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Comments

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NPR: '80s Ads Are Responsible For the Lack of Women Coders

DoofusOfDeath Re:Can we stop trying to come up with a reason? (617 comments)

These aren't just whatever, "it's just people making choices". It's clearly social and political influence.

Perhaps, but just about every choice we make is affected by social and political influence.

What am I having for dinner tonight? That's affected by externalities that affect my income (via career choice and and food prices), tastes (what was affordable when I was a kid), and who's doing the cooking (is my wife running errands when dinner needs to be made?).

What clothes did I put on today? That's affected by my personal tastes, but also by the tastes of the buyers at Target a few years ago, and on the economics of trans-oceanic clothes production, and the governmental policies of the U.S., China, Vietnam, and Thailand.

Why am I a programmer? Well, my Dad did electrical engineering, so we spent more time talking about computers than perhaps a lot of families did in the 70's and 80's. It also meant we could afford a Commodore 64 for me to start playing around with. And I was a little socially awkward as well as introverted, so programming in my basement had more appeal compared to socializing in some cases.

If the goal here is some kind of self-realization of every individual, without the influence of external factors, I just don't see how that's going to happen. I don't see any viable way to actually eliminate "unacceptable" influences, especially indirect ones.

yesterday
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Facebook 'Safety Check' Lets Friends Know You're OK After a Major Disaster

DoofusOfDeath Re:Would sooner have a Dislike button than this (130 comments)

How fucking hard is that.

Today Facebook's market cap is about 188 billions U.S. dollars. Somehow I think they're doing okay without your direction.

4 days ago
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Lead Mir Developer: 'Mir More Relevant Than Wayland In Two Years'

DoofusOfDeath Site broken (224 comments)

It appears to be Slashdotted. Someone's got to show them how to use IIS!

4 days ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

DoofusOfDeath Re:Git is an example of Linus Torvalds at his wors (387 comments)

Effectively, Git is abusive. It drags every user through a steep learning curve.

You strike me as the kind of person that also considers all men latent rapists.

Wow, you're really an asshole. Because someone had an argument you didn't like, you conflated them with someone else you didn't like, in a way that let you work rape into the conversation.

I see where you're coming from, and indeed I am sometimes an asshole/ But I think you're misunderstanding what I meant by my earlier post. Let me explain.

In a number of news stories about particularly vocal feminists and/or politically correct college campus administrators, I've seen what I'd consider an unreasonable inflation of the seriousness of their perceived slights. For example, a man looking a woman up and down is the same as rape. Or a white person getting a job for which a black person applied being racist.

The statement "Effectively, Git is abusive. It drags every user through a steep learning curve." reminded me of that kind of inflation. And so, I quipped, he reminded me of the silliness I've seen in the "staring = rape" crowd.

However, my apologies for making a joke that was more confusing than funny. Apparently I struck the wrong balance.

5 days ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

DoofusOfDeath Re:Git is an example of Linus Torvalds at his wors (387 comments)

For all cases where effective is a synonym for "just barely works enough to be easier to use than the effort required to convince the entire community to move to something better."

Horseshit. Most projects I've been in that have adopted git did so because it was the best tool we could find. There was no inertia with which those projects had to contend.

> You strike me as the kind of person that also considers all men latent rapists.

Wow.

It's the mildest response I could find at the time to the poster's statement.

5 days ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

DoofusOfDeath Re:Git is an example of Linus Torvalds at his wors (387 comments)

Git uses poor naming, is poorly documented, and is, in my opinion, an example of the worst of the lack of social sophistication in programmers.

And yet we use it, because it's that effective If you can make a better git than git, I'm sure we'll all eventually move to it. But right now your armchair-quarterbacking.

Effectively, Git is abusive. It drags every user through a steep learning curve.

You strike me as the kind of person that also considers all men latent rapists.

A program is not finished until the user interface and documentation make using the program as easy as possible.

So what I think you're saying is that Linus should have iterated on git privately, indefinitely, until it meets your standard of done-ness?

If we care about him, and we should, we must help him become more socially capable.

I dunno, he hasn't gotten divorced yet, he's living a stable life, enjoys what he does, and is making a very positive contribution to society. Exactly what about him do you think is so in need of fixing that we should attend to that rather than, for example, find more time reading to our own kids?

I'm writing a book about how people use their brains.

Please warn us when you know its ISBN.

If you don't like my explanations, it is not sufficient to drop the subject or just complain; it is necessary to make your own theories about the problems.

No it's not. In no way have you demonstrated that we have a moral or practical obligation to consider your statements. In fact, the only reason I'm writing about them at all is because I felt you needed an intervention, not Linux.

5 days ago
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Torvalds: I Made Community-Building Mistakes With Linux

DoofusOfDeath Re:The language in the old west (387 comments)

I think there's a difference between using strong language on a person who demonstrably done something you don't agree with, versus death threats, continuous abuse, stalking or directing said vitriol against large groups people only related by race, gender, etc.

Well no shit, you stupid human some-sex fuck!

5 days ago
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Apple Announces iPad Air 2, iPad mini 3, OS X Yosemite and More

DoofusOfDeath Re:Problem (353 comments)

Can somebody please explain why it would be smart to buy some of these devices?

For many of us, it's not a good investment. But if someone can afford (and wants) to replace his computer every few years, it could make sense.

For my wife's photography business, we considered a Mac, because color calibration is a huge deal. In the end though, we decided that Windows' color management was close enough to OS X's, that we preferred the low cost and at-home-repairability of a Windows box.

5 days ago
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Apple Announces iPad Air 2, iPad mini 3, OS X Yosemite and More

DoofusOfDeath Re:Confucius say: (353 comments)

Considering that my Black MacBook (2006) lasted eight years, it was a good investment.

I'm glad it worked for you. But depending on where you're going with that statement, you might be committing the Texas sharpshooter's fallacy.

5 days ago
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Technology Heats Up the Adultery Arms Race

DoofusOfDeath Re:Telling quote (304 comments)

Even if no-fault is merely an option, it doesn't change the fact that, as far as I know, the criminality (in some states) of adultery is hardly ever a factor in people's thinking, and therefore wouldn't explain the prevalence of divorce-related snooping activity.

I don't understand why you keep on bringing up the fact that dirty laundry is aired during some divorce proceedings. I can see how that's relevant to snooping technology, but I thought we were arguing whether or not the criminality of infidelity drives the use of snooping technology. If anything, you're kind of making my point for me, by providing an alternative explanation for that prevalence.

Anyway, thanks for the discussion. I need to get back to work now. Be well.

about a week ago
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Technology Heats Up the Adultery Arms Race

DoofusOfDeath Re:Telling quote (304 comments)

But how do you expect someone's "feelings of affection" NOT to wane when they find out they've been cheated on.

I don't expect that. Let me clarify what I'm arguing for:

- In the case of adultery, divorce is probably reasonable, and I wouldn't expect the cheated-on spouse to necessarily ever feel affection again towards the cheater.

- Even marriages which don't involve adultery generally go through dry spells of affection. But for many (most?) committed couples who stick it out, those feelings come back, and are sometimes accompanied by the additional respect and admiration and affection that come from a seeing each other grow, and from a life-long love story unfolding.

- So even people who want to reason from a purely hedonistic standpoint (which I wouldn't recommend) should consider whether or not they're selling themselves short by committing adultery.

about a week ago
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Technology Heats Up the Adultery Arms Race

DoofusOfDeath Re:Telling quote (304 comments)

Divorce courts are noted for threats to air the dirty laundry and other forms of blackmail.

Sure, but AFAIK that has nothing to do with, in some states, adultery being a crime

That is, the blackmail is never of the form, "Let me have 70% of our marital assets, or else I'll give evidence of your infidelity to the local district attorney who will lock you up." Remember, this whole discussion you and I are having is about whether or not the criminal law aspects of infidelity are actually relevant in today's U.S.

There would be a LOT less of this if you simply enacted no-fault divorce.

From Wikipedia: "Since at least 1985, no-fault divorce has been available in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia."

about a week ago
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Technology Heats Up the Adultery Arms Race

DoofusOfDeath Re:Telling quote (304 comments)

I'm really sorry. I guess you can take some small comfort that your moral compass seems to be working well, and that you've been a good enough husband otherwise that she appreciates you.

about a week ago
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Technology Heats Up the Adultery Arms Race

DoofusOfDeath Re:Telling quote (304 comments)

It's a two-way street, and cheating is a symptom of a lack of commitment. To argue that the one cheated on should be obliged to sacrifice their own integrity by continuing in such a relationship creates a very unequal and unfair "partnership."

I wasn't arguing that one should stay committed to an unfaithful spouse. I was arguing that I've had a very happy life for having stuck with my wife even through periods when I didn't feel warm and fuzzy.

How is it selfish or immature to say "you broke the rules, there are consequences?"

If appears we're talking about different situations, as I mentioned earlier in this current post.

about a week ago
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Technology Heats Up the Adultery Arms Race

DoofusOfDeath Re:Telling quote (304 comments)

I don't think whether or not it's backward is relevant to the point you were making.

You had made this statement:

Of course, if you had civilized laws that didn't make adultery a criminal offense (it's not in Canada; the only grounds for divorce where I live are the desire of one of the parties to exit the relationship) you wouldn't have so much need for people spying on each other.

You were basically saying that the technical criminality of adultery had a material impact on the need for people to spy on each other.

What I'm saying is that, at least in the U.S., I've seen no evidence that those legal codes are on the mind of almost anyone. I suspect the spying has more to do with jealousy, or (diminishingly) to gain an upper hand in divorce court.

about a week ago
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Technology Heats Up the Adultery Arms Race

DoofusOfDeath Re:Telling quote (304 comments)

Studies such as this one report a higher level of feelings of commitment between recently married couples than those cohabitating for a long period, which just goes to show that marriage tends to give people a false sense of commitment, given the high divorce rate. Feelings change.

Yes, of course feelings change. People who are committed to their spouse generally know this, and learn to ride out those dry spells. Successful marriage requires commitment to, and sacrifice for, the other person. This is the grown-up's definition of love.

If a person quits a marriage (by divorce or cheating) any time his/her feelings of affection wane, then not only are they being immature and selfish, but they're also missing out on the joys of a life-long love story.

about a week ago
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Technology Heats Up the Adultery Arms Race

DoofusOfDeath Re:Telling quote (304 comments)

Of course, if you had civilized laws that didn't make adultery a criminal offense (it's not in Canada; the only grounds for divorce where I live are the desire of one of the parties to exit the relationship) you wouldn't have so much need for people spying on each other. It's bad enough when facebook and google and the government do it.

I don't understand where you're coming from with this statement. It seems that many people cheat on their spouses, but I can't think of any time, ever that I've heard of someone being criminally prosecuted for it in the U.S.

about a week ago

Submissions

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Choosing which OSS database project to help

DoofusOfDeath DoofusOfDeath writes  |  about 2 years ago

DoofusOfDeath (636671) writes "I've done a good bit of SQL development / tuning in the past. After being away from the database world for a while to finish grad school, I'm about ready to get back in the game. I want to start contributing to some OSS database project, both for fun and perhaps to help my employment prospects in western Europe.

My problem is choosing which OSS DB to help with. MySQL is the most popular, so getting involved with it would be most helpful to my employment prospects. But its list of fundamental design flaws seems so severe that I can't respect it as a database.

I'm attracted to the robust correctness requirements of PostgreSQL, but there don't seem to be many prospective employers using is. So while I'd enjoy working on it, I don't think it would be very helpful to my employment prospects.

Any suggestions?"
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Kickstarter for Linux version of Defense Grid 2

DoofusOfDeath DoofusOfDeath writes  |  more than 2 years ago

DoofusOfDeath (636671) writes "Awesome news for those of us who loved the game Defense Grid, and who wanted a sequel, and/or want to see more high-quality games on Linux. The developer of Defense Grid has started a Kickstarter project to develop Defense Grid 2. But even better for us Linux (and Mac) gamers, if they get to the $750,000 mark in contributions, they commit to a Mac and Linux port as well."
Link to Original Source
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Best country to avoid software patents?

DoofusOfDeath DoofusOfDeath writes  |  more than 2 years ago

DoofusOfDeath (636671) writes "What's the best country for computer scientists who just want to create, rather than worry about software patents?

Even though I'm nearly done with my PhD in computer science, I'm less enthusiastic than ever about my work, because of software patents. I used to be filled with wonder at the possibilities of what we could create with software, but now I just expect innovation to be rewarded with a patent lawsuit and crushing fines."
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Best way to store imporant personal data?

DoofusOfDeath DoofusOfDeath writes  |  more than 5 years ago

DoofusOfDeath (636671) writes "I'm about to digitize lots of old family photos and videos. At some point the digital versions will be the only ones we can find. What's the best way to store large amounts of personal data that's practical, affordable, and minimizes the risk of losing the data?"
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Google revoking DRM permissions on bought videos!

DoofusOfDeath DoofusOfDeath writes  |  more than 7 years ago

DoofusOfDeath (636671) writes "A few months ago I purchased a great Discovery Channel video from Google's downloadable video service. Sure I can't media-shift it, but I was willing to trade away some fair-use rights so my kids could see the video. I paid cash, they give me the video. End of story, right?

Wrong. Today I got this email (see below). It just goes to show that with DRM, there's little limit to the evil that can be done to you:

Hello,

As a valued Google user, we're contacting you with some important information about the videos you've purchased or rented from Google Video. In an effort to improve all Google services, we will no longer offer the ability to buy or rent videos for download from Google Video, ending the DTO/DTR (download-to-own/rent) program. This change will be effective August 15, 2007.

To fully account for the video purchases you made before July 18, 2007, we are providing you with a Google Checkout bonus for $20. Your bonus expires in 60 days, and you can use it at the stores listed here: http://www.google.com/checkout/signupwelcome.html. The minimum purchase amount must be equal to or greater than your bonus amount, before shipping and tax.

After August 15, 2007, you will no longer be able to view your purchased or rented videos.

If you have further questions or requests, please do not hesitate to contact us. Thank you for your continued support.

Sincerely,

The Google Video Team

Google Inc.
1600 Amphitheatre Parkway
Mountain View, CA 94043
"

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