cases even become household names. But there are other things exposed in the string of leaks that have received relatively little media attention, despite presenting serious threats to privacy, freedom of speech, and the way we use the web. Here's a look back at some of those forgotten discoveries."
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