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Comments

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Rising Sea Levels Uncover Japanese War Dead In Marshall Islands

Derling Whirvish Re:Faster than the global average? (182 comments)

This manifests most discernably in the relatively huge sea level differences between the pacific side the Panama canal and the Atlantic side.

There isn't a "huge" difference. It's a matter of a few inches (eight I think on average). It's mostly as a result of wind and current pushing the water up on the Pacific side as the prevailing winds there blow onshore on the Pacific side and offshore on the Atlantic side.

about 3 months ago
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Rising Sea Levels Uncover Japanese War Dead In Marshall Islands

Derling Whirvish Re:Faster than the global average? (182 comments)

I just want to point out that many people learn at an early age that the Panama canal uses locks to raise and lower ships passing through, and that these are absolutely necessary because the sea levels on the two ends are different.

WTF? You make this statement in a post where you're trying to make someone else seem uneducated and unknowledgeable? The sea levels on the two ends are not different. They are the same. The locks are there because the water in the canal comes from rivers that feed into it and the canal is not at sea level the whole way across-- it rises to cross the terrain. Incoming river water fills the locks to raise the ships and it is released when the locks are drained to lower the ships.

about 3 months ago
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VA Supreme Court: Michael Mann Needn't Turn Over All His Email

Derling Whirvish Re:All publicly funded research needs public relea (348 comments)

Secondly, it does not cover any communication where the sender or receiver has an expectation of privacy. If he is emailing someone who is not being paid to work on that particular project, such as a graduate student or another person in his field or department, that information is not going to be covered by the FOIA as it violates the expectation of privacy of the person outside the project sending or receiving the email, unless the person is specifically informed that their email may be subject to public disclosure.

His lawyers did not make a privacy argument. The made a "proprietary information" argument.

about 4 months ago
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VA Supreme Court: Michael Mann Needn't Turn Over All His Email

Derling Whirvish Re:All publicly funded research needs public relea (348 comments)

IIUC, his lawyers requested that certain materials not be produced, and in doing so quoted a section of the state law which exhempted a particular category of material from being required to be produced. If you don't like the phrasing, talk to the people who wrote the law. His lawyers were just doing their job, and making it easy for the judge.

His lawyers cannot quote the part of the law dealing with a particular category of material that is allowed to be suppressed and use it to suppress a different category altogether that is not exempted from disclosure. The phrasing has nothing to do with it if they are ignoring the statutory language of the law to begin with.

about 4 months ago
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VA Supreme Court: Michael Mann Needn't Turn Over All His Email

Derling Whirvish Re:All publicly funded research needs public relea (348 comments)

So if he texts, "I'm sorry I am not going to be in for work today I am receiving medical treatment from my mental health provider," that should be public records?

If he emails, "I am sorry Mrs. Channing, but there is no work you can do in Physics 102 to avoid a failing grade," that should be public record?

Releasing the first email would be a violation of federal law (respecting medical confidentiality) and the second one would likely violate State law or university code on student confidentiality.

The Supreme Court has ruled that American citizens have a reasonable expectation that the contents of their email will be kept private, just like their phone conversations.

But he didn't make that argument -- the argument that some of the emails should be withheld because they have private information. He made the argument that emails discussing the data relating to climate models should be withheld because they contain proprietary information that could cause the university to be less competitive with other universities in obtaining funding. That's completely different. And if he made the argument you made I might agree with him, but he made a different argument that I disagree with.

about 4 months ago
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Mozilla CEO Firestorm Likely Violated California Law

Derling Whirvish Re:I see no violation here... (1116 comments)

Dalton Trumbo never recanted either. I guess it was OK to blacklist him then.

about 5 months ago
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Will Cameras Replace Sideview Mirrors On Cars In 2018?

Derling Whirvish Re:Why stop there? (496 comments)

When the power drops, and I need to get across X lanes of traffic to the breakdown lane, I'll be glad to have a mirror.

A driver certainly would want to be encased inside a protective shell if the windshield were replaced with a monitor blocking the view and bringing a whole new meaning to BSOD.

Of course once self-driving cars hit the successive generations/versions, all bets are off.

The Apollo space capsule didn't have a glass windshield up front and the astronauts managed to get all the way to the moon and back without a BSOD killing them. I think I can handle a trip to my local Piggly Wiggly without one.

about 5 months ago
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Will Cameras Replace Sideview Mirrors On Cars In 2018?

Derling Whirvish Re:Why stop there? (496 comments)

What about ditching the windshield and replacing it with a 4k HD screen? Then you can embed the driver lower-down and deep inside a protective hardened shell. A no-glass car all around.

Then how about ditching the wheels, and just simulate movement on the 4K screen. You could drive as fast you want in perfect safety.

That's more or less what I already do with Amazon. I have ditched the car altogether for most shopping trips and replaced it with a virtual shopping center that has almost everything I need right there on my 24" computer monitor.

about 5 months ago
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Will Cameras Replace Sideview Mirrors On Cars In 2018?

Derling Whirvish Submarines (496 comments)

I assume submarines have replaced the captain looking thru the periscope with his eyes to a camera mounted there and a Star-Trek-style viewscreen viewable to everyone in the control room. If they haven't they should. You can add infrared sensors and stuff to the video. And no more red light so as to not damage the captain's night vision.

about 5 months ago
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Will Cameras Replace Sideview Mirrors On Cars In 2018?

Derling Whirvish What about aircraft? (496 comments)

I always wondered why aircraft don't have embedded cameras all around. One to observe the landing gear, one pointed at the tail rudder, one for each engine, one for the ailerons/flaps etc. No more guessing what is going on based on instrumentation and sending a crewman to look out the window to see if he can spot the problem. Easier to detect icing, snow load on the wing while on the runway, etc.

about 5 months ago
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Will Cameras Replace Sideview Mirrors On Cars In 2018?

Derling Whirvish Why stop there? (496 comments)

What about ditching the windshield and replacing it with a 4k HD screen? Then you can embed the driver lower-down and deep inside a protective hardened shell. A no-glass car all around.

about 5 months ago
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NSF Report Flawed; Americans Do Not Believe Astrology Is Scientific

Derling Whirvish Don't confuse cosmetology with cosmology either (326 comments)

If you go to college and pick cosmology classes expecting cosmetology classes, you will be in for a big surprise first day of class. And if you pick them vice-versa as well. I don't know which situation would be more interesting -- maybe there's a TV sitcom in the concept somewhere. A young Howard Wolowitz-type mistakenly goes to cosmetology class, decides to stay with it what with all the girls there and all, and is vastly rewarded for doing so.

about 7 months ago
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Study Finds Methane Leaks Negate Benefits of Natural Gas-Powered Vehicles

Derling Whirvish Re:Are we doomed? (102 comments)

Does anyone get the impression that our civilization is doomed? Short of finding a way of making practical nuclear fusion reactors work, something that has been always "30 years from now" since the time I was in middle school forty years ago, there seems to be no solution to our future energy needs that don't do evil things to our planet's climate that eventually will doom our civilization.

You are 100% correct no matter what the source of energy. The course we are on is unsustainable at our current rate of energy consumption. Tom Murphy's excellent essay "Galactic-Scale Energy" made the case rather well (and it deserves its own Slashdot entry if it hasn't already had one -- I'm too lazy too look it up). About 1400 years from now (which is less time into the future than we are from the fall of the Roman Empire) we will be using more energy than is currently produced by the entirety of the sun if we don't back off on the growth of our energy consumption, which is showing no signs of easing up. It doesn't matter if the source of the energy is fossil fuels, nuclear fusion, or some future magic, the earth cannot host that amount of energy consumption. The planet will have reached its thermodynamic limit long before then.

about 7 months ago
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Judge Says You Can Warn Others About Speed Traps

Derling Whirvish Re:Common sense? In MY judiciary? (457 comments)

So don't use your high-beams, just quickly turn the low beams on and off.

Then they would ticket you for driving at night without use of any forward beams at all.

about 7 months ago
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Many Lasers Become One In Lockheed Martin's 30 kW Laser Weapon

Derling Whirvish Don't cross the beams (202 comments)

"There's something very important I forgot to tell you. Don't cross the laser beams. It would be bad. Try to imagine all life as you know it stopping instantaneously."

about 7 months ago
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Half of US Nuclear Missile Wing Implicated In Cheating

Derling Whirvish Re:No real surprise (313 comments)

"Career killer"? In what world is life as a Air Force officer and eventual retirement as an O-5 or above while still in your early 40s (late 30s even) not considered a successful career?

about 7 months ago
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Chinese Moon Rover Says an Early Goodnight

Derling Whirvish Native peoples of the New World rallying together (284 comments)

Hmm, we have a sort of precedent for that. Did the native peoples of the New World put aside their petty differences, rally together and be on the same side for once when the Europeans came over or did they split apart, some siding with them, some siding against them, some forming temporary alliances for quick gain, some shifting with the wind depending on which side was winning, fighting each other etc? Same for the native peoples of Africa.

about 7 months ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best On-Site Backup Plan?

Derling Whirvish Delete, delete, delete (326 comments)

I see this all the time with photographers. Bottom line: your photographs are not all that valuable. Some are, yes. Most are not. Pare them down. Delete the bad ones, the failures, the misfocussed, the bad exposures. The greatest photographers the world has ever known are only known for a few dozen photos at best. Do you really need an 8 TB photographic archive? Who's going to ever look at them all? Save the best. Delete the rest.

about 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Best Mobile Phone Solution With No Data Plan?

Derling Whirvish Re:Used Android (294 comments)

Let me second this. I have an old LG Versa which is not a smart phone but does have HTML browsing. Activating it on PagePlus costs $10 for four months access for 100 minutes and 5 cents per text. You can top it up whenever you run up against the $10 limitt. And if your are very frugal, that $10 can last the whole four months. That's $2.50 a month. And it's on Verizon's network, so the service is rock-solid. Beat that.

more than 2 years ago
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The Himalayas and Nearby Peaks Have Lost No Ice In Past 10 Years, Study Shows

Derling Whirvish Re:Isostacy (409 comments)

And the extra weight of the additional water in the Atlantic Ocean won't push down on the expanding and deepening Atlantic Rift causing sea levels to stay the same? Why does this effect only work in one direction?

more than 2 years ago

Submissions

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Why We Need Big, Bold Science Fiction

Derling Whirvish Derling Whirvish writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Derling Whirvish (636322) writes "Sci-Fi used to be about bold engineering, and so was America. Popular Mechanics Resident Contrarian Glenn Harlan Reynolds says that's the spirit we need to recapture. No more depressing dystopias (we're looking at you, The Hunger Games)—give us sci-fi that inspires people to dream big."
Link to Original Source

Journals

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Derling Whirvish Derling Whirvish writes  |  more than 9 years ago Why is it that I get mod points only when there's no interesting story to moderate? I sometimes let them expire.

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