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FCC Fines Verizon For Failing To Investigate Rural Phone Problems

DarkOx Re:So what next? (77 comments)

he broke the rule of being wealthy which is to not take advantage of wealthier people/companies.

There fixed that for you

3 hours ago
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FCC Fines Verizon For Failing To Investigate Rural Phone Problems

DarkOx Re:So what next? (77 comments)

If they can pay 5 mil a year and it costs 10 mil to fix the issues, then I'll take the fine every time.

I don't even the likes of Verizon would act that way. I know short term profits are everything but so are anticipated future earnings, if the cost of fixing the problem was only equal to a few years of fines, they'd fix that rather than putting the anticipated futures fines in their SEC filings.

Now if it was going to be like 10 years or more before the fines exceeded the cost to fix it, than they might just decided to pay the fines as if they are a just another tax.

3 hours ago
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Police Organization Wants Cop-Spotting Dropped From Waze App

DarkOx License plates (419 comments)

I think we should drop license plate requirements. I mean seriously driving around with a big personal identifier on my vehicle puts the lives of me and my family at risk. It makes it trivial for stalkers to track me. They can tell what place of business I am at just by observing my car is in the lot.

Some information is public. It just is the cops are all to happy to argue you have not fourth amendment protection against them setting up cameras all over town with OCR to recognize plates and compiling a big database that essentially knows where you are at all times. That's no problem I mean anyone can see your vehicle out in public view right and anyone could compile such information? sure..

As soon as the public does something remotely similar, but decidedly less intrusive in that it does not track specific cops. OMG its a problem won't somebody please think of these brave officers we are putting at risk!

Fuck that! If I have to be watched all the time so do they!

9 hours ago
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Davos 2015: Less Innovation, More Regulation, More Unrest. Run Away!

DarkOx Regulation what a fucking joke (310 comments)

Regulation IS the problem. Had we done the principled thing and let AIG and Goldman burn when the time came it would have taken lots of big finance with it. There would have been plenty of churn as far as just who the 1% are. I would even guess some of them would have been left with less than nothing.

Oh but they would still have all kinds of physical property and hard assets. Yes but assets sometimes have a funny way of turning into liabilities when you don't have the case flow to manage them properly. Just imagine if you can't pay your home owners policy on your Mansion you can still get sued when someone breaks their leg while trespassing.

These guys are where they are entirely because of governments and regulation. Income inequality is greater than what existed in the gilded age! These levels of inequality are made possible by regulation and free market impediments, not for lack of them.

10 hours ago
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Eric Schmidt: Our Perception of the Internet Will Fade

DarkOx Re:If all goes well. . . (228 comments)

The biggest problem with home automation is 'life happens', eventually you want to put things into a state that was never originally anticipated.

Maybe the computer thinks, windows are open = turn off HVAC, or switch to fan only etc. Trouble is grandma stopped by and burned her Christmas cookies, smells terrible in the house, you want the windows open but you want to also leave the heat on, so you don't freeze.

Now you have to go override some "smart" system some where. It all ends up being just as much work as turning things on and off by hand was in the first place.

4 days ago
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Should Disney Require Its Employees To Be Vaccinated?

DarkOx Re:Yes. (657 comments)

No the entire argument is silly. I could just as easily suggest drug test makes sense in fast food because who knows, someone with a drug addled mind might thing its a good idea to wipe the grill down with drain cleaner before cooking my burger.

No business have the right to do whatever they like and require whatever they want as conditions of employment, but they should not be encouraged to reach into the private lives of employees. Drug testing is intrusive, and costly. Requiring it should be a quick way to make sure your company isn't on any of those 'best places to work lists'

What companies should do is simply check their employees arrive for work in state they can do it effectively and safely in. At your fast food restaurant if the Assistant Manager can't be arsed to walk around and make sure workers don't appear to be to 'high' to do their jobs properly you got bigger problems than anything a drug test is going to uncover.

Someplace like Disney has tonnes of pre-open check lists and radio check-ins etc. If lower management can't spot operator that shows up to work drugged out than once again drug tests are not the answer. I have seen guys come it work with fevers before from flu and back fork lifts into other employees etc. Drug tests don't screen for flu. There is no substitute for a quick 'hello' and occasional walk arounds for employees who operate hazardous equipment or work in conditions that may be dangerous to them or others. Does matter if its a roller coaster or fryer filled with scalding oil! It also does not matter if said employee was 'tripping balls' 7 hours ago, it matters they are sober while on the job!

4 days ago
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Silk Road Journal Found On Ulbricht's Laptop: "Everyone Knows Too Much"

DarkOx Re:Journal? (180 comments)

Yea, but know all the folks actually majoring in Crime, just copy their answers off the Criminology major in the front of the room who is just taking class as an elective. The Crime students never do the reading...

5 days ago
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Science By Democracy Doesn't Work

DarkOx Re:The good thing about it is.. (463 comments)

This is why our system is so messed up. This why the lobbyists and influence vendors have power. This why our laws are written such that not even the people who enact them really know what they mean.

The reason is voters like you, are willing to let them off the hook. When these guys sign their name to it they need to be accountable for it FULL STOP. You should not let them make excuses like oh well it was must pass....

No all those democrats who voted for the ACA better be willing to stand up and say proudly "I thought all the giveaways, deceptions, curtailment of individual freedoms, in the ACA were worth it to get something done." If they can't say that than they are not fit to represent you.

Same with this everyone who voted for this need to either agree with statements on climate, or admit there principle position on scientific integrity is subject to getting even relatively unimportant things done like Keystone XL.

5 days ago
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Science By Democracy Doesn't Work

DarkOx Re:Science by democracy doesn't work? (463 comments)

We should base policy on what the majority of 'the people' (read voters without regard for what internationally other people want) wish to do, after they have been made aware of the risk a large number of scientists believe to exist.

5 days ago
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Windows Server 2003 Reaches End of Life In July

DarkOx Re:A reason to go with Open Source (156 comments)

That is a valid point. There is a lot Linux in the embedded and 'quasi-embedded' space that does never get updated.

That is a little different than what we normally think of as application servers that IT would be responsible for migrating. In the 'quasi-embedded' like the climate system you describe where there is basically a PC attached to some machinery you are correct. The opsticle to upgrading these things has little to do with Linux or Windows though, and everything to do with the machinery vendors unwillingness to QA or support anything other than their original configurations. You see the same situation happen with Windows boxen all the time as well just walk around any hospital or machine shop floor and you will see all sorts of DOS/Win9x/XP - pre SP2 about. Its not Microsoft's fault really nor any Linux distro maintainers where this happens.

As to the embedded space, routers, switches, headless controllers, PLCs. The amount of out data Linux out there with potentially major flaws is terrifying.

5 days ago
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Healthcare.gov Sends Personal Data To Over a Dozen Tracking Websites

DarkOx Re:Wow... Just "no". (203 comments)

Why are you surprised the entire 'Affordable' care is really just a pile of giveaways to certain monied interests.

I mean come on the left the private insurance industry in place, while all but forcing the public to buy their product. The left them with the ability to set rates. The only real encouragement for them not gouge, is fear of political back lash AND essentially a government grantee that if they do somehow lose money they will be make whole.

There essentially no controls on the medical tort industry in it.
Nothing was done manage increasing drug costs
The medial device tax, the like one thing that industry might not like, is suspended.
Piles of money were spent hiring the incompetent to build the exchange.

The entire thing is theft all the way up and down.

about a week ago
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Windows Server 2003 Reaches End of Life In July

DarkOx Re:A reason to go with Open Source (156 comments)

Fair enough, but there are some really key differences between the Linux world and that of Windows and even Unix.

You distribution tends to package like 90+ % of the software on the system. The left over 10% is whatever in house app the server is running or 3rd party app you bought. All the libraries it uses, and support software that it uses database engines, etc typically are in the distribution. So the integration details library versions supported version issues are all taken care of for you.

On Windows this absolutely not the case. Things like databases, libraries for document rendering, and just about anything else you can think of is maintained outside the OS distribution. So Windows is where you upgrade and discover UAC totally breaks the version of ${SOFTWARE PACKGE} you have installed or changes to winHTTP cause all the web service calls to fail etc. Even if they mostly are other first party applications like SQL Server or Office. Its also true that its harder to isolate things. If you install something to /opt or /usr/local on a Linux box and those are separate partitions you can have reasonable confidence that blowing away / won't and reloading it from distribution media will leave you with a working app where you left it. Good luck with that on Windows unless you designed the package yourself and avoided the registry and tens of other possible pitfalls.

So again speaking in the general case its easier to go from RHEL 6.x to RHEL 7.x with an in place upgrade, as is true for most other Linux distros; however you do it, let package manager figurout distupdage or re-install a fresh /.

In most of my travels I have not seen 10+ year old Linux versions in production unless its at the same kind of shop that also does not care to patch or be on a supported version of Windows. Even in shops that are good about patch management get their WSUS updates applied etc ( I want to be fair to MS here these rarely if ever break anything) there is still lots of legitimate fear around upgrading an application server between major Windows versions. So in lots of cases Windows boxes tend to stay on whatever release for either the life of the hardware or the life of the app whichever is shorter. Linux boxes tend to be upgraded more frequently.

about a week ago
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Google Thinks the Insurance Industry May Be Ripe For Disruption

DarkOx Re:I'd welcome Google as my carrier (238 comments)

Google provide a la cart pricing.

Now that would be interesting. "You drove for a total of 6 hours and 51 minuets last month and major metro area, using your own vehicle presently valued at $X" You bill based on the risk you exposed us to is $Y.

That could be interesting.

about a week ago
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Google Thinks the Insurance Industry May Be Ripe For Disruption

DarkOx Re:The next battle has started (238 comments)

With some quiet legislative changes to insurable interest [wikipedia.org] regulations, the likes of Goldman Sachs will soon be shorting your grandfather's life

Don't hold your breath there have been lots of folks who have tried this business. My ${relative} was a 30 year live insurance industry veteran. ${gender pronoun} was hired by a start-up as a expert. They had a full cabal of attorneys and folks to put up the capital on the line. The goal was to essentially establish an exchange or brokerage for other peoples life policies.

So for example a company takes out a life insurance policy on their CEO. CEO some years later. What generally happens today is the policy is allowed to lapse and the life insurer gets all the profit or the company is forced to continue servicing the policy for an indefinite period so they can eventually collect the benefit or exchange the policy for some cash value in some cases.

Their idea was you could sell the policy, the liability for paying the premium and the right to be the beneficiary. This way the policy could be sold for its net present value, rather than simply surrendered for its usually lower cash value or allowed to lapse.

Needless to say many trips to Washington were made and long SEC conversations were held and after several years they were forced to give the whole thing up. Insurable interest regulations were only a part of the problem. There are lots legal hurdles around 'who' is allowed to sell an insurance policy. The SEC was less than excited about a part other than the originator or a borker representing them doing it.

about a week ago
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Police Nation-Wide Use Wall-Penetrating Radars To Peer Into Homes

DarkOx Re:With taxes you buy civilization, remember? (290 comments)

Don't worry about your precious tax dollars. I am sure they mostly paid for these things with civilly forfeited assets.

How lucky we are to live in a society where the police can just take money and property from people they don't like on some thin pretext of drug involvement. The best part is since there is expensive overhead associated with review or due process 100% of the revenue can be directly reinvesting in to further civil rights abuses ^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^ additional policing even more greatly reducing tax monies we would other wise have to commit to oppression ^H^H^H^H^H^H law enforcement.

about a week ago
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FBI Seeks To Legally Hack You If You're Connected To TOR Or a VPN

DarkOx Re:God damn Bush and Cheney (382 comments)

The problem is people, that is why we set a government up in the first place; primarily to protect ourselves from each other.

So yes government is the problem. It never can be anything better than a necessary evil. It should be restricted, strangled, starved, and otherwise impeded to the point it can only barely achieve its goal of protecting people from each other, with minimal efficacy. To allow it to get any bigger or more capable than that as we have done not only invites abuse but assures it.

about a week ago
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FBI Seeks To Legally Hack You If You're Connected To TOR Or a VPN

DarkOx Re:work from home users (382 comments)

That's not what's meant by VPN in this context.

"context" don't make me laugh. There is no application of context to modern law. All sides take advantage. The words are stretched and the intents are ignored until the law can practically mean anything the AG wants it to mean that day. "VPN" already has plenty of interpretations in the tech world once the legal world gets hold of it, it is certain to be interpreted as just about anything that isn't a direct essentially the most direct path between hosts available using a plaintext protocol.

If you think otherwise you are crazy, or haven't been paying attention.

about a week ago
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Regular Exercise Not Enough To Make Up For Sitting All Day

DarkOx Like granny always said (348 comments)

If it feels good than it is illegal, immoral, or fattening.

about a week ago
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Microsoft Outlook Users In China Hit With MITM Attack

DarkOx Re: Encryption = same as an envelope for real mai (35 comments)

Where it all breaks down though is you need to get a public key from a trusted source.

For instance with SSL it works.
A)You ask for example.com and get 244.244.244.244 as the DNS result.

B)244.244.244.244 responds and presents a certificate (public key) for example.com

C)You check the certificate for example.com is legit by verification of a signature done with a 3rd party private key and check that with a public key you already have (root CA list). You can now trust 244.244.244.244's claim to be example.com and use that public key to decipher message sent to you with its private key. (which you will use to exchange a symmetric key, but that's getting off topic).

The problem with your example above with e-mail is that Bob has no way to authenticate the original message from Alice. He can't know that the public key he has been sent really from Alice and not his wife spoofing Alice's address because she suspects Alice is a mistress. Bob is how we say 'screwed'.

The only way it can work is if someone counter signs for Alice that Bob already trusts. With SSL and the 3rd party CA system its do able because Companies only have so many Web servers they are willing to pay Verisign or GeoTrust to essentially act as a notary. They won't do this for every employee that wants to send mail, the general public can't be arsed to do it either. So the CA model does not work.

Hence we have the web of trust model. This depends on your belief that most people in that web are responsible about who they 'trust' as authentic sources of keys. It assumes that most senders properly guard their private keys, or even understand they need to guard them and against what. There is zero evidence to suggest the general public has this understanding or capability.

Then there is the problem of web mail. If everyone is just going to hand Google (I am picking on them because of the popularity of GMail) their private keys we are ONE breach away from the entire system crashing down. If you implement some kind of client side encryption with javascript we ware still ONE breach away, someone gets in and replaces the javascript with a malicious one, your client trusts it because well it came from Google's server. It also makes webmail inherently unportable because you have to bring your key with you and what enter it into every untrusted systems all the time?

The GP is right, the problem is key management.

about a week ago
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Could Tizen Be the Next Android?

DarkOx Re:Nope (241 comments)

Yea, people at facebook.

about a week ago

Submissions

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NSA not Assad brought down Internet in Syria

DarkOx DarkOx writes  |  about 5 months ago

DarkOx (621550) writes "In his most recent interview with Wired Edward Snowden makes the claim that in 2012, the NSAâ(TM)s TAO hacking group was attempting to install surveillance malware when it accidentally brought down a crucial router at a Syrian Internet service provider, and the nation's Internet connectivity with it.

The NSA allowd the public to blame the Assad regime, while others within the NSA apparently considered pointing the finger at Israel for the botched intrusion. This revelation raises even more questions about the legality of the NSA actions, as they would seem to be very similar to electronic atacks other officials have suggested the USA would consider acts of war if used against infrastructure based in the USA.

Could the reckless behavior by the NSA cause our nation to be drawn into war?"

Link to Original Source
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Anonymous Vows to Destroy Facebook

DarkOx DarkOx writes  |  more than 3 years ago

DarkOx (621550) writes "Anonymous has vowed to destroy Facebook on November 5th (which should ring a bell).

Citing privacy concerns and the difficulty involved in deleting a Facebook account.

From: Anonymous posting:
Attention citizens of the world,
We wish to get your attention, hoping you heed the warnings as follows:
Your medium of communication you all so dearly adore will be destroyed. If you are a willing hacktivist or a guy who just wants to protect the freedom of information then join the cause and kill facebook for the sake of your own privacy."

Link to Original Source
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Slackware.com is gone

DarkOx DarkOx writes  |  about 4 years ago

DarkOx (621550) writes "It appears the domain registration of Slackware.com the oldest commerical GNU/Linux distributions has expired. Is this a simple oversite on the part of Slackware's maintainer Patrick Volkerdi or is this a diliberate retirement of many peoples favorite distribution?"
Link to Original Source
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Jessica Watson sets sail

DarkOx DarkOx writes  |  more than 5 years ago

DarkOx (621550) writes "Jessica Watson has begun her round the world voyage, if successful she will be the youngest person, age 16, to circumnavigate the globe by sail unassisted and non-stop.

She will 23,000 nautical miles (about 38,000 kilometres), departing and returning to Sydney as required to set the record. This will be a journey lasting around 240 days, during which she may not acquire any outside supplies or receive any assistance with repairs.

She will have internet access, e-mail, and her position will be continuously tracked and monitored. This is a pretty high tech undertaking both in the electronics sense and as in sailing kit. Her yacht is a S&S (Sparkman and Stephens) 34 a boat that has successfully been used in other solo circumnavigation bids.

Much more information can be found at her website: http://www.jessicawatson.com.au/"

Link to Original Source

Journals

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Hypocrisy and the Contraception debate

DarkOx DarkOx writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Since apparently we have to decide the future of American politics around this issue of whether insurers should be forced to offer contraceptives and pharmacies be forced to carry them the freedom or religion question again comes to the forefront.

The progressive propaganda machine is out in full force trying to accuse conservatives of forcing their religion on others and or trying to sell us all on the idea that these measures are in some way protecting them from the tyrannical religious views of the minority. The sad part is its working in that public is actually entertaining the idea this has anything to do with religion. It may be to an extent but if is than the conservatives as usual have the more supportable position even if most of those would be ïïSantorum votes and the candidate himself are blind to it.

All of these âoeprogressivesâ who see their boy Obama as a hero pushing common sense over the religious right, are as much the fools they like to make the Santorum supporters out to be or the worst kind of hypocrite. I personally suspect its pretty even mix of both; frequently found in the same individuals. Almost any of them would be willing to argue that âoefreedom of religionâ means freedom from religion and Iâ(TM)d agree. It follows though that âoefreedom of associationâ its in that same amendment, should also mean freedom from association. That means as an individual, or private business, I should have the right to disassociate myself form any person or group of people I chose for any reason, however stupid. This is the view I take as libertarian. Its incumbent upon me to not pick stupid reasons but if I do; well to damn bad right? So if an employer, insurance agency or pharmacy does not want the sort of customer or employee that interested in contraception coverage well that ought to be allowed. So toss out all your civil rights acts, quota laws, and similar non-egalitarian derk.

The Supreme Court of the United States disagrees with me; partially. The have held you can only exclude members from your group if their presence would make it difficult to express you view point. Clearly in the case of Catholic organizations who have the view point that contraception is wrong, would have a problem espousing that viewpoint while having a membership with the expectation they are going to pay for it. So their covered but the pharmacy that does not want to carry Plan B, they are not a religious organization, the are not pushing an agenda other than make buck; so they canâ(TM)t just dissociate themselves from a certain group of customers right? Well I guess you got me there, or do you? I say the the Supreme Court is wrong. I say this because if the the freedom of associate is in fact not freedom from association than its terribly inconsistent to take the view freedom of religion is.

If your not forcing people to violate the tenants of their own faith with say biblical-y inspired laws than those must be okay, as that would be consistent with the Courts rulings on association. Sorry Atheists if the Christians want to hang the Ten Commandments over the door and start the school day with a prayer I guess you must let them. You canâ(TM)t have it both ways, well not and be honest anyway. Lets face it honesty and integrity have never really been part of the progressive agenda though have they?

  hmm some other thoughts on the subject.

What about the basic freedom reserved for the states and the people, you know ALL the ones not enumerated elsewhere in the Constitution. Like say deciding what to stock in your store. If a pharmacy has to carry Plan B, does my auto mechanic have to stock parts for my thirty year old import? Does JC Penny have to have beige pants in a thirty-one inch waste in stock at all times? Where is line? Clearly its totally against the character of this nation for any central governing body to be dictating what a retail operation has on their shelves, at least I hope that is still true!

Finally can we just dispense with the totally ridiculous notion that contraceptive drugs are âoenecessary for womenâ(TM)s health.â Clearly when prescribed for âoecontraceptive useâ they are not. Effective inexpensive contraception for men and women is available at just about every gas station, drug store, and many a public rest room across this country. If you really canâ(TM)t of any of it for whatever reason you could just keep your pants on. Sure it might ruin a Saturday night but it wonâ(TM)t kill you. I would be willing to entertain an argument that these medications might be necessary when prescribed as they frequently are for other health reasons. Doing so than places it on the doctor writing the prescription and their professional integrity when they attest to why they are doing it. Seems like a reasonable compromise. This simply is not an equal protection issue. Its just not.

Lets face it contraception is NOT specifically a womenâ(TM)s issue unless fathers have no obligation or rights to the consequences of not using it. Oh wait nobody is happy with that idea? Thought not.

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