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How Amazon Keeps Cutting AWS Prices: Cheapskate Culture

DuckDodgers Re:could be blueray (145 comments)

Interesting, thanks for the link. But it's not clear to me that they have any way for the disks to last longer. Maybe this is a cost-controlling interim solution until they come up with anything better? The same article says they eventually want to use low power flash instead.

2 days ago
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Why There Are So Few ISP Start-Ups In the U.S.

DuckDodgers Re:Do you think we have ISP competition in the US? (223 comments)

The phone companies can compete with the cable companies already, and for the most part they don't compete. There may be no formal back room deals, but the phone companies and cable companies could be in a deadly battle for consumers with low prices and high bandwidth coming out and razor thin profit margins. Instead they make token gestures and compete in a few key markets, but prices and bandwidth have stagnated for more than five years.

4 days ago
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How Amazon Keeps Cutting AWS Prices: Cheapskate Culture

DuckDodgers Re:could be blueray (145 comments)

I used to use DVD-Rs for personal backups but unlike commercial DVDs, some of the disks started having read errors (despite very careful handling) after less than three years.

On the other hand, Amazon certainly has the resources to get whatever the hell it is the movie studios use to create the same Blu Ray disks you get when you buy Back to the Future on Blu Ray. I have yet to have a Blu Ray have a read error, and I've got a few dozen of them. So maybe Amazon uses that.

4 days ago
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How Amazon Keeps Cutting AWS Prices: Cheapskate Culture

DuckDodgers Re:AWS is NOT cheap (145 comments)

It's the scaling. If you have fixed resource requirements, set up your own servers in a good colocation somewhere. If you usually run with X server capacity but a few times a year or more you need 5X or 10X, go with AWS (or Google, Microsoft, Rackspace, DigitalOcean, etc.... )

4 days ago
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How Amazon Keeps Cutting AWS Prices: Cheapskate Culture

DuckDodgers Re:Cheapskate? (145 comments)

Outrage gets more visitors, which increases ad revenue. So 'frugal' became 'cheapskate' for the sake of a few extra dollars. Welcome to the modern internet, where the people who aren't launching flamewars as fast as they can lose their business to those that do.

4 days ago
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How Amazon Keeps Cutting AWS Prices: Cheapskate Culture

DuckDodgers Re:Business class is a misnomer (145 comments)

Or lose her because she quits to work for a company that has less travel.

4 days ago
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Why There Are So Few ISP Start-Ups In the U.S.

DuckDodgers Re:Not really, again see the phone companies (223 comments)

If you were correct in your analogy we would not have our current stagnation. At present, Compete.net decides to spend $10 million on lawyers and lobbyists to throw legal obstacles in front of potential adversaries to keep their effective regional monopoly and puts the other $55 million or $70 million it might have spent on network upgrades into profits, and lets their infrastructure continue to suck.

We still need a mixed public/private solution - regulation to keep the playing field open, and then competition on that open playing field. Pure private and pure public both lead to stagnation (even if the pure private solution stagnation is actually accomplished by having the private companies influencing public policy).

about two weeks ago
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Study: Exposure To Morning Sunlight Helps Managing Weight

DuckDodgers Re:correlation does not prove causation (137 comments)

The article says "independent of activity level, sleep, and eating habits", so even people who eat and sleep the same amount and went jogging later in the afternoon were heavier.

But I think the study size is too small and the duration too short to mean anything.

about two weeks ago
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MIT Researchers Create Platform To Build Secure Web Apps That Never Leak Data

DuckDodgers Re:I've implemented something similar (90 comments)

You won't see it implemented in free services for the reasons you describe. But it could work as a pay service. Most people will skip that in favor of free services that scrape their data, but some might.

I'm tempted to rent a server from Amazon or DigitalOcean or whoever and put the application on it myself, so I can access my data from anywhere without dealing with advertisements and privacy concerns.

about three weeks ago
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JavaScript Inventor Brendan Eich Named New CEO of Mozilla

DuckDodgers Re:Javascript: the worst Internet development. (112 comments)

He had nine days to invent the language. I doubt there are more than a handful of computer scientists in the world that could invent a good language that fast.

And the reason C++ became so popular is the migration path from pure C code and the migration path for pure C developers. The reason Java became so popular is marketing and the syntactical similarities with C and C++. Javascript piggybacked on that, and now it's everywhere. We will never be rid of it, your dream of a superior replacement will never take off because there's no practical migration path from Javascript to wherever it is you want the world to go.

about three weeks ago
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OpenSUSE 13.2 To Use Btrfs By Default

DuckDodgers Re:Standards? Standards anyone? (91 comments)

I'm sorry if my post was a little confusing - I don't consider ZFS experimental either. I meant that ZFS is a commonly used Unix filesystem that has more features than ext4, and it can't be part of the Linux kernel. btrfs is an attempt to bring ZFS to Linux without violating any software licenses.

I didn't know about LVM snapshots, thanks for informing me. I also didn't realize LVM supports adding and removing storage devices to the volume while the system is live. I considered snapshots and growth and shrinking of storage the two killer btrfs features, and now I see that one can get those from LVM + ext4.

Okay, I find the argument for adapting btrfs as a primary filesystem weaker. I hope there's something I'm missing.

about three weeks ago
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OpenSUSE 13.2 To Use Btrfs By Default

DuckDodgers Re:An inspiring decision (91 comments)

Very cool, thanks for letting me know about that.

about three weeks ago
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Oppo's New Phone Hits 538 PPI

DuckDodgers Re: approximately the resolution of an adult eye @ (217 comments)

Someone upthread made the comment that 300 dpi is the limit of human vision for detail [i]assuming the print is 24 inches or further away in a magazine or newspaper or screen[/i]. I think that explains the other person's confusion.

about a month ago
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Oppo's New Phone Hits 538 PPI

DuckDodgers Re: approximately the resolution of an adult eye @ (217 comments)

I bought one of those comically large phones for exactly this reason. I want to be able to read it at arm's length, and I can. I figured if I had a smaller screen and spent too much time hunched over squinting at the thing, I would end up squatting in a corner somewhere muttering that some tricksy person stole the precious.

about a month ago
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Oppo's New Phone Hits 538 PPI

DuckDodgers Re: approximately the resolution of an adult eye @ (217 comments)

I believe you, though I have no formal knowledge about this. To me the other specs are more interesting - cross-provider LTE, potentially the new standard bearer for best Android smartphone camera, first Android phone (to my knowledge) with 3GB of RAM.

On the other hand, even with 300 dpi that puts the requirements for a screen pretty high, right? I mean the mainstream flagship Android phones these days have a 4.7 inch screen on bigger. If that's 2.5 inches horizontal and 4.0 inches vertical then 300 dpi requires just under 1280x800. For a screen with a 5.5 inch display to pass the 300 dpi threshold you need something between 1280x800 and 1920x1080. I'm not aware of many screens with non-standard display resolutions between those two points. So this 2560 by whatever may be marketing overkill for a phone this big, but full 1080p for phones with screens 5 inches or larger might actually make sense (?)

about a month ago
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OpenSUSE 13.2 To Use Btrfs By Default

DuckDodgers Re:Standards? Standards anyone? (91 comments)

The ZFS filesystem from Solaris Unix has some features that ext4 does not, especially filesystem snapshots. That gives you the ability to take a filesystem snapshot at a certain date, and if the system has a filesystem problem in the future that is not from a hardware failure, you can instantly revert your filesystem to the snapshot. Here's a common use case: you take a snapshot, then apply a software upgrade to your system. If the upgrade goes well, you snapshot again. If the upgrade fails, you revert to the original snapshot and the system acts as if the failed upgrade never happened.

This is one of the reasons so many big companies use Solaris Unix. Unfortunately, the software license of ZFS prevents it from being incorporated into the Linux kernel by default. You have to download and install it separately.

Adding that feature to ext4 without completely rewriting it is impossible. That's why btrfs was created, to give many of the good features of ZFS to Linux. The thing is, btrfs needs to be battle-tested before businesses will use it on mission critical servers. You have to start somewhere. Maybe OpenSUSE 13.2 is too soon, maybe it needs another few years as alpha software. But maybe all of the people on this forum complaining about file corruption ran into bugs that have already been patched.

about a month ago
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OpenSUSE 13.2 To Use Btrfs By Default

DuckDodgers Re:An inspiring decision (91 comments)

I can't speak to its reliability because I only used it a little bit. But in terms of features, from what I understand it the two killer features that slow btrfs down by make it so attractive (assuming it doesn't corrupt your files) are snapshots and live volume resizing. Those two things do what you might from the name - snapshots let you tag a certain point in time in the filesystem, and in the future you can revert your filesystem to look exactly as it did at that point in time. That is of course incredibly handy in the case of failed upgrades or accidental file deletions. Live volume resizing lets you grow and shrink partitions and I believe even add an additional storage device to an existing btrfs volume while the system is still mounted.

I think the slowdown versus ext4 is measurable but not killer, 5-10%. I'm more concerned with the stability.

about a month ago
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Ubuntu's Mir Gets Delayed Again

DuckDodgers Re:This could be good news... (241 comments)

I had not seen any assertion that Wayland would not work with Android GPU drivers. I don't understand the architecture of X, Wayland, and Mir. As I just wrote elsewhere, the only not-totally-vague explanation of technical differences between Wayland and Mir that I've seen is this: http://blog.cooperteam.net/201... If the author of that post is correct, then Mir has a resource management advantage over Wayland in resource-constrained environments. That doesn't matter if you're getting a $600 on-contract phone in the first world but it's a very big deal if Canonical is trying to enter the middle and low end first world market or any portion of the third world market with Ubuntu Touch.

But again, I don't know if the writer is correct about the details - and it's possible Wayland has some other effectively equivalent way of handling resources.

about a month ago
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Ubuntu's Mir Gets Delayed Again

DuckDodgers Re:This could be good news... (241 comments)

I don't understand enough of the technical differences between Mir and Wayland to make a real argument. The only technical post I read about Mir that wasn't too vague to be useful was this one: http://blog.cooperteam.net/201...

I'm not saying Wayland cannot work well on ARM devices, if the Raspberry Pi can run X than certainly a Nexus 5 can run Wayland. But if that post isn't full of nonsense, then properly configured Mir will work more efficiently than Wayland in an environment like that.

about a month ago
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Ubuntu's Mir Gets Delayed Again

DuckDodgers Re:wrong (241 comments)

Most of the supercomputers in the world are built using Linux. Are you saying that Linux is used in those machines strictly because of commercial Unix licensing costs?

about a month ago

Submissions

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Potential database breakthrough

DuckDodgers DuckDodgers writes  |  more than 4 years ago

DuckDodgers writes "The database company Ingres announced a partnership with research firm Vectorwise to bring to market an efficiency breakthrough in databases. They assert that most complex queries run by a database engine can run over 100 times slower than a C++ program hand coded to get the same information from the files on disk. They're working on a database engine that closes the gap dramatically by using several methods, like batching tuples for processing in sizes that fit in the processor on-chip cache, other methods for minimizing back and forth between RAM and processor cache, and structuring the data to be processed in a way to make best use of CPU branch prediction. Their example in the whitepaper (unfortunately, it requires registration) is a moderate complexity aggregate query against 6 million rows of data that takes 16 seconds in the regular database engine, 0.04 seconds with a C++ application built to do the same thing, and about 0.2 seconds with their optimized database engine. The press release is here, and some of the technical details are discussed on this blog (no, not mine): Next Big Future. Is this impossible, impractical, or well within the realm of possibility? If it can be done, why haven't we seen it before?"

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