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Intel Upgrades MinnowBoard: Baytrail CPU, Nearly Halves Price To $99

DeviceGuru SPI typo... (92 comments)

err... that should say "8MB SPI flash," not "8GB SPI" (sorry!)

about 6 months ago
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Intel Unveils Tiny $99 MinnowBoard Max Open SBC

DeviceGuru typo... (1 comments)

sorry: "8GB SPI flash" should read "8MB SPI flash"

about 6 months ago
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The Rise of Linux In In-Vehicle Infotainment

DeviceGuru ABI's summary of its ke IVI market data... (123 comments)

...titled "QNX and Windows Embedded Automotive Market Share to Drop to 69% with Open Source Linux/GENIVI Grabbing 20% of Automotive OS Shipments by end of 2018," can be found here. Excerpt: "ABI Research forecasts that the number of OEM-installed connected car telematics systems will increase from around 7.8 million at the end of 2012 to 46.8 million units globally by the end of 2018, with Linux/GENIVI platforms accounting for an increasing percentage of shipments during the period. At present, QNX Software and Microsoft together account for around 75 to 80% of the car-infotainment OS market. However, questions remain about the long-term future of proprietary automotive OSes. 'The automotive industry is set for a number of dramatic paradigm shifts,' said principal analyst, Gareth Owen. 'The adoption of open source platforms, such as GENIVI is just one example. In this regard, the automotive industry mirrors trends in mobile'."

about a year ago
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Celebrate Yuri Gagarin's 1951 Flight Into Space

DeviceGuru typo alert: 1961, not 1951 (2 comments)

actually, 2011-50 = 1961... that historic flight was in 1961

more than 3 years ago
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Which is better: Boxee Box or Roku?

DeviceGuru typo... (1 comments)

...that should say "sub-$100 Roku box," not "sub-$199 Roku box"

more than 3 years ago
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Roku Now Licensing its Media Player Design

DeviceGuru Re:Power costs (2 comments)

Roku's website says its device consumes 6W peak and 4W in standby. In contrast, Logitech told me their Review's peak power consumption is 36W, but was unable comment on standby modes. There's more than 20W difference there, but the key is probably how well the Review does in standby mode, since when you're watching TV you're using a lot more power than that anyhow.

more than 3 years ago
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Move Over BoxeeBox, Here Comes PopBox

DeviceGuru Re:NetFlix in Linux? (117 comments)

The problem is the DRM. Netflix relies on the latest MS Silverlight. Apparently the security processor embedded in these STBs' multimedia-oriented CPUs is capable of handling Netflix's requirements. So yes, theoretically it should be possible to get Netflix streaming working on Ubuntu........... eventually :-/

more than 4 years ago
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Netflix Comes To Tivo, AppleTV, Linux

DeviceGuru Linux Netflix support delayed till 2009 (190 comments)

Latest word from a Boxee spokesperson is that 'netflix currently do[es] not support running on linux, so we can't do it right now. we've been assured they will make it compatible early next year, so rest assured we will.'

more than 5 years ago

Submissions

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Digia Spins off Qt as Subsidiary

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about a week ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Digia has spun off a subsidiary called The Qt Company to unify Qt's commercial and open source efforts, and debuted a low-cost plan for mobile developers. The Linux-oriented Qt cross-platform development framework has had a tumultuous career, having been passed around Scandinavia over the years from Trolltech to Nokia and then from Nokia to Digia. Yet, Qt keeps rolling along in both commercial and open source community versions, continually adding support for new platforms and technologies, and gaining extensive support from mobile developers. Now Qt is its own company, or at least a wholly owned subsidiary under Digia. Finland-based Digia has largely been involved with the commercial versions of Qt since it acquired the platform from Nokia in 2012, but it has also sponsored the community Qt Project as a relatively separate project. Now, both efforts are being unified under one roof at The Qt Company and the new QT.io website, says Digia. Meanwhile, Digia will focus on its larger enterprise software business."
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Robot Operating System (ROS) to Officially Support ARM Processors

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about two weeks ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "The Open Source Robotics Foundation (OSRF), which maintains the open source Robot Operating System (ROS) and oversees the ROS.org website, has announced its first formal support for an ARM target. The organization will add support for the Qualcomm Snapdragon 600, a smartphone-oriented, quad-core, Cortex-A15-like system-on-chip running up to 1.7GHz. The Linux version of ROS for Snapdragon 600 will be available in Q4 of this year, with the Android version due in the first half of 2015. The OSRF will test, refine, and fully integrate support for the ARM instruction set architecture into ROS development efforts. OSRF will also perform ongoing maintenance to support ROS on the Snapdragon 600."
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MIPS Tempts Hackers with Raspbery Pi-like Dev Board

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about three weeks ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "In a bid to harness the energy and enthusiasm swirling around today’s open, hackable single board computers, Imagination Technologies, licensor of the MIPS ISA, has unveiled the Creator C120 development board, the ISA's counter to ARM's popular Raspberry Pi and BeagleBone Black SBCs. The MIPS dev board is based on a 1.2GHz dual-core MIPS32 system-on-chip and has 1GB RAM and 8GB flash, and there's also an SD card slot for expansion. Ports include video, audio, Ethernet, both WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0, and a bunch more. OS images are already available for Debian 7, Gentoo, Yocto, and Arch Linux, and Android v4.4 is expected to be available soon. Perhaps the most interesting feature of the board is that there's no pricing listed yet, because the company is starting out by giving the boards away free to developers who submit the most interesting projects."
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Emulator Brings x86 Linux Apps to ARM Devices

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about 1 month ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Eltechs announced a virtual machine that runs 32-bit x86 Linux applications on ARMv7 hardware. The ExaGear VM implements a virtual x86 Linux container on ARMv7 computers and is claimed to be 4.5 times faster than QEMU, according to Eltechs. The VM is based on binary translation technology and requires ARMv7, which means it should run on mini-PCs and SBCs based on Cortex-A8, A7, A9, and A15 processors — but sadly, it won’t run on the ARM11 (ARMv6) SoC found on the Raspberry Pi. It also does not support applications that require kernel modules. It currently requires Ubuntu (v12.04 or higher), but will soon support another, unnamed Linux distro, according to Eltechs, which is now accepting half price pre-orders without payment obligation."
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Project Aims to Build a Fully Open SoC and Dev Board

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about a month ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "A non-profit company is developing an open source 64-bit system-on-chip that will enable fully open hardware, 'from the CPU core to the development board.' The 'lowRISC' SoC is the brainchild of a team of hardware and software hackers from the University of Cambridge, with the stated goal of implementing a 'fully open computing eco-system, including the instruction set architecture (ISA), processor silicon, and development boards.' The lowRISC's design is based on a new 64-bit RISC-V ISA, developed at UC Berkeley. The RISC-V core design has now advanced enough for the lowRISC project to begin designing an SoC around it. Prototype silicon of a 'RISC-V Rocket' core itself has already been benchmarked at UC Berkeley, with results results (on GitHub) suggesting that in comparison to a 32-bit ARM Cortex-A5 core, the RISC-V core is faster, smaller, and uses less power. And on top of that it's open source. Oh, and there's a nifty JavaScript-based RISC-V simulator that runs in your browser."
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Android Motorcycle Helmet/HUD Gains Funding

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about a month ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Skully Systems has achieved Indiegogo funding for a high-tech Android 4.4 based motorcycle helmet with a head-up display (HUD), GPS navigation, and a 180-degree rearview camera. The Skully AR-1 helmet launched on Indiegogo on Aug. 10 and quickly blasted past its $250,000 flexible funding goal and has already surpassed $900,000 in funding. The helmet runs a heavily modified version of Android 4.4, with both screen size and safety in mind, according to Skully’s Tow. 'You should not think of it as being Android as seen in a phone; it doesn’t run the same skin,' wrote Tow on the Skully forum page. 'You instead should think of it as a variant of Linux, not Android per se. What counts is the device drivers, graphics rendering for our turn by turn directions and vehicle telemetry, etc. More nerdy things like communication over the I2C bus to the image processing module.' Helmets are available starting at $1,399, with shipments due in May 2015."
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Tiniest Linux COM yet?

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about 4 months ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "An open-spec COM that runs OpenWRT Linux on a MIPS-based Ralink RT5350 SoC has won its Indiegogo funding. The $20, IoT-focused VoCore measures 25 x 25mm. How low can you go? Tiny computer-on-modules (COMs) for Internet of Things (IoT) applications are popping up everywhere, with recent, Linux-ready entries including Intel’s Atom or Quark-based Edison, Ingenic’s MIPS/Xburst-based Newton, Acme Systems’s ARM9/SAM9G25 based Arrietta G25, and SolidRun’s quad-core i.MX6-based MicroSOM. Now, an unnamed Chinese startup has raised over six times its $6,000 Indiegogo funding goal for what could be the smallest, cheapest Linux COM yet."
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What Makes a Good Open, Hacker SBC?

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about 4 months ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "LinuxGizmos and Linux.com have teamed up to conduct an annual Rate your favorite hacker SBCs survey, to let the hacker/developer community generate a top-10 list of favorite currently shipping single board computers, and to indicate which features were most important in casting their votes. The survey lists 32 SBCs — from A (APC Rock) to Z (ZedBoard) — and lets participants enter alternatives if their favorites aren't included in the list. Participants can also optionally enter a raffle for a chance to win some Tux, embedded Linux, and Android related swag. The 10-day survey ends on May 17th, after which results and trend analysis will be published."
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U.S. Military Drones Migrating to Linux

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about 5 months ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Raytheon is switching its UAV control system from Solaris to Linux for U.S. military drones, starting with a Northrop Grumman MQ-8C Fire Scout helicopter. Earlier this month Raytheon entered into a $15.8 million contract with the U.S. Navy to upgrade Raytheon’s control systems for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), according to a May 2 Avionics Intelligence report. The overhaul is designed to implement more modern controls to help ground-based personnel control UAVs. Raytheon’s tuxified version of its Vertical Takeoff and Landing Unmanned Air Vehicle (VTUAV) Tactical Control System (TCS) will also implement universal UAV control qualities. As a result the TCS can be used in in all U.S. Navy, Air Force, Army, and Marine Corps UAVs that weigh at least 20 pounds. By providing an open standard, the common Linux-based platform is expected to reduce costs by limiting the types of UAV control systems that need to be built and maintained for each craft."
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Intel Unveils Tiny $99 MinnowBoard Max Open SBC

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about 6 months ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Intel and CircuitCo have revealed a smaller, faster, 2nd-gen MinnowBoard open SBC based on an Atom E3800 SoC and supported by both Android 4.4 and various standard Linux OSes. The MinnowBoard Max, which will ship in Q3 starting at $99, blows past the original MinnowBoard (Slashdot video) on price, performance, and energy consumption. The 3.9 x 2.9-inch Max's $99 starting price includes a 64-bit 1.46GHz Intel Atom E3815 (Bay Trail-T) CPU, 1GB RAM and 8GB SPI flash, and coastline ports for MicroSD, Micro-HDMI, GbE, dual USB, and SATA. Unlike the original MinnowBoard, the Max provides two expansion connectors: a low-speed header, with signals similar to the Arduino's Shield connector; and a high-speed connector, which can support mSATA and mini-PCIe sockets on expansion modules, among other interfaces. Although the Max's design supports CPUs up to Intel's quad-core 1.91GHz (10W TDP) E3845, only two choices shown initially at MinnowBoard.org, with the higher-end $129 $129 model stepping up to a 1.33GHz dual-core E3825 plus 2GB RAM.."
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Linux-powered Telepresence Robot Gets Personal

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about 8 months ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Suitable Technologies has announced Beam+, a smaller, less costly, consumer model of its Linux-powered Beam mobile telepresence robot. The Beam+ offers essentially the same capabilities as the professionally-oriented original Beam, but it's smaller, lighter, has a much lower price tag, and offers a few scaled-back specs including reduced audio quality, shorter battery life, and a smaller display. The original Beam model, introduced two years ago, currently starts at $16,000, and the new Beam+ will be sold for about $2,000. However, the Beam+ is currently available for pre-order at a special price of $995 for the first 1,000 units ordered. The remotely-piloted Beam+ can be controlled via a WiFi or 4G LTE cellular connection, and runs Robot Operating System plus low-latency Skype-like video conferencing software on top of an Ubuntu-based embedded OS. An entertaining Beam+ demo YouTube video is available here."
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Roku Gets Sucked Into TVs

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about 8 months ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Roku, which shipped its 5 millionth streaming media player last year, is now having its Linux-based STB technology embedded directly within Smart TVs, known as Roku TVs. Roku CEO Anthony Wood announced Roku TV this week in a blog post this week. It culminates a six-year evolution from the company's initial Netflix Player by Roku in 2008, to the company’s current 1,200-strong channel store — which represents 'more options than all the other Smart TVs in the market,' claims Wood. The company’s success can most likely be attributed to its having made an API for channel developers readily available, along with a consistent focus on providing a low-cost, easy-to-use, reliable product. The first Roku TVs will be made by TCL and Hisense, which together accounted for roughly nine percent of the global TV market, says Roku. Various Roku TV models from TCL and Hisense (and perhaps others), in sizes from 32 to 55 inches, are expected to ship this fall. No word on pricing."
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Google Launches Android Automotive Consortium

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about 9 months ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Google announced an initiative with Audi, GM, Honda, Hyundai, and Nvidia aimed at fostering and standardizing Android in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems. The Open Automotive Alliance (OAA) is dedicated to a common platform that will drive innovation, and make technology in the car safer and more intuitive for everyone, says the group. The OAA is further committed to bringing the Android platform to cars starting in 2014. In its FAQ, the OAA suggests that this is not a full-blown Android in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) system, but rather a standardized integration stack between automotive systems and mobile Android devices. However, the OAA FAQ also discloses broader ambitions for 2015 and beyond: 'We're also developing new Android platform features that will enable the car itself to become a connected Android device.'"
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Russian Startup Offers Wireless Remote Controller for Cars

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about 9 months ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "A Russian startup called Virt2real has produced a small $120 Linux-based WiFi controller board for remote control and video observation applications, and has demonstrated its use in a remote controlled car. Inspired by Back to the Future and James Bond film Tomorrow Never Dies, Virt2real's Bond Car demo (YouTube video) shows a Vauxhall (Opel) Vectra being remotely controlled by an iPad via WiFi. The iPad interface includes touchscreen-based steering wheel, brakes, and accelerator, which are mirrored in the car by a mechanical contraption that physically turns the steering wheel and pushes the brake and accelerator pedals. The company is now accepting orders for the first 1,000 of its Virt2real controller board, and is working on a Virt2real-based Bond Car it that will work with most cars."
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LinuxDevices Content Returns to the Web

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about 9 months ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "One of most widely respected repositories of embedded and mobile Linux news and information has just returned to the web. LinuxDevices.com, which tracked the evolution of embedded and mobile Linux from an unknown player to being at the heart of billions of mobile and embedded devices, transferred from Ziff Davis Enterprise to QuinStreet through an acquisition two years ago, then went dormant for a year, and finally vanished from the web in May. Now, through an arrangement with QuinStreet, more than 14,000 news items and articles are back online in the form of a LinuxDevices Archive, hosted by LinuxGizmos.com. The archive is searchable from a calendar interface that lets you click on any month of any year between 1999 and 2012, to see what was going on in that time period."
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Roku Finally Adds YouTube to its Iconic Media Player

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about 9 months ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "Roku's popular Linux-based media players have long been criticized for their glaring omission of YouTube video support. As of Dec. 17, that is no longer the case, provided you have the high-end Roku 3 player and live in the U.S., Canada, Ireland, or the U.K. Google's YouTube channel is available immediately for the Roku 3 in resolutions up to 1080p, and will be supported on additional models (though probably just Roku 2) next year, according the company. Previously, the only way to run YouTube over a Roku box was to use the third-party, subscription based PlayOn service, which requires a connected PC or Mac running the PlayOn app. The YouTube update also adds a Send to TV feature, letting you send videos to the Roku for display on the TV with a single click."
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AirPlay Alternative Mirrors and Streams to TVs and PCs

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about 9 months ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "AirTame has developed an AirPlay-like protocol and HDMI dongle for 1080p video streaming and screen mirroring from PCs to PCs and TVs, and has substantially exceeded its $160,000 Indiegogo funding goal. AirTame streams from Windows, Mac, and Linux PCs to other PCs via apps at both ends, and to TVs via the HDMI dongle, and also offers a multicast mode for broadcasting to multiple PCs and TVs for use in classrooms or conferences. But at least initially, there won't be support for Android or iOS devices in the mix, due OS restrictions. The company says it plans to release AirTame's software, API, and protocol source code under a dual-license enabling free use with GPL-like restrictions, and paid use for commercial applications requiring proprietary modifications."
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Open Source IoT Alliance Taps Qualcomm AllJoyn

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about 9 months ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "The Linux Foundation announced an open source based alliance for the Internet of Things (IoT). The LF's AllSeen Alliance is designed to promote an open source project for IoT interoperability built on Qualcomm's open source peer-to-peer AllJoyn IoT interoperability framework. AllJoyn offers an object-oriented approach to making peer-to-peer connections. It enables compliant products, applications, and services to communicate over a variety of transport layers, including WiFi, power line, or Ethernet, without the need for Internet access. AllJoyn could enable, for example, a smart door lock that seamlessly connects to AllJoyn-compatible smart lights and security cameras. Unauthorized entries would trigger the lights to flash, and the camera to take a photo of the intruder. The photo would automatically be uploaded to a compliant smart TV. Further AllSeen Alliance technical details are on its developer resources page."
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$39 Arduino compatible boardset runs Linux on new x86 SoC

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about 10 months ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "DM&P Group has begun shipping a $39 Arduino compatible boardset and similar mini-PC equipped with a new computer-on-module based on a new 300MHz x86 compatible Vortex86EX system-on-chip. The $39 86Duino Zero boardset mimics an Arduino Leonardo, in terms of both form-factor and I/O expansion. The tiny $49 86Duino Educake mini-PC incorportates the same functionality, but in a 78 x 70 x 29mm enclosure with an integrated I/O expansion breadboard built into its top surface. The mini-PC's front and back provide 2x USB, audio in/out, Ethernet, and COM interfaces, power input, and an SD card slot. The hardware and software source for all the boards, including the computer-on-module, are available for download under open source licenses at the 86Duino.com website."
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HDMI Dongle Turns TVs Into Giant Android Tablets

DeviceGuru DeviceGuru writes  |  about 10 months ago

DeviceGuru (1136715) writes "The BiggiFi Indiegogo project is nearing its funding goal for a $79 HDMI dongle that essentially turns HDTVs into supersized Android tablets. The BiggiFi device is claimed to let users run unmodified Android apps on their TVs using their phone or tablet as the TV’s touchscreen — including motion input for games — without screen-mirroring overhead latency. As explained by BiggiFi creator Karl Zhao, an Android app on the user’s phone or tablet collects touch input signals and transmits them over WiFi to a server daemon in the Android Framework layer on the BiggiFi device, which passes the event data to the device driver layer. When the action finally reaches the app, it's as though the BiggiFi/TV system has its own physical touchscreen. The result is claimed to be a fairly lossless Android experience, and requires no modification to Android apps. The process supports input gestures such as slide, scroll, pinch, zoom, and soft keyboard input, and also supports vibration and accelerometer movements, enabling tilting for gameplay, according to the project. Camera and mic input will be added in the future. Oh, and an app for using iPhones and iPads as the remote touchscreen is also being developed."
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