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PC Gaming Alive and Dominant

Dutch Gun Re:Not True (244 comments)

If you fail to deliver on your promised, you won't be able to easily earn back people's trust

So the next kickstarter campaign is in your girlfriend's name.

Do you want me to find examples of people who have gone back to the kickstarter well and never really delivered?

No, not really. Honestly, I don't really care why you seem to dislike crowdsourcing so much. I'm not the person to defend it, as I neither use it nor contribute to other projects. It just seems like you have to consider the source of those projects very carefully - that's up to the individual contributors, but that seems like common sense to me.

Incidentally, although I'm an indie developer (as one would define it),

Great. Then maybe you can explain why it seems impossible for new companies to produce something at the level of Half-Life, the Burnout series, etc etc. Games that people want to put over 100 hours into. Valve and Criterion were relatively small and little-known "indie" companies when those games were made. Why do game developers seem so allergic to giving good value for the price of their game. And why do so many have such low opinions of their own games that they go F2P? Are there no developers who realize just how badly that genre sucks?

You're essentially asking "Why aren't all games as good as the best ones ever made?" Is that something I can even answer? Why aren't all composers Mozart? Why aren't all directors Steven Spielberg?

80% of everything is crap, and that includes games. Of the 20% that isn't crap, only a small percentage will rise to the very top, and probably make everything else look bad by comparison, even though they're probably not.

Making games is harder than most gamers think, incidentally. To make a top-notch game, you need a fusion of talented programmers, game designers, artists, plus (and this is probably the rarest) enough financial backing and managerial foresight to see a project all the way through to it's true completion, not just when the contract says it's due. Incidentally, that's not the same as giving developers unlimited time and money, because that can bankrupt companies. To me, it's a miracle that as many high-quality games are released as there are, since I've seen how incredibly hard they are to make first-hand.

3 days ago
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PC Gaming Alive and Dominant

Dutch Gun Re:Not True (244 comments)

Oh don't worry, Bungie lost it's vitality alright when they sold to Microsoft. Many people don't realize that Bungie is this old because before becoming an Xbox developer they were Mac exclusive developpers.

Yeah, they were getting the life sucked out of them by Microsoft, being asked to do nothing but Halo sequels. They seem to have regained some vitality since splitting with MS though, which is what I was sort of inferring.

4 days ago
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PC Gaming Alive and Dominant

Dutch Gun Re:Not True (244 comments)

Yeah, you're correct that "venture capitalism" is a bad analogy. It is true that you're betting your own capital, but your only potential return is a good game, and maybe some extra freebies. Minupla below gives a much better analogy as "patronage", as there's often a desire to see a specific vision come to fruition. It's not a perfect analogy, but probably a bit better than mine. Of course, any comparison or analogy is going to be flawed in some way, because crowd-funding is a rather unique mechanism for funding development.

Incidentally, although I'm an indie developer (as one would define it), I'm not taking money from crowdfunding. I saved up for many years working for established game development companies and am now self-funding my own game at a tremendous cost and my own financial risk. I've never been to an indie developer conference, in fact. I'm a professional game developer who just happens to be working on my own right now, and I'm betting my financial future on the fact that my game will be fun and engaging to play.

Keep in mind that crowdfunding is not a "get money for free" scheme. You have to pay all those people back with promised products of some sort, which work against your own future earnings. If you fail to deliver on your promised, you won't be able to easily earn back people's trust, and your venture will likely fail. I'm sure there are some people who have taken advantage of the system, but there are also other developers who are working long days and nights on their own in order to produce a viable product that others will enjoy.

4 days ago
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Titanfall Dev Claims Xbox One Doesn't Need DX12 To Improve Performance

Dutch Gun Re:Problem with releasing an underpowered console (117 comments)

Neither console is really "next-gen", that would have been 4K resolution.

I would have been happy with true 1080p resolution. How many people actually have 4K TVs at this point? Not nearly enough to support that in a console designed for the masses, at least. 4K is pretty demanding even for PC videocards. That would have pushed the cost up by several hundred bucks with absolutely no benefit for the majority of customers.

Still, it's not like we could have expected the same massive leaps in visual quality from previous generations. After all, the 360/PS3 generation was already closing in on photo-realistic quality given ideal circumstances, so there's no helping that. From here on out, improvements to visual quality will be less noticeable even for relatively large increases in processing power. 4K takes approximately 16x the processing power to achieve (at least in terms of fill rate), but of course it really doesn't look 16x as good as 1080 resolution.

Despite my grumblings, for me it's still about the games and not really the eye candy, even though comparing transistor counts and internal resolution seems to get the press all hot and bothered. I'll probably buy the first console has an epic, must-play RPG on it, as that's definitely my favorite genre.

4 days ago
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PC Gaming Alive and Dominant

Dutch Gun Re:Not True (244 comments)

Some old icons in the industry are now past their prime. Blizzard, Bioware, and id, longstanding favorites of mine, have all sold out. I'll no longer expect anything great from them, although I'm always willing to be surprised. Instead, younger and hungrier development shops will take their place... maybe ArenaNet and Bungie.

Uhh... Bungie is only 3 months younger than Blizzard. If you want to be pedantic, though, Blizzard Entertainment proper is actually the younger studio.

Yeah, you're right. After I posted that, I realized that "younger" wasn't really the proper term for describing Bungie, as they've been around for quite a while now too. Maybe it's just because it feels to me like Blizzard has lost it's vitality since getting swallowed up by Activision, while I don't necessarily get that feeling from Bungie.

4 days ago
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The Case For a Safer Smartphone

Dutch Gun Safer phones? Seriously? (184 comments)

People need to stop distracting themselves while driving. Better yet, make sure that anyone who causes damage, injury, or deaths due to their negligence while driving is fully prosecuted under the law. It's no different than driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Driving a vehicle requires responsibility as a driver.

Let's not kid ourselves. People will just root their phones and bypass any restrictions put in place to block access to the phone while driving. And how the hell would a phone know the difference between a passenger sitting in a car and a driver?

At it's heart, this really isn't a technology problem, but a societal one. We need to crack down on this sort of stuff, so people understand that it's simply not worth the risk to break the law. It would be awesome if software or hardware could fix all those meatware-related problems, but that's not the world we live in.

5 days ago
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PC Gaming Alive and Dominant

Dutch Gun Re:Not True (244 comments)

IMO, we've never had more choices or viable platforms as gamers - my first console was an Odyssey 2, and my first computer gaming was on an Apple II+, so I've been doing this a while now. Anyone who is longing for days long gone really needs to take off the rose-coloured glasses. Most of those older games were, if you look at it objectively, pretty trite and repetitive by today's standards. They were amazing to us largely because of their novelty, and we've elevated them on the pedestal of nostalgia.

Nothing against the classics - they were amazing for their day, but I do think a bit of perspective is in order. When I was a kid, I would have killed for an amazing RPG like Skyrim, or an MMO like Guild Wars 2, or for the sheer creativity to be found in Minecraft. I picked up Limbo the other day, and have been immensely enjoying myself - it's an incredibly clever and atmospheric platformer/puzzler. I'm still playing Puzzle Quest too, a relatively low-budget but fun puzzle-RPG hybrid. More recently, I've been going through my "bought a while ago but haven't played" list like Halo 4 and Uncharted 3, and on the PC side recently picked up The Witcher 1 & 2 in a Steam deal. I've enjoyed all these games immensely so far.

Granted, there's a lot of crap out there too. Freemium games? Yeah, I stay the hell away from those too. But I don't see how crowdfunding can be blamed when it's simply opened up the market to more niche games. Sure, some of those bets won't pay off, but welcome to venture capitalism. I'm not sure how that should be a surprise to anyone. 80% of everything is crap, anyhow. It holds true now, and it was true in the past as well. You just need to look for the products that rise to the surface... you know, read reviews, judge based on developer history.

Some old icons in the industry are now past their prime. Blizzard, Bioware, and id, longstanding favorites of mine, have all sold out. I'll no longer expect anything great from them, although I'm always willing to be surprised. Instead, younger and hungrier development shops will take their place... maybe ArenaNet and Bungie. And garage development is no longer relegated to the past either thanks to crowdfunding and improvement in tools, technology, and especially distribution platforms.

Personally, I think it's a pretty exciting time for the gaming industry, and I'm happy I'm in the middle of it.

5 days ago
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NSA Allegedly Exploited Heartbleed

Dutch Gun Re:It's time we own up to this one (149 comments)

In the process of rewriting, it's inevitable that a ton of brand-new bugs will be introduced in the new codebase, and you'll have lost all the time and effort hardening the library and fixing all of the thousands of previously exploitable issues.

I think talk of scrapping or rewriting the library is a bit of an overreaction caused by the scale and scope of the issue, and is certainly not plausible in the short term anyhow. I'd say the proper thing to do is to halt development of new features for a time and investigate the viability of addressing some of the underlying issues that have been pointed out which may have contributed to this bug: Remove the custom memory allocator, or ensure it's off by default. Start writing and using a proper unit test and fuzz testing framework. Document and clean up source with proper variable names and comments to make things easier for those reviewing/auditing code. Make sure the library compiles cleanly. Pay more attention to code that dynamically allocates memory or accepts data from user. Create a better review process. Etc, etc.

Every time I make a programming mistake or introduce a bug, I ask myself "What could I have done that would have prevented this from happening in the first place? What can I realistically do now to make sure it doesn't happen again?" The OpenSSL team really needs to be asking themselves these questions right now.

Note that questions like these have to be addressed in a realistic manner as well. "It needs to be thrown out and rewritten from scratch" or "we shouldn't be using C in the first place" are not realistic solutions. Whatever merits Ada has as a language (as one example I've heard), it's simply not going to replace C as a low-level systems and library language anytime in the near future. Language choice is also impacted by issues such as efficiency, programmer availability, interoperability, shared libraries and sample/test code availability, and so on.

I don't think this is the time to throw hyperbolic accusations or wildly impractical "solutions" around. It's a great time for some serious introspection and development process review, however, not only for the OpenSSL team, but for any sort of project like theirs with similar responsibilities. Even conservative fields of study such as civil engineering have had their spectacular disasters/failures. The thing to do is to assess the situation, learn from your mistakes, and then rigorously apply what you've learned so that you don't make those same mistakes again. It often takes a serious catalyst for that to happen, so in some ways, perhaps we should be glad that this happened sooner rather than later.

5 days ago
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Windows 8.1 Update Released, With Improvements For Non-Touch Hardware

Dutch Gun Re:A patch closer to usability, few more to go (294 comments)

Actually that's the planned idea, that when "win9" rolls out that's the "eol" for 32bit.

I'd love to see a source for that assertion you're making. There are hundreds of thousands of legacy 32-bit Windows apps that users continue to rely on. MS is not simply going to "eol" them starting with Windows 9. Seeing how near-perfect 32-bit compatibility is already built into both Windows as well as all modern 64-bit processors, they would have to actively remove that existing feature to break compatibility in the future. Why in world would they do that and destroy their own OS's ecosystem? That just makes no sense to me.

Straight C++ is effectively platform agnostic, and that includes 32/64-bit flavors of Windows, of course. As I mentioned, I can compile my game for either 32-bit or 64-bit platforms without any changes to the source code. That's what I meant by "flip a switch" - I didn't mean using the same binary, in case that wasn't clear (you're correct in that regard). A better way to phrase it would be "flip a switch and recompile the project".

about a week ago
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Windows 8.1 Update Released, With Improvements For Non-Touch Hardware

Dutch Gun Re:A patch closer to usability, few more to go (294 comments)

No I'm not misunderstanding. You're simply not paying attention to what's going on. There's a difference between an emulation layer, and native support. Currently we have multiple flavors of OS's with native support in either flavor, in a few years we're going to have a single flavor of OS support with an extreme drop off in support for x32. We're already seeing this in gaming with x32 binaries being thrown into the trashbin, and the entire codebase thrown and ditched. The most recent example in gaming of zero x32 support is Watch Dogs for the PC.

Your post seemed to imply that 32-bit apps would fail to run in Windows 9, which is simply not the case. Also, I fail to see the problem with the world moving to 64-bit native OSes with a 32-bit compatibility mode. And what do you mean "an extreme dropoff" of support? 32-bit applications run flawlessly under 64-bit Windows. It's not some soft of half-assed software emulation. 64-bit processors still support the original x86 instruction sets all the way back to the original 8086 and executes those natively. The emulation layer (Windows on Windows) is for the Windows API, not for the binary's instruction set, so it's fairly minimal in terms of overhead.

Also, you seem to be under the impression that you need to completely rewrite your game engine for 64-bits, which isn't true. My current game engine is both 64-bit and 32-bit compatible with zero differences in the codebase itself. Simply throw a switch in the configuration and it's done. There's some types of code you do have to actually port, such as inline assembly, which is not allowed in 64-bit, or any tricks using pointers that rely on a 32-bit size, but for most C/C++ code, there's no difference at all if written correctly. If a game company decides to abandon 32-bit platforms, it's because they've determined that the market can now move ahead with 64-bit platform. This allows them to push beyond the 2GB memory limit of 32-bit applications, which is becoming a serious bottleneck for modern PC games (we had to work pretty hard on my last commercial title to fit in this limit).

Anyhow, I'm not quite sure of your overall point. Do you feel that MS should continue releasing 32-bit operating systems even though there are no 32-bit-only processors being manufactured for desktop or laptop computers, and haven't been for years?

about a week ago
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Study: Video Gamer Aggression Result of Game Experience, Not Violent Content

Dutch Gun Re:Nintendo Hard (179 comments)

Search youtube for "wii remote accident"

Different cause and effect.

Rage -> Throw controller through wall.
Throw Wii remove through wall -> Rage

about two weeks ago
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Windows 8.1 Update Released, With Improvements For Non-Touch Hardware

Dutch Gun Re:Why are you using the touch interface with a mo (294 comments)

Still worse than Win7:

1. Click Start Button
2: Click Shut Down

But it's the content of the steps you provide and not even their number which cause the consternation with Windows 8. What about the bottom right corner is so magical that it compels people to move their mouse there in the first place to discover this menu? What about "Settings" would lead people to believe that this is where the power control is? Yes, these are easily learned, but the more of these non-intuitive steps there are, the more frustrating things are for the user. I remember how frustrated I was trying to figure out how to shut down a full screen metro app for the first time.

The best user interfaces have a sense of intuitive discovery about them. Have you ever been to a "mystery meat" website? That's where the designer was being hip and minimalistic, and forced the user to hover over a bunch of obscure icons to figure out what the hell each one of those do before they click. Generally speaking, it's a usability disaster that no serious web designer would make today, yet Microsoft managed to do exactly this.

That's why the "Start" menu worked so well when when it was introduced in Windows 95 and continued forward. It was a reliable fallback for users in order to access all functionality on their computer. Not necessarily the fastest or most efficient, but it was all right there, easily discoverable with few clicks right from there. Every application, every computer setting one would commonly use, and yes, also functionality for shutting down the computer. At the time, the start button got some mild ribbing for being the method used for shutting down your computer, but by and large, that was largely just playing for laughs.

When I bought a mac mini recently and used OSX for the first time (I hadn't used an Apple computer since my Apple II+), my experience was completely different. Everything was slightly unfamiliar, but it was a gorgeous visual experience and not at all hard to figure out because of the shared paradigm of most all modern desktop environments (closing a window - I'll guess the red X in the upper left corner). Once I wrapped my head around a few conceptual differences (such as the top-most window, and the separation between the app window and instance), I pretty much felt at home.

It's pretty incredible to me that, as a longtime Windows user (since 3.0), I felt roughly the same level of discomfort when learning an entire new operating system as when simply upgrading from Windows 7 to Windows 8, which has never happened before. In previous version upgrades, I always felt like the UI was evolving and improving for the better (like with the Windows 7 taskbar - only took me a day or two and I fell in love with it). In OSX, I don't feel like I'm being bludgeoned with an IOS-wanna-be interface every time I have to start up an application or perform any sort of OS-related task. Apple understands that these are two wildly different computing paradigms. Why didn't MS figure this out?

about two weeks ago
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Windows 8.1 Update Released, With Improvements For Non-Touch Hardware

Dutch Gun Re:A patch closer to usability, few more to go (294 comments)

Yep. I'll skip Win8 altogether, I think, and wait for 9.

Don't worry, I'm sure you'll enjoy the bitching and moaning when Win9 is released since it's supposed to be x64 only. Just imagine the whining and crying... "Y U NO SUPPORT x32!!!1111ELEVENTYONE1111!!!" Oh I can see it now...good times, it's just going to be like the nuts who couldn't be bothered to build/buy a new $250 PC and move to Win7 away from XP, you know the ones who only use their PC's for email and browsing. And then cry about the EoL for XP...and the 4 year extension date they got. It *might* almost be as good as when we dumped the old 16-bit legacy code...maybe...might even be better.

You're misunderstanding... a 64-bit OS doesn't mean 32-bit code won't run. It's nothing like when 16-bit legacy code was ditched - there was comparatively little of it in the real world compared to the overwhelming volume of modern Windows software that is still 32-bit, and there were good security-related reasons to ditch that compatibility layer. The 32-bit Windows emulation layer is probably going to be around for decades to come.

about two weeks ago
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Windows 8.1 Update Released, With Improvements For Non-Touch Hardware

Dutch Gun Re:It's a start (294 comments)

THIS!

The Ribbon is an eye-candy solution to a problem that only existed in focus groups. Microsoft may have been legitimately worried that OpenOffice and others were encroaching on its turf, productivity apps increasingly looking the same, and wanted something to look new and different. And that's fine, but they made it mandatory, and also yanked the menus and other, customizable interfaces people had gotten used to for getting their work done.

Seriously, a very important feature of Microsoft products was the ability to customize them to a particular job or work environment. That's one way businesses got locked into Microsoft.

The ribbon shot that in the foot at the expense of precious screen space. Shills and trolls just say "learn something new". Thousands of offices still using Office 2003 respond "we're real productive with what we've got, and don't have down-time to gamble on something new." Microsoft has it backward. You don't fish for one or two consumers who want a pretty ribbon to buy one license... you cater to what businesses need, and sell site-licenses at tens, hundreds, thousands of seats at a time. Then, the consumer will buy a copy because that's what he or she trained on at work.

But that's Office. Sticking the ribbon into the File/Windows Explorer is just weird, like an attempt to brand everything in some effort to evangelize one-interface-to-rule-them-all, as if putting it everywhere is going to make people like it. I'm hoping Microsoft is gonna stop forcing it's homegrown ideas down people's throats, and get back to making software people actually want to use to get work done. Clue: busy people don't have time to participate in focus groups.

The ribbon make sense for Office, IMO, although obviously not everyone will like such a significant change. It took a bit for me to get used to, but I didn't mind so much. That being said, I can empathize with many power users who feel like the rug was pulled out from under them since they had to retrain themselves for the new paradigm. Unlearning old habits is often harder then learning from scratch.

Ribbons do have some actual practical advantages over menus and toolbars. They dynamically and predictably scale to fill available screen space, they can provide more detailed and context-sensitive on-screen cues than traditional fixed-sized toolbar buttons and controls, and are generally more easily discoverable than multi-nested menus. While it's true they do potentially use more screen space, you have to weigh that against the general increasing trend of desktop resolutions and what benefits the new UI provides. I'm pretty sure the designers understood that it would cause short-term pain in the hopes that it would provide longer-term usability benefits.

That being said, I completely agree that adding a ribbon to file explorer is questionable judgement at best. There's no good reason to use a ribbon there - for smaller applications, ribbons don't provide any real advantage - they're a solution to a very specific issue (massive complexity) the office team was trying to combat. In fact, they ignored their own interface guidelines in this regard, when they note that a ribbon control isn't a good fit for every application. When a ribbon was proposed, someone should have asked "Why? What problems currently exist with the menu and toolbars that a ribbon would solve?" As controversial as the Office ribbons were, I could understand why there was design pressure for an improved paradigm with it's near-overwhelming complexity.

about two weeks ago
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What's In a Username? the Power of Gamer Tags

Dutch Gun Re:I need a handle, man (99 comments)

Whenever I see a name like DarkFyre, SoulRe4ver, or some other ridiculously angsty and pretentious name, you can bet it's a 12-15 yr old boy who thinks that name he came up with is the coolest thing ever. Bonus points if he's created a logo with black, red, and flames of any sort. I have fun imagining how embarrassed he'll be of that handle a few years from now.

I mean, admit it. When you were 13 you thought "DarkFyre" was a pretty awesome name too, right?

about two weeks ago
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London Council Dumping Windows For Chromebooks To Save £400,000

Dutch Gun Re:All that is left (193 comments)

-7.5% compound annual growth rate is massive, especially considering the growth rate of smartphones, tablets and chromeos. And that is not even taking into account the likelihood of productivity apps showing up on chromeos and android to further accelerate the trend. IDC's numbers are basically just talking about people who defect because they care more about media consumption than spreadsheets. That's a relatively small hole in the Windows bucket compared to having the whole bottom fall out when Android moves into the office.

I don't really see how productivity apps on tablets can replace actual PCs running actual business software within a corporate environment. Productivity software on a tablet means that you can access/view/share corporate documents perhaps, but create them? I'm not sure what you use a computer for in your work day, but I certainly couldn't possibly use a tablet to do my work. There's a LOT of business software out there that will simply never be ported to another OS either, and until it's depreciated completely, Windows will be around in force.

It seems safer to bet on what's already proven and established, especially when you're talking about rather conservative customers like businesses. Like I mentioned earlier, you can barely wean those guys off XP or IE6, and you're talking about a pretty radical jump in technology. I'm afraid I just don't buy it. Of course, I'm just guessing about the future like everyone else is, and could be totally wrong, but people have been predicting the imminent death of MS for years, yet they're still a behemoth, and still very relevant.

about two weeks ago
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Brendan Eich Steps Down As Mozilla CEO

Dutch Gun Re:I think this is bullshit (1746 comments)

People like him never know the meaning of words they use... they just use them because they know that their brain dead, head up ass friends will agree with them.

Socialism is less-advanced communism, often described by early communist practitioners and advocates as an intermediate stage between capitalism and communism. Both systems advocate social ownership of the means of production. Communism differs by degree, as it aims to completely re-invent society in some rather fundamental ways (i.e. ultimately wages are no longer paid, for instance).

While I'd love to hear your thoughts on the matter and how they differ from mine, I'd imagine you'd rather just call me (and apparently my friends, too) disparaging names.

about two weeks ago
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Brendan Eich Steps Down As Mozilla CEO

Dutch Gun Re:I think this is bullshit (1746 comments)

...or Totalitarianism, which is what he's actually describing.

You actually got my point (sort of), which is that communism in name often turns into what is effectively totalitarianism. Socialism and communism aren't precisely of course, but share some significant traits - namely, a significant amount of state control over means of production.

about two weeks ago
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London Council Dumping Windows For Chromebooks To Save £400,000

Dutch Gun Re:All that is left (193 comments)

The market is significantly broadening, no doubt, to include non-desktop/laptop computing platforms

Read the next sentence please. I'm not disagreeing with you, but all these starry-eyed predictions I've heard from the media / tech bloggers that the desktop will practically disappear completely is nonsense. The reason the desktop market is declining is that many light computing tasks (essentially, simple communication or the consumption of content) can be accomplished much better by phones and tablets, which are obviously a lot cheaper and more convenient than computers. These are the computers of the masses for the future.

However, when you need to create content (i.e. get real work done), you use a netbook, a laptop, or a desktop. When you don't need mobility, such as at home or work, or need the most powerful CPU/GPU available, then the desktop still makes the most sense, both ergonomically and economically. I don't see any viable replacement for desktop computers on the horizon, so it will remain a decent market, albeit more specialized than before. And unless there's some sort of radical shakeup, we'll still be seeing Windows there as a major player for a long time.

The media keeps playing up the "death of the desktop", but what we're seeing is a simple market adjustment. It doesn't mean the desktop is going to disappear by any means. Microsoft can do quite well relying on nothing but their desktop / laptop sales if they so desired, but obviously they realize it's a declining market, so are (somewhat unsuccessfully so far) scrambling to stay relevant in the tablet/mobile space as well. Even if those efforts flop, they're going to remain a behemoth (like IBM), but will simply be far less relevant than they are today.

about two weeks ago
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Brendan Eich Steps Down As Mozilla CEO

Dutch Gun Re:I think this is bullshit (1746 comments)

Obamacare allows everyone in the country to share ownership of the means of production? Sweet. I'm going to tour some of the factories that I'm now part owner of.

Shared ownership of land/factories/etc is fairy-land communism that college professors dream of. Here in the real world, communism just means means that the state controls your life.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Penny Arcade Honored by Washington State

Dutch Gun Dutch Gun writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Dutch Gun (899105) writes "Jerry Holkins and Mike Krahulik (Tycho and Gabe) of Penny Arcade have been honored by the Washington State legislature with a resolution. The bill praises their charity work with Child's Play, for attracting tourist dollars by starting the Penny Arcade Expo, which has grown to become the largest video game exhibition in the country, providing student scholarships, and for their leadership role within the computer gaming community. Washington State is home to at least 45 game development companies, including such notable names as Nintendo of America, Microsoft, Bungie, Valve, ArenaNet, PopCap, Gas Powered Games, Monolith, Zipper Interactive, Snowblind Studios, and more.

This is a marked departure from the typical news involving governments and gaming. One could see the courtship of the computer gaming industry by the State of Washington as a shrewd political move, given the current tough economic times and the seeming resistance of the entertainment industry to recessions. Or, perhaps a bit less cynically, this might just be a sign that gaming has reached a critical threshold of mainstream normalcy."
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Microsoft Lays Off Entire Flight Sim Team

Dutch Gun Dutch Gun writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Dutch Gun (899105) writes "Microsoft has just laid off the entire Flight Simulator development team. This continues a long-running trend of terminating or severing relationships with game development studios, such as the Bungie split, FASA, or the closure of Ensemble Studios.

While one would presume that core Xbox development is not currently in jeopardy after spending up to a billion dollars to pay for Xbox 360 repairs and salvage its reputation with gamers, does this signal a reversal from Microsoft's recent focus on internal game development? And what are it's plans for Flight Simulator, a twenty-five-year product with an extremely loyal user-base and a multitude of externally developed add-ons?"
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Microsoft Lays Off Entire Flight Sim Team

Dutch Gun Dutch Gun writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Dutch Gun (899105) writes "Microsoft has just laid off the entire Flight Simulator development team. This continues a long-running trend of terminating or severing relationships with game development studios, such as the Bungie split, FASA, or the closure of Ensemble Studios.

While one would presume that core Xbox development is not currently in jeopardy after spending up to a billion dollars to pay for Xbox 360 repairs and salvage its reputation with gamers, does this signal a reversal from Microsoft's recent focus on internal game development? And what are it's plans for Flight Simulator, a ten-year product with an extremely loyal user-base and a multitude of externally developed add-ons?"
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NCSoft and Epic sign exclusive PS3 deals

Dutch Gun Dutch Gun writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Dutch Gun (899105) writes "Epic has announced that Unreal Tournament 3 will be a 2007 Playstation 3 exclusive. Perhaps even more significant, though, is the fact that the widely-used engine will be ported to and optimized for the console, providing an efficient development system for other games.

Sony has also partnered with Korean-based MMO (Massively Multiplayer Online) developer/publisher NCSoft to develop exclusively for the Playstation 3. This could be seen as a move by Sony to ramp up it's console's online presence to compete with Microsoft's popular Xbox Live service. NCSoft's more well-known games include Guild Wars, City of Heroes, Lineage I & II, and Tabula Rasa (currently in beta). No specific titles were announced, but it seems plausible we'll be hearing about one or more of these MMOs being developed for the Playstation 3 in the foreseeable future.

http://www.gamasutra.com/php-bin/news_index.php?st ory=14650"

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