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Comments

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Researchers Develop New Way To Steal Passwords Using Google Glass

Dr. Eggman Foiled By Password Safes (116 comments)

"I don't get it, almost all his passwords should be Shift+v! Why isn't this working?"

"Read out says CTRL+v, boss."

"Don't be stupid! It has to be Shift!"

about three weeks ago
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The Case Against Gmail

Dr. Eggman Re:iGoogle Disaster (435 comments)

Aw, yeah! You've done it again, Slashdot! Thanks, I've been putting off finding a decent iGoogle replacement. This will do quite nicely. Kind of wish I could find out more about the company behind it, though... Not quite ready to trust them enough to log in to gmail through their widget.

about 9 months ago
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Google: Our Robot Cars Are Better Drivers Than You

Dr. Eggman Grumble Grumble iGoogle, Google Reader, Desktop... (722 comments)

That's all well and good until you're given a notice that they will be shutting down the automated driving service because they have Google Taxi now.

about 9 months ago
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Lavabit, Email Service Snowden Reportedly Used, Abruptly Shuts Down

Dr. Eggman Troubling, whatever the reason it occurred (39 comments)

"Without the body and the mind, as all men know, the Nation could not live. But if the spirit of America were killed, even though the Nation's body and mind, constricted in an alien world, lived on, the America we know would have perished." ~Franklin D. Roosevelt's 3rd Inaugural address.

Regardless of whether this was the NSA strong-arming or a coincidental, legal FBI investigation, this is very troubling. How long will we let these government agencies do such harm to US IT businesses both big and small, let alone the very rights of its people? Every new instance bring seemingly irreparable harm to all three.

On the other hand, this report does smell suspiciously of a man trying to scare-up legal funds by capitalizing on current events. Does any one else get a weird John Galt vibe from this guy? Yet, it's clear that something very serious has happened here. I don't know what to think of the whole matter...

about a year ago
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I'd most rather, of the following, search with:

Dr. Eggman Re:Duck Duck Go (277 comments)

Yep. Use it all the time.

about a year ago
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US Mining Data Directly From 9 Silicon Valley Companies

Dr. Eggman Re:Bye bye Dropbox? (404 comments)

I've heard good things about SpiderOak. Can't say that I've ever used it myself, though.

about a year ago
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US Mining Data Directly From 9 Silicon Valley Companies

Dr. Eggman Sounds familiar (404 comments)

Suddenly, I don't feel like the FBI agent from this slashdot article was just exaggerating claims to drum up interest for in a book he wanted to release....

about a year ago
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Explosions at the Boston Marathon

Dr. Eggman Re:On TV now (1105 comments)

Funny, I couldn't help but wonder if it might have been caused by someone upset about the recent attempts at new gun control legislation by Congress. I can only hope everybody keeps a level head, regardless of what or who it turns out to be.

about a year ago
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Are Lenovo's ThinkPads Getting Worse?

Dr. Eggman Re:Forward-thinking, it is. (271 comments)

3 years? Lucky!

Now if you'll excuse me, this thing won't shovel coal into own hopper. Gotta keep its boiler goin' 'til its saved my spreadsheet!

about a year ago
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Laser Fusion Put On a Slow Burn By US Government

Dr. Eggman Re:Wait, what? (143 comments)

Tiny compared to most things on day-to-day human scales. Here's an image of the pellet.

As for the reaction itself (and I probably have this wrong, so please correct me if you discover so) it would, best-case, generate 100-150 MJ, but I read the target chamber's design only allows for 45 MJ (realistic expectations, I suppose?) That amounts to 11 kg of TNT (yes this is all paraphrased from Wikipedia.) Certainly tiny by the standards of fusion/fission, but quite huge considering the pellet above.

This might not seem like much, but it is a demonstrative design. Going for designs that would produce a practical commercial system at appreciable outputs would have been astronomically more expensive. Better to prove the concept first. Still more, this is a dual purpose facility; it's primary objective is stockpile stewardship. The potential for fusion research for commercial purposes is just added value.

about a year and a half ago
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Astronaut Neil Armstrong Has Died

Dr. Eggman Re:The final step for a man. (480 comments)

Beautiful sentiment. If only it were not just a day after my mod points expired... Mr. Armstrong will be greatly missed.

about 2 years ago
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Self-Guided Bullet Can Hit Targets a Mile Away

Dr. Eggman High Tech (421 comments)

At last, our technology is starting to catch up to 1940s cartoons! I can't wait for my portable hole...

more than 2 years ago
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Ask Slashdot: Does Europe Have Better Magazines Than the US?

Dr. Eggman Even PC Gamer (562 comments)

I bought a UK copy of PC Gamer recently when I heard they had a preview of Overgrowth in it. I was surprised to know that they'd have different content fro the US PC Gamer magazine, but I was shocked to find the entire magazine was bigger (like those old Life magazines in my grandparent's basement), longer, had many more features, and had a bonus disk. The US version looked positively emaciated next to it.

more than 2 years ago
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Paper On Super Flu Strain May Be Banned From Publication

Dr. Eggman Re:summary wrong (754 comments)

I suspect that isn't the only overwrought element here. In my, admittedly limited, search I have yet to find reputable sources confirming any but the barest of details in this story; let alone "Kill Half Humanity" (Wikipedia's already infected, care of rt.com.)

The Canadian Press, which brings us the Winnipeg Free Press article, fails to provide anything real to back up its statements. I can't really follow it any more than looking up the organizations provided and looking for related news postings (of which I found none.) Subsequent searching leads me to a Gizmodo article (links provided for those who wish to follow my searches.) Of it, there are two meaningful citations (that is, not links to the about pages of the source in question.) Science Insider and a pdf announcement detailing the schedule of the September influenza conference in Malta, in which this announcement is quoted as having been made.

The first thing I noticed within the pdf (aside from the garish design) is the absence of any announcement on GM influenza, (or Ron Fouchier, or his organization.) Admittedly, this hardly means this didn't occur; merely that this (what is essentially a flier) is not a meaningful source of information.

As for the Science Insider, it provides few additional details, mostly regarding vaguely related discussions on the classification/pre-approval of these sorts of studies. The closest thing it provides to something interesting is a (Dutch language) greenlight for what is supposed to be Ron's project.

Indeed, the Dutch link does concern GM influenza, and is an answer to a question on procedure for studying this sort of thing (of which they already apparently had a license to do.) It does not corroborate any of the stand out details of this article (how could it, considering it's from 2007.) Of minor note, there is no mention of ferrets; only standard embryonated [sic. Google Translation] chicken eggs.

Color me skeptical, to say the least.

more than 2 years ago
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NASA Creating Laser Communication System For Mars

Dr. Eggman Re:SETI implications (104 comments)

You can't take back what you broadcast. Radio wave communication is sufficiently simple that it's not all together unlikely other civilizations wouldn't have at least used it at some point. Sure, eventually they may move beyond it. However, if we're receiving their radio signals just now, it's quite plausible they are now far more advanced than us. But, at the same time, in the time it takes for the signals to reach us (assuming they're even powerful enough to not get lost in the background) they could have easily wipe themselves out.

more than 2 years ago
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Russia Approves Siberia-Alaska Railway

Dr. Eggman Symbolic of Unity (449 comments)

The cold war truly is over. I wonder how long until the US and Russia have a relationship like Britain and France.

Also: In Post-Soviet Russia, you link up transcontinental railway. In America, transcontinental railway links up you!

more than 2 years ago
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Native Apps Are Dead, Long Live Native Apps

Dr. Eggman Re:When all you have is a hammer... (168 comments)

I should clarify that. I meant Java as far as the technology stack goes. So, Richfaces, JSF, served up by Tomcat, backed by Java classes.

more than 3 years ago
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Native Apps Are Dead, Long Live Native Apps

Dr. Eggman Re:When all you have is a hammer... (168 comments)

I came off a project not long ago which involved a web app-running browser embedded in a native app. There was even a decent reason why: Users could pre-enroll online or walk-in at a dedicated station. Either way, the same steps had to be preformed at least once, before the rest of the application (which was native because it involved special hardware) did the rest.

All I can say was, it was...er, an experience.

To begin, the Web application was powered by Java while the Native application was run by C#/.Net. Don't let anyone tell you these two play nice, because they certainly don't; there were bizarre display issues present in the Native app that didn't happen in any other browser we were testing on (including IE.) Nevermind the challenges presented by getting the two applications to communicate and coordinate in order to provide a seamless integrated interface; we really should have relied more on Web Services than we did (but the reasons behind that are a whole other story.) Most importantly, in order to integrate the two well, you need a developer or developers who understand how to write good web apps as well as good native apps (also, in this case a developer who knows C# and Java, which I eventually came to.) I think you hit the nail on the head with your post; these are two very different things with their own strength domains. I'll just add that mixing them is questionable for most solutions, difficult for all of them (Fun, though!)

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

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Don't Forget: "Six Strikes" Starts this Weekend

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "If don't recall, then Broadband/DSL Reports is here to remind us that ISPs around the US will begin adhering to the RIAA/MPAA-fueled "Six Strikes" agreement on July 1st. Or is July 12th? Comcast, AT&T, Verizon and Cablevision are all counted among the participants. They will each introduce "mitigation measures" against suspected pirates, including: throttling down connection speeds and suspending Web access."
Link to Original Source
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Human Skin Cells Converted Directly to Neurons

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "Standford's School of Medicine brings us an update in the latest achievements towards in-vitro neuron generation via re differentiation of specialized cells (skin cells in this case.) This important progress follows on last year's success in inducing this change with mice skin cells.

The importance of this line of research lies in that the process does not need to first de-differentiate the skin cells into a kind of stem cells known as induced pluripotent stem cells. By skipping this phase, the process avoids potential problems in the body's rejection of the iPS cells.

Amazingly, the transformation occurs with the added presence of 4 proteins (one more protein than need to induce the effect in mice) over several weeks (compared to a few days in mice.) Research continues as the study highlights the significant differences in mice and human neural cells as well as the success rate of transformation (2-4% for human cells, 20% for mice.) The resultant cells aren't yet as capable as naturally derived neurons; generating less-robust electrical signals."

Link to Original Source
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Foraging Foxes Pouncing Preferences

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "A study, performed by team of researchers representing various biology and wildlife organizations in the Czech Republic, has noted that Red Foxes show preference for performing 'mousing' (or pouncing) attacks in a roughly north-eastern compass direction. The paper, published in the Biology Letters under Royal Society Publishing (with the free, full text available) speculates that the Fox may have a heretofore unheard of ability to use the Earth's magnetic field as a sort of ‘range finder.’

The technique of mousing is to jump high in the air to surprise the prey (physorg's coverage of the paper includes a video of the technique. Most importantly the attack is often carried out on prey under deep foliage coverage and even tunneling through snow (helping rule against visual perception.)

The study was carried out across 592 jumps-attacks by 84 wild red foxes in 65 localities in the Czech Republic. The study controlled for time of day, season, sex of the fox, age of the fox, and the human observer (23 experienced biologist took part in the study.) Even the direction of the wind was accounted for, which is important for discounting smell and auditory senses in the success probability of attacks (independent of finding a target for attack.) The end result showed that 74% of successful attacks in high cover were confined to a cluster centered about 20 clockwise of magnetic north with a 15% secondary cluster at due south, while attacks in other directions were largely unsuccessful. The Red Foxes preferences tended toward the more successful clusters. If the paper's proposed "magnetic targeting system" is indeed responsible, it would be the first such discovered biological use of magnetic alignment in mammals under the context of hunting."

Link to Original Source
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Building Babbage's Analytical Engine

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "Over 170 years after Charles Babbage first described his Analytical Engine, one man seeks to build it in details faithful to its creator's design. That man is John Graham-Cumming, who you may remember for his successful campaign to get Alan Turing an apology from the British Government or maybe you'd better know him for the open source POPFile email filter. Once built, the engine will be donated to a museum. But, in order to fund the construction of this steam-powered mechanical computer, an online pledge has been established. By signing, users pledge to donate at least $10 if enough signatures are reached. The process only requires a name and an email address and has already reached a phenomenal 3,479 signatories. If build, perhaps we can finally see Ada Lovelace's program run on the the machine it was built for. Slashvertisement? No, this is a Slashdrive!"
Link to Original Source
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Rat Lung Successfully Regenerated and Transplanted

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  about 4 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "Nature Medicine brings us news of the latest success in the regeneration of the gas exchanging tissues of the lungs of a rat. Led by Harald C. Ott, researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston used decellularization to produce a cellular scaffolding to serve as the basis of the transplant lungs. You may recall the previous achievements in use of this cellular scaffolding technique by Yale University. This latest announcement comes with the excellent news that the rat's airway and respiratory muscles performed the necessary ventilation (as a normal rat's would,) and that they provided gas exchange for up to 6 hours after extubation, up from the previous 2 hours. They eventually failed due to capillary leakage resulting in the accumulation of fluids in the lungs. Although there's much work to be done, as not all the cell types found in the lung were regenerated, Ott and his team remain optimistic and estimated we might see regenerated organs for use in human patients within 5 to 10 years.

Furthermore, physorg.com provides three excellent videos of the dry ventilation of a regenerated lung construct, Blood perfusion and ventilation, and the left lung's orthotopic transplantation."

Link to Original Source
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Synthetic Genome Drives Bacterial Cell

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "Physorg.com brings us news of a Synthetic Genome, produced by the J. Craig Venter Institute, being used in an existing bacterial cell for the first time. Using a combination of biological hosts, the technique produces short strings of DNA by machine which inserting them into yeast to be stitched together via DNA-repair enzymes. The medium sequences are passed into E. Coli and back into yeast. After three rounds, a genome of three million base pairs was produced.

Specifically, the genome of M. mycoides was synthesized from scratch. This synthetic genome was then inserted into the cells of a bacteria known as Mycoplasm capricolum. The result is a cell, driven by a Syntehtic Genome, producing not the protiens of Mycoplasm capricolum, but of M. mycoides. The institute has far reaching plans for it's synthetic life program, including designing algae that can capture carbon dioxide, make new hydrocarbons for refineries as well as making new chemicals or food ingredients and to speed up vaccine production."

Link to Original Source
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President Obama Wins Nobel Peace Prize

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "It was announcement today that the 2009 Nobel prize in Peace will be awarded to President Obama. The committee has been quoted in declaring the award was "for his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples." Exact details are scarce as this story continues to develope. Additional information on the Nobel Prize may be found here."
Link to Original Source
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Valve Declares Steamworks Makes DRM Obsolete

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "Valve has announced the availability of a complete suite of publishing and development tools in a new set of advanced features delivered in Steamworks, available free of charge to developers and publishers worldwide. Part of the new Steamworks suite, the Custom Executable Generation (CEG) technology, compliments already existing anti-piracy solution offered in Steamworks. A customer friendly approach to anti-piracy, CEG makes unique copies of games for each user allowing them to access the application on multiple machines without install limits and without having to install root kits on their PC.

New support for in-game downloadable Content(free or paid,) and matchmaking through a robust lobby system, shipped and tested in Left 4 Dead.

The Steamworks services are offered free of charge to developers and publishers around the world. In addition to the services added in this extension, Steamworks offers support for Steam Achievements, Steam Community, Auto Updating, Statistics, Steam Cloud and more. The Steamworks service is also fully integrated with Steam, but games using the Steamworks API do not have to use the Steam delivery platform."
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Artificial Muscles Surpass Biological Muscles

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "Ars Technica brings us news from a University of Texas research group which has developed a potentially major advance for prosthetic muscles. Carbon nanotube aerogel sheets stretch both in thickness and width when electric current is pumped into them. The current causes adjacent bundles of nanotubes to repel each other, forcing the gel as a whole to expand. While artificial muscles are not new, this construct holds amazing properties that place it far beyond any previous artificial muscle, even surpassing biological muscles in several categories while only falling just short of biological muscles in one.

With a surprisingly low density of about 1.5 mg/cm3 (cm-cubed, nearly as light as air,) just one gram of this material can cover an area of over 30 m2 (m-squared.) Their thickness can be reduced 400-fold, decreasing their overall volume. Their amazingly elastic, while having appropriate properties of hardness. The properties of the material remain relatively stable From 25C to over 1200C, far beyond what is possible for biological muscles.

While the artificial muscle is temperature-independent and superelastic and has high isometric stress-generation capability, they doesn't measure up to biological muscles in at least one way. Maximum work achieved for every cycle is 30 J/kg, while biological muscles can achieve 40 J/kg. Still, this remains a potent advancement for prosthetics today and perhaps holds great potential for artificial enhancement tomorrow."

Link to Original Source
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Wii Homebrew Cracks Latest Update

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "Ars Technica brings us news on the Wii homebrew front. As you may recall, recently firmware version 3.3 was released and countered the popular Twilight Hack. The update would check for corrupted save files and delete them, eliminating the ability to use the file for launching homebrew apps. However, already new holes have been found which allow the user to mask the altered save file as a normal file and continue use of the homebrew apps as usual."
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Amputee Sprinter Wins Olympic Appeal to Compete

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "Oscar Pistorius, a 21-year-old South African double-amputee sprinter, has won his appeal filed with the Court of Arbitration for Sport. This overturns a ban imposed by the International Association of Athletics Federations, and allows Mr. Pistorius the chance to compete against other able-bodied athletes for a chance at a place on the South African team for the Beijing Olympics. He currently holds the 400-meter Paralympic world sprinting record, but must improve on his time by 1.01 seconds to meet the Olympic qualification standard. However, even if Pistorius fails to get the qualifying time, South African selectors could add Oscar to the Olympic 1,600-meter relay squad."
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Spore Editor Available June 17th

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "Ars Technica heralds the coming of the creature editor for the highly anticipated Spore. A previously promised downloadable demo of the creature editor from the September 7th due game, will be available June 17th. Furthermore, a full version of the creature editor will appear as a standalone product at the same time for $10. ComputerandVideogames.com further illuminates the features of the creature editor, in a their article. According to EA:

"The demo lets players shape, paint and play with an unlimited number of creatures, using 25 percent of the creature-making parts from Spore. Gamers can then share these creations with their friends, including seamless uploads to YouTube."
"
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How to Stop Uwe Boll

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "Tired of hearing about Uwe Boll and his terrible game movies? Well, computerandvideogames.com brings us some interesting news. Uwe Boll has dismissed an online petition asking him to stop making movies for its palty 18,000 signitures. However, he says if the petition reaches one million, he will stop working on movies."
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CEO of Stardock says: Ignore the PC Pirates

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "Ars Technica brings us an insight from Brad Wardell, CEO of Stardock. Stardock has recently the surprisingly well recieved and highly rated Sins of a Solar Empire. Mr. Wardell has come to the conclusion that the pirates don't matter. This runs in striking contrast to Call of Duty 4 developer Infinity Ward's recent proclamation of troubling signs of PC slowing due to piracy. While having no CD copy protection, Sins of a Solar Empire has sold 200,000 copies in the first month of release and landed the #2 spot in Feburary best seller charts, just behind CoD 4 (sans Wal-Mart numbers.)

The way to make money in the world of PC gaming, according to Wardell, is to make sure many systems can play your games, while continuing to make them attractive. Find a market where people want to buy and support the games, and don't go by what the magazines and the blogs seem to think are the big name titles. Don't let people who aren't your audience control the titles you make, and ignore piracy.

The reason why we don't put copy protection on our games isn't because we're nice guys. We do it because the people who actually buy games don't like to mess with it. Our customers make the rules, not the pirates. Pirates don't count.
"
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Manmade Flood to Nourish Grand Canyon Ecosystem

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "The Associated Press brings us news of a flood in the Grand Canyon. This flood is no ordinary flood, however. This is a man-made flood released from the Glen Canyon Dam. The Dam is releasing four to five times its normal amount of water over the course of a three day artificial flood. Scientists are conducting this massive experiment in order to document and better understand the complex relation of the aquatic habitats, natural floods, and the sediment they bring. Floods no longer bring sediment to these parts of the canyon as the Dam keeps it locked up and released in small, drawn out intervals. The Dam prevents the floods from bringing the sediments into replenish the sandbars and allow the river to maintain its warm, murky habitat rather than a cool, clear one. It is thought that this cool clear environment brought on by the dam is responsible for helping to extinguish 4 species of fish and push 2 more towards the brink. It is hoped that this terra-reformation experiment will positively impact the habitat and fish populations, warranting further artificial floods at an increased rate of every one to two years rather than the time span between the two previous floods and this one of 8 and 4 years."
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Comcast, Net Advocates Face off as FCC Look On

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "Ars technica brings us an overview of the FCC Hearing on how to address concerns that Comcast and other ISPs degrade P2P traffic. The article, with MP3 audio clippings of the exchange, addresses Comcast Executive Vice President David L. Cohen's assertion that "Comcast does not block any Web site, application, or Web protocol, including peer to peer services. Period. Doesn't happen." as well as his 6 limitations to what they are doing. While net neutrality advocates where in strong attendance, Ars seems to think Cohen stole the show."
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CNN Peers into North Korea's Nuclear Facility

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "One of only two US new organizations invited to the event, CNN bring us a look into North Korea's Primary Nuclear Facility with an included video report. CNN comments on the dilapidated state of the facility as well as North Korea's current position on the "Axis of Evil." Given a view of the dismantling of the facility, CNN also reflects on the recent news of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra landing in Pyongyang; the first time a major U.S. cultural group has visited North Korea since the war in the early '50s."
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Comcast Sued over P2P Throttling, Again

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "Ars Technica brings us news of a disgruntled Washington D.C. Comcast customer who has filed a lawsuit against Comcast over claims of false advertising. The complaint seeks punitive damages, class-action status, and attorneys' fees. The customer claims Comcast advertised "unfettered access to all the content, services, and applications that the Internet has to offer." This may all sound familiar, but it's no dupe: Slashdot covered a remarkably similar previous lawsuit brought against Comcast by a Californian customer back in November. While Comcast would confirm reception of, but not comment on, the lawsuit, Comcast spokesman Charlie Douglas has stated: "To be clear, Comcast does not, has not, and will not block any Web sites or online applications, including peer-to-peer services, and no one has demonstrated otherwise.""
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Intel Purchases Offset Software

Dr. Eggman Dr. Eggman writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Dr. Eggman (932300) writes "Beyond3D brings us news of Intel's latest acquisition: the game development house Offset Software. Pre-GDC rumors supposed that Intel was possibly talking about purchasing game developer Crytek. While questions abound as to why Intel would purchase a small game developer, working on a promising 3D engine and game, some would point to Intel's enigmatic new graphics architecture, Larrabee. After all, what good would a graphics architecture, with tailor-made API, be without an impressive game/demo to take advantage of it and show it off?"

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