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Comments

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I expect to retire ...

DaveAtFraud Different definition of "retire" (267 comments)

I prefer to think of retirement as when I don't need to work in order to be able to afford a comfortable lifestyle. Approaching that point now. A couple more good years from the stock market and work becomes optional; not necessary. On the other hand, I actually enjoy doing software development and may keep working for quite some time after I "retire." The only obstacle I see is that a lot of managers can't deal with having someone working for them who doesn't desperately need the job and is therefore not willing to be treated like s**t.

Cheers,
Dave

3 days ago
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How 'DevOps' Is Killing the Developer

DaveAtFraud Re:Nothing new here (225 comments)

Seen this many many times before. Cheap companies that have lots of developers and are too cheap to hire experienced admins... or an IT shop that thinks they can have the IT guys program instead of hiring proper developers. "hey, you work with computers, you guys can all do the same stuff, right?" Wrong.

While I have known developers that can sysadmin, and admins that can program... they are the exception not the rule. Quality suffers when you force people into jobs they are not qualified for. Companies know this, and they simply don't care as long as the managers think they are saving money.

If you think the sysadmin who can program or the programmer who can admin a system is bad, you should have seen what happened when they gave Visual Basic to a subject matter expert (SME) and said, "You can program!" Agggghhhhhh!!!!!!!!

Cheers,
Dave

5 days ago
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The Case For a Safer Smartphone

DaveAtFraud Re:We'll need more 911 operators (184 comments)

Are you sure they're actually talking? I figured they were playing Angry Birds/Candy Crush.

They're talking unless their playing the game using their left facial cheek instead of their fingers. Not sure how many butt dial the games with their left butt cheek.

Cheers,
Dave

5 days ago
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The Case For a Safer Smartphone

DaveAtFraud Re:We'll need more 911 operators (184 comments)

So people do still buy phones to make calls? I thought it was all about the "smart" stuff nowadays. Or was that the actual joke? :)

I take it that you don't drive very much. Still lots of people yakking away on their cell phone and oblivious to traffic around them. I especially like the ones who are so wrapped up in their conversation that they don't notice the light has changed and glare at you if you honk your horn at them with a look of "Can't you see I'm busy with my conversation!" There's a reason why a lot people have a bumper sticker that says, "Shut up, hang up and drive."

about a week ago
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The Case For a Safer Smartphone

DaveAtFraud We'll need more 911 operators (184 comments)

911 Operator: "911. What's your emergency?"

Sobbing voice: "I just can't take it anymore. I need someone to talk to."

911 Operator: "That's OK ma'am. I'm here to talk to you. What's your location?"

Simpering voice: "I'm stuck in traffic on the intersate. It seems like hours since I talked to anyone and my phone won't let me call anyone but you."

911 Operator: "You'll be fine ma'am. We're trained to deal with cell phone withdrawl victims. A nice highway patrol officer is on his way to talk to you in person. How long have it been since you made a phone call ma'am?"

Anguished response: "I don't know. I left the office at 5:00 and talked to BFF until I got in my car but the phone dropped the call as soon as I started the engine. What time is it now?"

911 Operator: "It's now 5:15 you poor dear. You've been without cell phone contact for at least 10 minutes. I'll send the paramedics as well as the highway patrol."

about a week ago
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I prefer my peppers ...

DaveAtFraud Re:Never drink water! (285 comments)

Thanks for the chemistry lesson. I've always been pretty successful with beer (not wine). Wasn't sure whether it was the lower acidity or lack of carbonation. Folks who pass on alcoholic drinks say that sodas work for them. Thoughts?

Sounds like a good reason to switch to gin and tonnic the next time I'm out for Indian food.

Cheers,
Dave

about three weeks ago
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I prefer my peppers ...

DaveAtFraud Re:Never drink water! (285 comments)

Milk is the only truly instant fix if your mouth is burning up. Seriously, none of those other things you mentioned actually work very well.

I don't know. A sufficient quantity of beer seems to either clear the hot or dull the pain. Either result works for me.

Cheers,
Dave

about three weeks ago
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I prefer my peppers ...

DaveAtFraud Never drink water! (285 comments)

Water is one of the WORST things you can have if you find food to be too hot. Capsaician is an oily substance (long carbon chain). By drinking water you spread the oil and that makes it seem even hotten. Best slternatives are things that absorb the capsaician such as starcy foods like bread, rice or potatoes or acidic beverages like fruit juices, beer, etc. that disolve the oil. I've heard milk also works but somehow milk and spicy food doesn't sound good to me.

One of the things that makes hot "buffalo wings" so hot is chicken wings are fatty so the fat from the chicken wings coats your mouth and holds the capsaician there. I like hot spicy food but found that out the hard way when I tried the hottest wings on the menu at a Buffalo Wild Wings. Tasted good initially but then the heat just stayed in my mouth. Only time I haven't been able to finish something because it was too hot.

Cheers,
Dave

about a month ago
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A Call For Rollbacks To Previous Versions of Software

DaveAtFraud Re:You left out... (199 comments)

Packages A and B both depend on shared library C. A critical bug is discovered in package A that requires a change to library C. Package B releases an update to stay compatible with library C. It turns out that the update to B doesn't work. There is no way to revert B to the previous version since this also requires reverting library C and package A to the version with the critical bug.

This sort of thing is why commercial apps try to avoid using system shared libraries where practical. The issue is that you just never know what sort of crappy system you're going to be dropped into. Bundling as much as you can limits the pain a lot, and the cost is just space (and time when downloading, if relevant).

Of course, if nobody ever shipped buggy updates and never broke backward compatibility, you wouldn't need this sort of thing. But on Planet Earth... <sigh>

I still remember the days of "DLL hell" when everyone shipping Windows products included their own version of various, supposedly shared DLLs. The problem was the first one loaded was expected to work with the others which didn't happen since it didn't have the right customizations. Yeah, that approach worked really well.

The problem with avoiding shared libraries is that the onus for keeping up with updates to the shared libraries transfers to the application developer. You still run into the same problem as my example; just the immediate consequences are hidden. If "B" builds in or statically links to an old version of the library, there is still the possibility that there will be a critical update to the library and it's now up to the application developer to re-build it in, test the new build and release the update. It's possible that the critical bug is in a part of a library their application doesn't use but we're now relying on the application developer to make that determination.

Cheers,
Dave

about a month ago
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A Call For Rollbacks To Previous Versions of Software

DaveAtFraud You left out... (199 comments)

Shared dependencies:

Packages A and B both depend on shared library C. A critical bug is discovered in package A that requires a change to library C. Package B releases an update to stay compatible with library C. It turns out that the update to B doesn't work. There is no way to revert B to the previous version since this also requires reverting library C and package A to the version with the critical bug.

Testing:

Each old reversion point for any sort of shared library means that every package that is dependent on that library has to be fully tested with each version of the shared library. Add in multiple shared libraries and the test case tree becomes very bushy since all permutations and combinations of the shared libraries must be tested.

Cheers,
Dave

about a month ago
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Church Committee Members Say New Group Needed To Watch NSA

DaveAtFraud Who here actually remembers the Church committee? (143 comments)

Who else on /. (besides me) remembers the Church Committee hearings? Tricky Dicky? The Saturday Night Massacre?

Cheers,
Dave

about a month ago
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New Facial Recognition Software May Detect Looming Road Rage

DaveAtFraud Re:Not that much more dystopian... (133 comments)

Probably they settle for the eye tracking. Sensing distraction and sleepiness would prevent a lot of accidents. The car would alarm the driver or gently park by itself.

Something like that (my emphasis in bold) would make it impossible for most guys to get anywhere in a car in most beach cities. Even worse, I can hear my wife now saying, "Would you keep your eyes on the road! We can't get there if the car parks itself every time some eye candy in a bikini is in view."

Cheers,
Dave

about a month ago
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Environmentalists Propose $50 Billion Buyout of Coal Industry - To Shut It Down

DaveAtFraud Re:Let me know if you find it (712 comments)

I liked the way Obama blocked building the keystone pipeline to supposedly placate the greeny types. So instead of shipping the Bracken crude in a fairly non-polluting pipeline, we have trains pulling it to where it can be processed and polluting and sometimes exploding along the way. Same amount of oil gets burned plus you have the pollution from the trains plus a few exploding trains. Real enviromentalism in practice.

Cheers,
Dave

about a month ago
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Environmentalists Propose $50 Billion Buyout of Coal Industry - To Shut It Down

DaveAtFraud Re:Let me know if you find it (712 comments)

No. First you buy the coal stocks and then, after the stock price runs up from the artificial demand created by this goofy scheme to buy out all of coal companies, you sell the coal stocks and then buy natural gas stocks. The coal stocks will go up as soon as the scheme starts buying. Natural gas stocks won't go up that much until the scheme actually starts limiting the coal supply.

My bet is that there are enough unexploited coal deposits that this scheme will mainly result in a bunch of coal mining start ups and will never seriously impact the supply of coal. Same thing happened when Standard Oil tried to create an oil monopoly back in the 19th century. Lots of people got rich starting and selling oil companies.

Cheers,
Dave

about a month ago
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Environmentalists Propose $50 Billion Buyout of Coal Industry - To Shut It Down

DaveAtFraud Re:Not so much (712 comments)

There is no such thing as economic security. I recognize that and work for a society that lets me keep what I earn.

Your idea of economic security comes at my expense with me at the wrong end of the tax collector's gun. All of the mass murders of the 20th century (Stalin, Mao, Pol Pot, etc.) promised economic security if only their subjects gave them enough power and relinquished their real liberty. You know. The old, "From each according to his abilities to each according to his needs." If those are your idea of "civilized standards", I'll pass.

Cheers,
Dave

about a month ago
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Environmentalists Propose $50 Billion Buyout of Coal Industry - To Shut It Down

DaveAtFraud Re:This is what Thatcher was good at (712 comments)

No, Thatcher and Reagan got it the most wrong of all. Not as wrong as Mao, but incredibly wrong by liberal standards.

Fixed that for you. You seem to assume that your liberal leanings are Western standards. Not.

Cheers,
Dave

about a month ago
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Environmentalists Propose $50 Billion Buyout of Coal Industry - To Shut It Down

DaveAtFraud Re:What about the rail unions who may stop this (712 comments)

And how many "modern" coal fired plants are being built? Not many due to pollution limits. On the other hand, there are lots of old coal fired plants that were located close to population centers. I usually pass a couple of coal trains each day hauling Wyoming coal down to Colorado Springs (where I work) and points south like Pueblo and on into New Mexico. Quite a few only make it as far as Denver. Not many power plants up near the mines in Wyoming (also not many people).

Another funny thing about that. Recently had a local political flap about plans to build some new high tension transmission lines where there hadn't been any before. You should have heard the outcry against building "ugly power lines". Nobody seems to notice a couple more coal trains on the same tracks though.

Other point... That's "several million new tons of domestic coal". You apparently missed the "new". Can't find a number for how much domestic coal they haul but they ship about 30 to 35 million tons a year for export. Just one railroad.

Cheers,
Dave

about a month ago
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Environmentalists Propose $50 Billion Buyout of Coal Industry - To Shut It Down

DaveAtFraud Re:This is what Thatcher was good at (712 comments)

Are you still dancing on that woman's grave? Jeez, conservatives didn't celebrate this much when Joseph Freaking Stalin died.

Didn't Hate Week sate your hatred? You know, the week after she died when you had hate parades to show just how much you hated her. No, seriously, this really happened. Hate parades.

Liberals hate conservatives but they REALLY hate conservatives like Thatcher and Reagan who got it right. Conservatives like Bush Jr. and Palin are easy targets and ad hominem attacks that discredit the person rather than the ideas. Thatcher and Reagan put their ideas into operation and both countries benefited. That's what really pisses off the liberals. They'd rather have the country going down a rat hole the way GB was under Labour governments than admit a conservative like Thatcher was right.

Cheers,
Dave

about a month ago
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Environmentalists Propose $50 Billion Buyout of Coal Industry - To Shut It Down

DaveAtFraud Re:What about the rail unions who may stop this (712 comments)

Most remaining coal plants are, more or less, at the mine. The energy is 'shipped' down a transmission line.

Bzzzzzzzzttttttttt Wrong.

From a CSX press release today (13 March 2014):

"The company said the reduced operations will be partly offset by higher demand for coal to warm homes and businesses, as it carried "several million new tons of domestic coal" during the quarter."

Other railroads such as Norfolk Southern, Union Pacific and BNSF have all said about the same thing. There is an engineering tradeoff between transportation costs of coal (surprisingly cheap) and transmission losses. The solution seems to be to ship the coal to someplace relatively close to where the power will be needed.

Cheers,
Dave

about a month ago

Submissions

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Favorite way to add capsaicin to a dish:

DaveAtFraud DaveAtFraud writes  |  about a year and a half ago

DaveAtFraud writes "Fresh chilis
Dried chilis
Preserved chilis/chili sauce
Mild hot sauce
Medium hot sauce
Natural but very hot sauce
Extreme hot sauce
Something else that I'll explain
Cowboyneal perfectly spices all of my food"
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Tanya Anderson Sue RIAA for Malicious Prosecution

DaveAtFraud DaveAtFraud writes  |  more than 6 years ago

DaveAtFraud writes "Groklaw has the scoop. Tanya Anderson, the single mother from Oregon previously sued by the RIAA (the case was dropped by the RIAA just before losing as a summary judgement), is suing the RIAA and their hired snoop Safenet (Formerly known as MediaSentry) for malicious prosecution. She is asserting claims under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act and the RICO Act, the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organization Act. One of the Groklaw readers has already picked up that she is seeking to have the RIAA forfeit the copyrights in question as part of the settlement. PJ has the full story and pithy analysis."
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DaveAtFraud DaveAtFraud writes  |  more than 7 years ago

DaveAtFraud writes "Infoworld has an article about a German company that is offering music downloads without DRM. Akuma uses a digital watermark technique invented by the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits to trace and prosecute only people who illegally upload music. From TFA: "The watermark technology makes slight changes to the data in sound files, such as a higher volume intensity in a tiny part of a song, that are undetectable by even the best trained ears, according to Fraunhofer researchers. However, if unauthorized copies of a download turn up on, for example, peer-to-peer file sharing networks, the watermark allows Akuma to identify the purchaser of a file and take action against them." This means the end user can make as many copies as they want and can even share copies with very trusted friends. The only flaw I can see is what happens if someone loses their music player and their watermarked music gets uploaded?"

Journals

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Pissant A.C. criticism

DaveAtFraud DaveAtFraud writes  |  about a year ago

Some pissant A.C. seems to think it is his (or her) job to insist that I not "sign" my posts the way I always have. Why would anyone listen to criticism from a pissant A.C?

Cheers,
Dave

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Response to signature criticism

DaveAtFraud DaveAtFraud writes  |  more than 6 years ago I found this citation in one of columns in today's Rocky interesting:

"To date, other Western countries have been more successful in covering all citizens at a lower per capita cost, but they have done so only by limiting the availability of high-technology medicine." So writes former Colorado governor Richard Lamm and co-author Robert Blank in their recent book, Condition Critical. A New Moral Vision for Health Care. And these guys are on Polis' side of the single payer debate.

"Every single payer health system has at its core some form of health-care rationing, including strict limits on expensive care, such as organ transplants, chemotherapy and bone marrow transplants, and long waiting lines for elective surgeries." Lammand Blank honestly acknowledge.

The columnist pointed out that such limits and rationing don't apply to the very rich like Polis, who can afford to go outside the system for care. Sounds like my signature.

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