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Comments

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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

DaveAtFraud Re:Bingo! (810 comments)

... I come down on the systemd side when I want my laptop to correctly connect to the appropriate WiFi network (but only if not connected to a wired network).

The NetworkManager is written by literally the same people who work on the SystemD.

If it hadn't worked before, why you think it would work afterwards?

It works better than the alternative for managing dynamic network connections. That isn't saying much since the alternative is doing it manually or with handcrafted shell scripts.

I usually call it NetworkMangler.

Cheers,
Dave

about a week ago
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Choose Your Side On the Linux Divide

DaveAtFraud Bingo! (810 comments)

I was looking for an appropriate thread to make the same suggestion. I come down on the side of the sysvinit people when it comes to servers and other stable installations. OTH, I come down on the systemd side when I want my laptop to correctly connect to the appropriate WiFi network (but only if not connected to a wired network). It really makes sense to support both. Stability, reliability and simplicity for the server folks and something more flexible for desktops and laptops.

Cheers,
Dave

about a week ago
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Long-Wave Radar Can Take the Stealth From Stealth Technology

DaveAtFraud Re:Duped article and not insightful (275 comments)

Definitely well known for a long time. I remember seeing an article around 1990 about one of the radar systems that I worked on in the mid-1980s as being able to track the B-2. Both systems were over the horizon radars (very long wave length; antenna arrays stretching for a mile or so). Good tracking accuracy if you looked at it as a percentage of the range but the minimum range was like 400-500 miles (not classified; characteristic of the radar) so even a 1% accuracy means at best a location within 4 or 5 miles. Great for early warning but not useful for targeting. Also, not something that can be made mobile; let alone stuffed into an interceptor.

Cheers,
Dave

about three weeks ago
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Favorite "Go!" Phrase?

DaveAtFraud Reailty (701 comments)

"... you are cleared for take off."

Can't beat the rush even if your ride is just a little Cessna or Piper.

Cheers,
Dave

about a month and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Many Employees Does Microsoft Really Need?

DaveAtFraud Re:At least 1 less than they currently have (272 comments)

Definitely worth his severance to get him out of Nokia and back to Microsoft. Says a lot when a company's stock goes up on news that the CEO is leaving. Now if he could only have the same level of success at Microsoft as he had at Nokia.

Cheers,
Dave

about a month and a half ago
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Ask Slashdot: How Many Employees Does Microsoft Really Need?

DaveAtFraud Buzzword Bingo. (272 comments)

BINGO!!!!!!!

I win. Too bad a bunch of ex-Nokia folks and Microsofties had to lose though.

Cheers,
Dave

about a month and a half ago
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Predicting a Future Free of Dollar Bills

DaveAtFraud As the saying goes (753 comments)

In $GOD we trust. All others must pay cash.

(your choice as to how to define $GOD)

Cheers,
Dave

about a month and a half ago
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The Lovelace Test Is Better Than the Turing Test At Detecting AI

DaveAtFraud Re:Lovelace? (285 comments)

...

The less humans on this planet, the better.

Feel free to exit at any time to help mitigate the problem. I plan on staying around as long as possible if for no other reason than just to piss off misanthrops like you.

Cheers,
Dave

about 2 months ago
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The Lovelace Test Is Better Than the Turing Test At Detecting AI

DaveAtFraud Re:Lovelace? (285 comments)

Maybe they mean the "Linda Lovelace" test?

Unfortunately, she's dead. Doesn't take much intelligence to be dead.

Cheers,
Dave

about 2 months ago
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My most recent energy-saving bulbs last ...

DaveAtFraud Most recent bulbs still in package (278 comments)

I've had a few of my older CFLs fail though but generally only after quite a few years. Duty cycle makes a huge difference. I just replaced two incandescent bulbs that were supplied by our builder almost twenty years ago. We just don't use those particular lights very often. I only wish I'd bought more cheap, incandescent bulbs before they were outlawed since they are fine for lights that are rarely used.

Cheers,
Dave

about 2 months ago
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I suffer from jet lag ...

DaveAtFraud Depends on direction of travel (163 comments)

I have little or no trouble with jet lag when I fly west. I have a lot of trouble when I fly east unless the flight is far enough that the jump is a complete reset. I'm in Colorado and flying to the eastern time zone is the pits. Flying to Europe on the other hand is not so bad.

That flying west isn't so bad is no surprise. I'm a night person so staying up a couple of hours and then sleeping in a couple of hours is my prefered schedule. Getting up early even for the shift to daylight savings time usually kicks my butt for a week or more and I don't even get a change of scenery.

Cheers,
Dave

about 2 months ago
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X Window System Turns 30 Years Old

DaveAtFraud X on HP-UX in 1988 (204 comments)

Worked OK then (more than a few memory leaks). Works much better now.

Kind of amusing the people who want to get rid of it just because it's old. Especially amusing are the people who seem to think they could re-write it in a week. Delusional but amusing.

Cheers,
Dave

about 2 months ago
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Amazon's 3D Smartphone As a (Useful) Gimmick

DaveAtFraud Re:Been there. Done that. (68 comments)

When I view the stereoscope images off camera, they "don't match" with regard to color. Just a slightly different hue but very noticeable. A 2D shot of the same scene matches neither of the stereoscope pair and matches the "real" colors.

Stereoscpic photography has been around for a long time. It just takes shooting the same scene twice but from two slightly different points. My family at one time had a 35mm film camera that had two lenses,etc and could be used to take stereoscopic photograph pairs. You needed a special viewer to view them to get the 3D effect and you burned twice as much film but it was really cool. The lenses were about as far apart as an adult's eyes.

How far apart were the levses on your 3D EVO? The twin lenses on the Thrill are only maybe half an inch apart. Don't know if LG had to resort to some other trickery to get 3D effects with the lenses that close.

Cheers,
Dave

about 3 months ago
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Amazon's 3D Smartphone As a (Useful) Gimmick

DaveAtFraud Been there. Done that. (68 comments)

My old phone is an LG Thrill. Geat phone when it was released. Had a 3D camera so you could take 3D pictures. Reasonable 3D rendering ON THE PHONE. That's the problem. You could take 3D pictures but only people with another LG Thrill could view them in 3D. You couldn't even share just one of the two images from the stereoscopic image since neither image was actually "correct" when viewed alone. You had to view the 3D images on an LG Thrill. Dumb.

Oh yeah. It also had the ability to play 3D games. I don't play games so that was another useless feature. Also, I'm sorry but the idea behind 3D movies, games, what have you is to make the experience "immersive". It's really hard to feel immersed when you have this little teeny, tiny smartphone screen. Lifesized 3D on a wall sized 4K screen is immersive.

Cheers,
Dave

about 3 months ago
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Federal Court Pulls Plug On Porn Copyright Shakedown

DaveAtFraud Re:The US needs a loser-pays legal system (136 comments)

I stay fit and will probably get a concealed carry permit at some point. Works for me. I also avoid bad neighborhoods.

Translation for the current discussion: If you're a corporation, straighten up and fly right. The best way to avoid being sued is to not do anything that would attract a law suit. Likewise, maintain/retain a legal team that is notoriously good (IBM and MoFo come to mind: the Nazgul eviserated the SCO legal team in a way that sends a loud and clear message of "don't mess with my client").

Cheers,
Dave

about 3 months ago
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Which desktop environment do you like the best?

DaveAtFraud Re:GNOME 2, then 3. (611 comments)

Try mate, it is a fork of gnome 2.

Been happy with Xfce on the laptop. It's an old single core 64 bit Athlon CPU with 1GB of RAM so Xfce is a good match for it (light weight). It's old but sufficient when I travel to check e-mail, open a ssh session back to the server at the house, etc. I'll try mate on something a little beefier.

Cheers,
Dave

about 3 months ago
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Federal Court Pulls Plug On Porn Copyright Shakedown

DaveAtFraud Re:The US needs a loser-pays legal system (136 comments)

The defedant always has the option of counter-suing the plantif. They can also file a complaint to the local bar association asserting barratry against the plantif's lawyers.

Cheers,
Dave

about 3 months ago
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Federal Court Pulls Plug On Porn Copyright Shakedown

DaveAtFraud Re:The US needs a loser-pays legal system (136 comments)

Have to agree. At least the communists had a philosophically consistent political platform. It may have been based on a failed belief system (dialectic materialism) that had no basis in reality but at least it flowed fairly consistently from there. Democrats on the other hand seem to only be concerned with getting re-elected and watching out for the causes supported by their left wing, limousine liberal benefactors. Whitness Harry Reid's crass behavior when it came to patent reform, the recent "crackdown" on the NSA, etc.

There really is a difference. Glad you pointed that out.

Cheers,
Dave

about 3 months ago

Submissions

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Favorite way to add capsaicin to a dish:

DaveAtFraud DaveAtFraud writes  |  about 2 years ago

DaveAtFraud writes "Fresh chilis
Dried chilis
Preserved chilis/chili sauce
Mild hot sauce
Medium hot sauce
Natural but very hot sauce
Extreme hot sauce
Something else that I'll explain
Cowboyneal perfectly spices all of my food"
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Tanya Anderson Sue RIAA for Malicious Prosecution

DaveAtFraud DaveAtFraud writes  |  more than 7 years ago

DaveAtFraud writes "Groklaw has the scoop. Tanya Anderson, the single mother from Oregon previously sued by the RIAA (the case was dropped by the RIAA just before losing as a summary judgement), is suing the RIAA and their hired snoop Safenet (Formerly known as MediaSentry) for malicious prosecution. She is asserting claims under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act and the RICO Act, the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organization Act. One of the Groklaw readers has already picked up that she is seeking to have the RIAA forfeit the copyrights in question as part of the settlement. PJ has the full story and pithy analysis."
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DaveAtFraud DaveAtFraud writes  |  more than 7 years ago

DaveAtFraud writes "Infoworld has an article about a German company that is offering music downloads without DRM. Akuma uses a digital watermark technique invented by the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits to trace and prosecute only people who illegally upload music. From TFA: "The watermark technology makes slight changes to the data in sound files, such as a higher volume intensity in a tiny part of a song, that are undetectable by even the best trained ears, according to Fraunhofer researchers. However, if unauthorized copies of a download turn up on, for example, peer-to-peer file sharing networks, the watermark allows Akuma to identify the purchaser of a file and take action against them." This means the end user can make as many copies as they want and can even share copies with very trusted friends. The only flaw I can see is what happens if someone loses their music player and their watermarked music gets uploaded?"

Journals

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Pissant A.C. criticism

DaveAtFraud DaveAtFraud writes  |  about a year ago

Some pissant A.C. seems to think it is his (or her) job to insist that I not "sign" my posts the way I always have. Why would anyone listen to criticism from a pissant A.C?

Cheers,
Dave

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Response to signature criticism

DaveAtFraud DaveAtFraud writes  |  more than 6 years ago I found this citation in one of columns in today's Rocky interesting:

"To date, other Western countries have been more successful in covering all citizens at a lower per capita cost, but they have done so only by limiting the availability of high-technology medicine." So writes former Colorado governor Richard Lamm and co-author Robert Blank in their recent book, Condition Critical. A New Moral Vision for Health Care. And these guys are on Polis' side of the single payer debate.

"Every single payer health system has at its core some form of health-care rationing, including strict limits on expensive care, such as organ transplants, chemotherapy and bone marrow transplants, and long waiting lines for elective surgeries." Lammand Blank honestly acknowledge.

The columnist pointed out that such limits and rationing don't apply to the very rich like Polis, who can afford to go outside the system for care. Sounds like my signature.

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