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Dutch Court Says Government Can Receive Bulk Data from NSA

DickBreath What about a mutual spying arrangement? (109 comments)

If we pay you to spy on our citizens, because we're not allowed to do it ourselves, then will you pay us to spy on your citizens because you cannot do that yourself?

It's good for the global economy because money changes hands. (Nevermind that no actual goods or benefits to society are procduced.)

Everyone is happy. (Nevermind citizens in the global police state.)

4 days ago
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Dutch Court Says Government Can Receive Bulk Data from NSA

DickBreath Re:At least they're open about it. (109 comments)

They can be open about it because the citizens no longer have any recourse against them. Voting? Don't make me { laugh | cry }.

4 days ago
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Lenovo Halts Sales of Small-Screen Windows 8.1 Tablets Due To "Lack of Interest"

DickBreath Re:Lenovo is overpriced (125 comments)

Lenovo is a Chinese maker.

And they are offering these at low prices -- in the developing world -- because nobody in the western world wants this Windows 8 crap.

about two weeks ago
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Lenovo Halts Sales of Small-Screen Windows 8.1 Tablets Due To "Lack of Interest"

DickBreath Re:Never liked small screens with any OS (125 comments)

It's not the size of your screen, it's how you use it.

But I guess that line is only said by people with small screens.

about two weeks ago
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Lenovo Halts Sales of Small-Screen Windows 8.1 Tablets Due To "Lack of Interest"

DickBreath Re: Why and how is it "fortunate"? (125 comments)

They have to firesale those devices in developing countries. In the US, the EPA isn't going to let them just bury them in a big hole in the ground. The Windows 8 software might leak into the soil causing a massive ecological disaster.

about two weeks ago
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Lenovo Halts Sales of Small-Screen Windows 8.1 Tablets Due To "Lack of Interest"

DickBreath Re: Not usable (125 comments)

And Microsoft seems to just love, and perhaps even encourage this particular confusion. In fact their poor branding would seem to have been deliberately designed to cause confusion leading to people buying an RT device and then discovering that it doesn't really run Windows apps. It only runs the tiny library of Windows 8 RT apps.

about two weeks ago
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Lenovo Halts Sales of Small-Screen Windows 8.1 Tablets Due To "Lack of Interest"

DickBreath Re:Miami Vice (125 comments)

Your own argument about western culture arriving slightly delayed in the developing world should have caused you to conclude that the developing would would think something like:
1. If westerners aren't buying this Windows 8 crap, then why are they sending it to us?
2. If westerners are using non-Windows tablets, then we should be too (but perhaps just a bit delayed)

Yes, it's hammer time. For Microsoft. And it's about time.

about two weeks ago
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Massive Job Cuts Are Reportedly Coming For Microsoft Employees

DickBreath Re:Who couldn't see this coming? (300 comments)

> And yet, they are still making gobs of money. In fact, they are more profitable than ever.

I remember in the late 1970's when IBM people were laughing at these 'toy' microcomputers. HA HA! Those toys will never be like real computers. Certainly not a threat to IBM which is making gobs of money. In fact, IBM is more profitable than ever.

IBM introduced a PC in 1981. Thinking they might sell up to two million. By the mid 1990's IBM had lost the PC market, abandoned the PS/2 attempt to re-monopolize it, and eventually got out of the PC business completely. Before the end of the 1990's IBM had re-invented itself. Think the same thing won't happen to Microsoft? You may be too young to remember, but in the 1980's, even by the late 1980's it was completely laughable to even consider that IBM might find itself on hard times. But it happened. And just a few years ago it was laughable to suggest that Microsoft might lose its industry dominance. Not so much laughable anymore.


> Moves like this don't really help anything.. not even the bottom line, since the massive cuts crush morale and limit the ability of the company to innovate to keep ahead of the competition.

Moves far more radical than this may be the only way Microsoft stays around in the long term. We'll see what Microsoft looks like in a decade.

about two weeks ago
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Massive Job Cuts Are Reportedly Coming For Microsoft Employees

DickBreath Re:Who couldn't see this coming? (300 comments)

You lack faith in Microsoft, sir.

Windows 8 is going wonderful! Everyone loves the new UI. That is why Windows 9 will never bring back the Start menu. Just watch, you'll see!

PC Sales are not being affected by the new mobile device trend. Microsoft will dominate mobile devices and phones any day now! You'll see!

Oh, and some day Microsoft will make a dent in data centers, and Microsoft Azure Cloud will become important. Of course, Azure Cloud is the only cloud service that was built for Windows instead of Linux workloads. And Windows is used by some large* computing cluster users, um, somewhere. And businesses using Linux workloads would be happy to trust their business built on Linux to Microsoft, a company that to this very day is working to destroy Linux.

(*and by large, I mean much larger scale than you are thinking if you are thinking of Windows)

about two weeks ago
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Normal Humans Effectively Excluded From Developing Software

DickBreath Re:Cry Me A River (608 comments)

I learned BASIC in 1977, about the same way, and about as quickly.

And I was writing a few BASIC programs shortly thereafter. But they are today what I would call TRIVIAL. Things that I would do in a single method of a modern language. With much better style, correctness, comprehensibility and maintainability.

Having just learned programming myself doesn't mean I was by any means an expert ready to work on big commercial problems worth lots of money. It took years more to learn a lot of important things. Structured Programming (aka giving up GOTO). Encapsulation. Information hiding. Data structures and dynamic memory. Algorithms. Understanding performance classification of algorithms. Understanding how the machine works at the low level. Writing toy or elementary compilers. Learning a LISP language (pick any one, they will teach you the same important and valuable lessons). Learning databases. How they work as well as how to use them. Read a few good books on human interface design before building a complex GUI program. I could go on and on.


> You can't learn how to build a highly optimised, always available, secure e-commerce trading platform in 8 hours.

Correct. The point here I think is that to have all of the valuable skills that makes you good at something, and fast at it, and apparently able to recognize the solutions to problems very quickly is -- lots and lots of study and practice. Years of learning. Failures (hopefully on some of your own toy problems first rather than commercial ones). Figuring out how to debug complex systems -- without or prior to the existence of source level debuggers.

I don't have a lot of sympathy for those who cry because employers want skilled programmers. Well, professional sports teams want skilled players. And modelling agencies want beautiful people. These things come with some combination of luck of the draw and effort to take advantage of it. (Those models don't eat donuts, for example.) I also think computer geeks should be able to cry and whine that humanities studies are unfair.

about three weeks ago
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Normal Humans Effectively Excluded From Developing Software

DickBreath In the old days . . . (608 comments)

From TFA (the friendly article, or whatever other F-word you prefer) . . .
> In the old days there was a respected profession of application programming.
> There was a minority of elite system programmers who built infrastructure and tools
> that empowered the majority of application programmers.


I think it is still that way. But now there is a third class who think that breaking into the application programming is some kind of godlike elite skill because it requires you to actually know more than the mere syntax of a language. Programming is racist and sexist because it requires you to even learn the syntax of a programming language. Why can't the computer just do what they say? Why do they need a special language? Why should it be necessary to learn to design complex databases, and understand in memory data structures and algorithms? Why focus on gaining lots of insight in order to come up with vastly superior algorithms?

In short, from what I see on some programming boards, what some people seem to want is a high paying position where an untrained monkey could get a computer to do what the boss wants, and then collect a paycheck -- um, no. Direct deposit.

about three weeks ago
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Normal Humans Effectively Excluded From Developing Software

DickBreath Re:Cry Me A River (608 comments)

That may be true, but you miss the deeper underlying issue that TFA (the friendly article) is whining about.

They want to be able to be a programming superstar by reading a book such as:
* Learn Programming in 24 Hours!
* Learn Brain Surgery in 24 Hours!
* Learn Rocket Science in 24 Hours!
* Learn To Be A Concert Pianist in 10 EASY Lessons!

Various programming boards are flooded with people who want to know how to break into programming for big bucks, quick, overnight, but don't want to actually do the hard learning.

about three weeks ago
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Hierarchical Membrane For Cleaning Up Oil Spills

DickBreath Oil companies will be thrilled to hear this (32 comments)

They will no longer need to worry about oil spills. Many of those silly, and very expensive 'safety' precautions can now be avoided. Saving costs increases shareholder value.

The only real drawback to this solution seems to be that the membrane's ingredients do not include ground up kittens and babies.

about a month ago
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US House of Representatives Votes To Cut Funding To NSA

DickBreath Re:How will Congress monitor this? (164 comments)

Why would anyone bother to LIE to Congress when you can just PAY them instead?

Haven't you heard, congress will do anything, and I mean ANYTHING for money. They don't even make much of a pretense of representing the people any more.

about a month ago
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US House of Representatives Votes To Cut Funding To NSA

DickBreath Re:At least the elected still have to listen (164 comments)

Yes. This can be circumvented. If these people can get around the clear wording of the constitution, then they can do anything.

Black is white. Up is down. Secret courts can issue secret overly broad warrants to secretly spy on everyone all the time. People can be secretly compelled to secretly hand over their secret keys and keep this a secret. People can be compelled to help spy on you and keep this a secret. People can be secretly arrested, and taken to secret prisons. We have secret trials with secret evidence. Defendants are now not even allowed access to the secret evidence against them. I thought I had heard everything when a government official said that their interpretation of the law was secret. (I'm sure they were thinking this keeps the enemy from knowing.)

So yes, these people can go on with business as usual. All they need is a hand waving rationalization to make it all okay.

about a month ago
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US House of Representatives Votes To Cut Funding To NSA

DickBreath Re:This is a start (164 comments)

I strongly agree! We should NOT pay to have our products' security secretly weakened.

The government should do it for free*.

(* just like 'free' public roads, public education, and many other 'free' things from the government)

about a month ago
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US House of Representatives Votes To Cut Funding To NSA

DickBreath Re:Hm... (164 comments)

The NSA would need a logo and branding for such a large advertising and PR campaign as you suggest.

I know! How about Big Brother is Watching You! And the face should, of course, have a smile and a pleasant, re-assuring image.

about a month ago
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US House of Representatives Votes To Cut Funding To NSA

DickBreath Re:Next! (164 comments)

Funny? Why oh why wasn't your post moded Insightful?

A few decades ago the very existence of NSA was a secret. The CIA had a bad rep.

Now the NSA has a bad rep. So it's time to wind down the importance of NSA and introduce a new sooper dooper sekrit spy agency that can do dirty tricks in the dark without oversight, and especially without pesky annoyances like laws and the constitution. Meanwhile the NSA and CIA can both get all the public bad press, criticism, and 'oversight' of pointy-haired congresscritters.

about a month ago
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HP Unveils 'The Machine,' a New Computer Architecture

DickBreath Re:Run a completely new OS? (257 comments)

Linux has one 'survival of the fittest' characteristic that guarantees its long term success. It is open source and has a real community behind it.

To briefly address your other flamebait points:

IBM is not the only major contributor to Linux. Major corporate contributors include lots of well known names. In fact, Linux development is largely corporate contributors.

As for the obvious troll is obvious point about SCO, I would just say that SCO turned out to be little more than a bump in the road. A pimple on the butt of closed source software. Your mention of SCO seems unconnected to what leads in to it.

about a month and a half ago
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Apple To Be Investigated By the EU Over Tax Affairs

DickBreath Two investigations in a row (155 comments)

The EU investigates Apple. And Toyota investigates Hovercars.

about a month and a half ago

Submissions

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Apple Bounceback patent FINAL rejection from USPTO affects Samsung damages

DickBreath DickBreath writes  |  about a year ago

DickBreath (207180) writes "I knew when Apple won against Samsung that it was just a little bit too soon for Apple to start counting those billions. According to Groklaw Apple's '381 patent has received a final rejection from the USPTO. This will have a huge effect on the damages Apple won in the Apple vs. Samsung I which is still in appeal. Apple and Samsung are squabbling over whether the Apple vs Samsung II trial should wait on the outcome of the appeal of Apple vs Samsung I."
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Hell Freezes Over: SCO vs IBM trial back on again

DickBreath DickBreath writes  |  more than 2 years ago

DickBreath (207180) writes "It looks like the lawsuit SCO started back in March 2003 against IBM (but really against Linux) is back on again.

SCO first filed this clue-challenged lawsuit in March 2003. SCO claimed Linux was contaminated with code IBM stole from UNIX and that it was impossible to remove the infringement. Therefore, said SCO, all Linux users owe SCO a license fee of $1399 per cpu — but since SCO are such great guys, for a limited time, you can pay only $699 per CPU for your dirty infringing copy of Linux.

Of course, Novell claimed and later proved in court that SCO doesn't even own the copyrights on UNIX that it is suing over.

IBM claims there is no infringing code in Linux. SCO never provided evidence of the massive infringement it claimed existed. The source ordered SCO three times to produce its evidence, twice extending the deadline, until it set a FINAL deadline of Dec 22, 2005 — which came and went — with SCO producing nothing but a lot of hand waving. Meantime, SCO filed for bankruptcy protection in September 2007 because it was being beaten up in court so badly with the court going against SCO."

Link to Original Source
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SCO is Toast! Court Rules: Novell owns UNIX.

DickBreath DickBreath writes  |  more than 6 years ago

DickBreath writes "Judge Kimball has ruled in the SCO vs. Novell. See it here on Groklaw.

SCO does not own Unix copyrights. Therefore, SCO has no standing to sue IBM re: Linux.

Example of standing: Jane cannot sue Bill for sealing John's tires. Jane does not have standing. (although John has standing to sue Bill for stealing his tires.)

SCO does not have standing for the lawsuit it filed against IBM back in Mar 2003. SCO was hoping to win $5 Billion from IBM, and then charge every Linux user $699 per cpu.

There is not yet an outcome in the IBM case. But I would be willing to bet we'll see some action RSN."

Link to Original Source

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