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Western US States Using Up Ground Water At an Alarming Rate

Dutch Gun Re:ALL RIGHT! (212 comments)

Our smug-as-hipsters-in-a-coffeeshop Seattlite neighbors aside (yeah, I live in one of those suburbs), we actually have really good, reasonably priced water here, unless you're of the opinion that fluoride is poisoning your kids, I suppose.

Our water is very soft and some of the best tasting water around. Whenever our family drove our RV down to California (this was obviously years ago when gas wasn't priced like now - it was cheaper than flying + renting hotels), one of our most precious resources was our on-board supply of Washington water. We couldn't stand the hard stuff you'd get down there, especially in the LA area.

One day, as we drove the RV over a driveway curb, the water cap got knocked off. We panicked, trying to put the cap back on to save our precious water as though it were liquid gold. Our hosts, who's driveway we were watering, couldn't understand our consternation. Don't worry, they said, you can just refill your tank with our water. But, we protested, this is Washington water! They looked at us like we were nuts.

about half an hour ago
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Microsoft's CEO Says He Wants to Unify Windows

Dutch Gun Re:Yay.. This is easy to imagine (310 comments)

Or perhaps he wanted to open the PDF in a window. One would think that should be fairly easy. You know... in Microsoft Windows.

yesterday
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Privacy Lawsuit Against Google Rests On Battery Drain Claims

Dutch Gun Re:Similar argument for desktops (163 comments)

Windows users: set a system-wide proxy and watch the traffic to Microsoft on a regular basis. Windows update, CRL, other mysterious links, and of course their associated DNS queries. How much bandwidth does that suck up?

Window Update? How dare Microsoft regularly and automatically patch known security flaws in their OS and other software.

*shakes fist in Redmond's general direction*

2 days ago
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Oso Disaster Had Its Roots In Earlier Landslides

Dutch Gun Re:eh? (63 comments)

To summarize the summary: "The most striking finding is that...it was not extraordinary."

Not to belittle the loss of those involved but it's always a bit much that 43 dead in the US = catastrophe. If this had happened in Asia or Africa it wouldn't make the news unless hundreds or thousands had been killed.

Who cares what it's called? No one I know of is trying to compare this to the horrific losses in Japan after the tsunami, or other major disasters around the world. It was a big deal to us here in WA state (and I heard the terms "disaster" and "tragedy" used more often anyhow). An entire square mile of mud 10 to 40 feet thick wiped entire families and/or all their property from the face of the earth in an instance. Whatever you want to call it, it was pretty awful for everyone involved - including the rescuers.

If my next-door neighbor gets robbed or had their house burned down, that would be a big deal to our local little neighborhood. Someone in the next town over might sympathize, if they heard about it at all. It wouldn't get reported on the other side of the country. That's just the reality of life, and it's nothing to wring our hands over.

2 days ago
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The Daily Harassment of Women In the Game Industry

Dutch Gun Re:Let's draw a distinction here... (905 comments)

I'll agree with your premise that assholes are assholes, though, and yes, I've met my share of them (there are plenty of middle-class and rich assholes too, in case you missed it). But I think a much smaller percentage of assholes have the courage to say nasty things right to someone's face, on the record, and with the possibility of immediate retaliation. If the only think that keeps their piehole shut is the possible consequences, legal or otherwise, that's fine by me.

Oh, and for what it's worth, anti-sexism laws haven't changed how "middle-class people view women". The laws are just a reflection of changing mores in society. I'd say you've got cause and effect reversed. The majority of people collectively decided it was no longer acceptable to sexually harass co-workers/underlings and later dismiss it with a wink and nod. Seriously, read some of the shit these women have had to put up with. There's no goddamn excuse for that - none at all. And I'm not going to excuse it no matter what someone's social or economic position is. And fuck anyone else who tries to excuse it for any reason, because they're part of the problem as well.

2 days ago
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The Daily Harassment of Women In the Game Industry

Dutch Gun Let's draw a distinction here... (905 comments)

I'll admit I was a little relieved after actually reading the article. I assumed it was talking about harassment of male game developers towards female coworkers, which would have really surprised me. I've worked in the industry for over fifteen years, and I've never even heard of any sort of sexism toward the women that were employed alongside me. It simply wouldn't have been tolerated at the places I've worked, so far as I know, and that's a good thing. While the programming department was, of course, largely male, the other departments (art, design, writing, production) were more evenly split. Everyone I've known has valued talent and hard work, and gender was pretty much an afterthought, at least so far as I could tell. Then again, I'm a guy, so I'm probably not quite as attuned to that sort of thing.

In fact, the article seems to be mostly about women (largely in the gaming press) interacting with the still-all-too-ugly disposition of the anonymous hoards of gaming fans that interact with them. That made a bit more sense to me, unfortunately, as such women are by nature already public figures, and will probably attract a lot more bile. Let's face it. People on the internet, including (especially?) gamers, are not only sexist, they're racist, homophobic, and unbelievably cruel at time. I care a lot about the gaming culture and community, and it pains me to admit this. There's a shocking disconnect between what would be acceptable in real life versus what's said online. I'd imagine very few of those idiots would ever have the courage to say those things to someone's face.

The only way to deal with this is absolute zero tolerance policies, at least on forums (literal or otherwise) that you have any control over. There's simply no excuse for this sort of behavior. The internet could really stand to collectively grow up a little, and realize that being anonymous shouldn't give you a free license to be an asshat. Frankly, I don't think that "normal" people turn into foul-mouth talking assholes when online and anonymous. My feeling is that they were assholes to begin with, but just didn't have the courage to say those things to anyone's face. These folks are not going to go away, I'm sorry to say. It would be nice if human nature could evolve a bit. But that doesn't mean anyone has to put up with this sort of shit any more than necessary. I'm also sorry to say that as a man, I'm pretty sure I'll never understand how a woman feels when she goes through something like this, and it makes me angry that so many would have to.

2 days ago
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States That Raised Minimum Wage See No Slow-Down In Job Growth

Dutch Gun Re:Local testing works? (774 comments)

Did you even read to the end of the first paragraph? I'll quote myself again:

 

Counterpoint: Even water is poisonous if too much of it is drunk, so we have to be careful of not reading too much into this thought experiment. It's just to clarify the effects in our minds.

I'm acknowledging that even a good thing can be bad in doses too large. The point of the thought experiment is to clarify exactly what the side effects would be. Would those side effects take place in smaller scales with a smaller increase? If that's the case, then is doing this a wise idea, knowing we'll introduce those negative effects?

In fact, I'm not entirely convinced it would NOT be worthwhile to take our chances (although I remain skeptical). Again, I'll quote myself.

My feeling is that it's not a simple binary issue, more of a scale, where a smaller increase can be beneficial, but larger increases could be significantly detrimental (mostly through inflationary pressure, not necessary unemployment).

In other words, I'm not necessarily opposed to modest increases. I'm just saying we have to be very careful not to rush forward increases too large before we really understand the full ramifications of doing this.

Sheesh. This is what happens when issues get too damned political. People just stop listening once they figure out what side they think you're on.

3 days ago
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States That Raised Minimum Wage See No Slow-Down In Job Growth

Dutch Gun Re:Local testing works? (774 comments)

Speaking as a conservative, I just don't think that trying to artificially adjusting market forces will have a net benefit on the lower working class. It has nothing to do with siding with businesses or hating poor people for whatever reason. I want people to succeed, and the best way to do that is to provide people with the best opportunity to do that for themselves. But it seems unlikely to me that you can pass a law and magically increase a bunch of people's living standards without negatively impacting others in an unanticipated way. Economic reality isn't quite that simple or forgiving, unfortunately, and we live in reality, not a fairyland of good intentions. People on the lower ends of the economic ladder are the first to suffer if the experiment goes awry, which is what I'm afraid of.

Honestly, I'd love to be proven wrong on this, because it's a hard position to take, and it would be great if we could actually help people this way. But the articles in the summary don't give any clear evidence one way or another, as they admit causality can't really be demonstrated. I think it's worthwhile to proceed with cautious increases and carefully watch the results, and do our best to extrapolate results to decide future policies. Unfortunately, I fear this issue has already become too political to avoid coloring opinion and studies, but I guess we'll see.

3 days ago
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States That Raised Minimum Wage See No Slow-Down In Job Growth

Dutch Gun Re:Local testing works? (774 comments)

Conservatives truly do not, on a very fundamental level, understand how hard it is to move up rungs on the income ladder when you're at the bottom.

To do the conservative fantasy, and take smart risks which hard work turns into prosperity you need something to risk. Which you don't have unless you're in a City with a) a very high minimum wage or b) excellent mass transit. In the US b) means Chicago or New York.

I've heard very few claim that it's *easy* to move up in life economically, but many argue it's *possible* in the vast majority of cases. Moreover, there's an important distinction to make between equality of opportunity and equality of results. Most conservatives I've talked to seem to understand this fact very well, because a lot of them have lived through it, or have seen their parents or grandparents do it.

4 days ago
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States That Raised Minimum Wage See No Slow-Down In Job Growth

Dutch Gun Re:Local testing works? (774 comments)

I'd suggest a thought experiment: if a small increase in minimum wage is good, why not a large one? What would happen if you made it $25 an hour? What about $100? Counterpoint: Even water is poisonous if too much of it is drunk, so we have to be careful of not reading too much into this thought experiment. It's just to clarify the effects in our minds.

If the cost of hiring employees goes up, the operational costs of a business also goes up. That's simply indisputable (at least, I'd hope no one here would dispute simple math). For many businesses, labor is a very significant portion of their budget. There are only a few realistic options for businesses that I can think of. I've ordered them what I would guess to be the order of probability:

1) Decrease benefits or cut worker hours (especially overtime).
2) Hire fewer workers or reduce staff to compensate.
3) Increase prices, passing the cost along to the consumers.
4) Accept lower profit margins.

It's not because the companies are evil, but neither are they good or altruistic. They're in business to make a profit - that's the entire point of business, and more to the point, *can't survive* if they don't. Many small businesses have razor-thin profit margins as is. So, #4 automatically comes last. #3 is second to last because most businesses are in competition with others, and can't arbitrarily raise prices without hurting their business overall. So, that option has to be used very cautiously, and then only if the same trend occurs among competitors.

Personally, I think it's simply a matter of deciding if we want to accept the consequences of a minimum wage, and whether that overrides the positive net effects. My feeling is that it's not a simple binary issue, more of a scale, where a smaller increase can be beneficial, but larger increases could be significantly detrimental (mostly through inflationary pressure, not necessary unemployment).

To me, this is similar to the taxation issue, which you mentioned. At some point, the drain on the economy outstrips the benefits of high tax rates, so the trick is to find the rate that combines economic benefit with government funding, combined with the moral question of how much money the government should be collecting from its citizens overall.

4 days ago
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Dealing With 'Advertising Pollution'

Dutch Gun Re:Reason I installed addblock. (391 comments)

Unplug the network cable, poof, advertising gone.

I didn't realize how bad it was until I had accidentally left the cable unplugged as I'd used that port for another non-Wifi equipped PC. When I started the Xbox 360 again I was blown away by how much more pleasant it was.

Unfortunately, my Xbox is used for streaming my ripped DVD/Blu-ray collection from my media server, so that's not an option. As joemck indicated, a better solution for me is to perform some filtering, but honestly, my annoyance level isn't quite high enough to bother with that yet. Besides, as I mentioned, a large part of my beef is the lost screen real estate, and blocking the ads really doesn't address that.

4 days ago
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US Senator Blasts Microsoft's H-1B Push As It Lays 18,000 Off Workers

Dutch Gun Re:Did he just notice that? (528 comments)

I'd argue that an employer's duty is both to compensate you monetarily AND to provide a safe and comfortable working environment. Beyond that one nitpick, I completely agree with you.

Even as a temporary contract programmer, when my project with Microsoft was cancelled, I was treated very well. They kept me on for another month as an unofficial "severance" even though there was no work to be done, and arranged for a few other internal interviews for me. My project lead also bought me an Xbox (the first one, which had recently come out) and some games out of his own pocket.

Obviously, that was a while ago, but from what I've heard, MS still generally treats its people pretty well, and that experience was borne out several times while working for them in contract positions. Note that this isn't completely altruistic - part of it is to avoid wrongful termination lawsuits (I've been given severance pay by another employer in exchange for promising not to sue, which was fine with me), and part of it is simple competition with others who might treat their employees better. And of course, part of it is that most people aren't complete jerkwads, and understand that helping out someone with a severance package is simply the right thing to do, as being laid off is already a mildly traumatic experience.

5 days ago
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Dealing With 'Advertising Pollution'

Dutch Gun Re:Reason I installed addblock. (391 comments)

Too bad adblock doesn't work on my Xbox 360. Microsoft has really gone over the edge with cramming advertising down its customers throats. At this point, quite literally, MOST of the screen now is taken up by advertisements of one form or another on the main navigation pages. What's really irksome is that this was a post-purchase change that we were required to get if we wanted to continue to play with friends online, not to mention I'm already paying them $60 a year for the privilege of watching their advertisements.

I honestly don't mind the adverts about the new games or other available content coming out, as that's obviously relevant and appropriate for the platform, but I really wish they wouldn't advertising general products or take up so damn much of the screen real-estate, which is already rather precious on a TV screen. It's not one of those "frothing-at-the-mouth-angry" dealbreakers, but rather one of those "slow-burn grumbling" issues that are irritating enough for me to complain about on Slashdot, but not quite enough to cancel my service and ditch my Xbox. Although, when I finally purchase a next-gen console, I'm much more likely to look favorably at a PS4. Essentially, the Xbox one already has another negative tick against it because of the ads.

Basically, you see there a great example of what many companies would *like* to do to the web. It's up to consumers to demand that they be kept to reasonable levels of intrusiveness.

5 days ago
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Math, Programming, and Language Learning

Dutch Gun Re:Your Results Will Vary (241 comments)

You've got a very good point. If you don't have a mathematical background in a particular field, you might not even know that there was a potential solution to a problem you were working on.

In a more general case, I consider this to be a something of a minor problem in the videogaming industry. In general, I haven't seen a lot of cross-pollination between videogame programmers and other industry professionals. This is partially because this job has some fairly specialized skillset requirements, and partly because the pay is lower and the hours worse for the privilege of working on a videogame rather than business software. I've noticed the general trends and techniques tend to be a bit behind the times. A conservative approach is not necessarily a bad thing, because programming a high-definition real-time virtual simulation on commodity hardware is an incredibly demanding task and sometimes requires performance-oriented priorities. Still, sometimes it can make things more difficult than they need to be when more modern techniques and methodologies can be appropriately applied.

BTW, it's a shame that some people won't see your comment simply because you're posting as an AC. No account, or did you use mod point in this thread already?

5 days ago
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Google To Stop Describing Games With In-App Purchases As 'Free'

Dutch Gun Re:What about demoware/trialware? (139 comments)

For crippled or time limited apps, we have a term that applies for that: demo. That moniker should be required, because simply calling it a free app is completely disingenuous.

If the free app is only ad-supported, I think it should still qualify as "free". After all, broadcast TV, radio, and the internet is largely ad-supported, and we talk about that being "free" as well. However, I think apps should be required to indicate whether they are ad supported or not, or whether they offer purchase of a "premium" version.

Maybe Free/Ad-supported instead of just Free? That would really let people distinguish between the truly free apps and the ones that are trying to earn advertising revenue.

about a week ago
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Math, Programming, and Language Learning

Dutch Gun Re:Your Results Will Vary (241 comments)

I took nothing past Calculus either and up until two or three years ago never even used trigonometry in my professional programming. The last few years I've been writing satellite simulations, which has forced me to knock the rust off some of my old math skills. Most programmers can get away with very little math a lot of the time. A lot of very interesting programming involves a fair bit of math. That programming is generally being done by some guy with a Ph.D. in another field, and he's usually doing it in Fortran.

You're touching on what I consider to be the ultimate fallacy of this question. If someone asks the question "how much math does a programmer need to know?", I'd answer with "a programmer of what?"

My profession happens to be videogame programming. In my own experience, higher-level calculus is largely unused, but geometry, linear algebra, and matrix math are the bedrock of 2D and 3D simulations. Even then, the level of competence required depends largely on your specialty. A graphics programmer requires more mathematical savvy than an AI or general gameplay programmer, for example.

Programming, unless you're a theoretical computer scientist, is typically about solving practical, real world problems rather than problems specific to the domain of computer science. The problem domain the programmer is trying to solve is what determines the mathematical requirements, not the programming itself. In fact, you can go a bit farther than this and simply call mathematics part of the general "domain knowledge" which may or may not be required for a particular programming task. It's no different than when knowledge of accounting and bookkeeping is required when programming financial software, or a knowledge of music theory when writing music composition software.

So, the question only becomes meaningful when you attach it to a specific programming job or industry.

about a week ago
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Selectively Reusing Bad Passwords Is Not a Bad Idea, Researchers Say

Dutch Gun Re:Dumb dumb dumb advice... (278 comments)

Yeah, because single point of failure is exactly how you want to perform security.

Just make that point of failure a modern, well-vetted encryption algorithm. Those algorithms are, despite serious effort by every cryptologist on the planet, still completely unbreakable. The math is solid. Properly implemented, the only chink in the armor is then the password, and that's something in my control.

So, yes, I'm fine with a single point of failure, so long as it's intelligently chosen. A mathematical model will not suddenly break or stop working like a hard drive or router, barring some revolutionary crypto breakthrough. It's sort of like worrying that an airplane's wings or fuselage are "single points of failure". Technically true, but those components are built robustly enough that it's not really worth worrying about, and the realities of trying to mitigate that would be horrendously impractical.

about a week ago
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Comcast Customer Service Rep Just Won't Take No For an Answer

Dutch Gun Re:The worst company in the world (401 comments)

Hey, now, Origin performs a vital service to the community - it keeps EA games off out Steam, so that folks don't accidentally buy one!

Heh, yeah, it's sort of inadvertently had that effect for me. I wasn't necessarily trying to boycott EA altogether, but that was the end result for PC titles at least. It probably hasn't hurt them much, though. The increased profits from their own store probably offset losses from people like me.

Honestly, though, Valve isn't necessarily the white knight in the Steam/Origin powerplay either. They already take a pretty massive cut of the game's initial purchase price. Then on top of that, Steam's DLC policy basically means that companies that rely on large amounts of DLC for additional revenue and use their own in-game DLC store won't be publishing on Steam. It's a somewhat draconian policy, except perhaps if the game in question was completely free to play, in which case it makes some sense to share the revenue. After all, what business is it of Valve's what DLC transactions are made inside a game that they sell? Were they hemorrhaging money from lost DLC sales? Pfft, hardly - they just wanted a cut of that action, and since it's their store, they make the rules.

I'd argue it demonstrates why it's probably a bad thing in the long run to have a single company completely dominate any field, like... oh, Comcast, perhaps?

about a week ago
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Comcast Customer Service Rep Just Won't Take No For an Answer

Dutch Gun Re:The worst company in the world (401 comments)

I listened to the whole thing. It was amazing, and not in a good way. Keep in mind that this was also TEN MINUTES into the conversation already when he started the conversation. Unbelievable. I'm guessing these guys are financially rewarded for re-subscribing customers who call to cancel. It should be blindingly obvious that this would be the inevitable result of that.

It reminds me of an experience I had with EA when trying to unsubscribe to the wholly unremarkable MMO "Earth and Beyond". I was bored to tears with the game and no longer wished to pay each month for the privilege of not playing, but soon discovered I actually had to call and talk with a "customer representative" (i.e. someone paid to convince me not to cancel my subscription), rather than simply allowing me to do it over the internet as when I signed up. While the experience was nowhere near as bad as this poor schlub's, it was not a comfortable or pleasant experience either, and I vowed that I would never sign up for an EA MMO or ever give them my credit card again. It will be a cold day in hell before Origin is ever installed on my system.

It's probably true that such a system can convince a certain number of customers to continue subscribing, but it's harder to factor in how such a poor customer service experience will damage a company's reputation in the long run. Fortunately for gamers, the videogame industry is still reasonably competitive compared to the cable industry, and as such, has a harder time devolving into the infuriating sorts of customer experience witnessed here.

about two weeks ago
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Critical Vulnerabilities In Web-Based Password Managers Found

Dutch Gun Re:KeePass? (114 comments)

>You're telling us not to trust a web based service, but then tell us you keep your data shared like google drive or dropbox? I see no appreciable difference in practice there. Lastpass is essentially Keepass + a specialized dropbox-type service. Your advice is especially ironic given the spotty security dropbox is known for [zdnet.com].

The problem is not in the remote storage. It's in the local client that does the work to turn your clicks and typing into a secured file that doesn't need to trust the storage medium to do anything except store.

The 'web integration' puts your password manager in a really bad place - in the browser. What could possibly go wrong? Surely no one attacks web browsers.

Yep, that's very true. At this point, though, most attacks are directed at Java, Flash, or the browser's Javascript interpreter. These vectors are still dangerous because of potentially malicious content being served by untrustworthy servers. I uninstalled Flash some time ago, and make good use of noscript to prevent untested scripts from running, as that's still a dangerous attack vector. Keep in mind that plugins are run in separate processes, which affords some natural protection and isolation. Note that the attack mentioned in this article was not possible when using the plugin, which nearly everybody actually does, according to Lastpass statistics.

I well understand how it sounds extremely risky to trust your password database to a third-party service, but I feel that Lastpass itself has been built very carefully with security as the primary concern. After all, that's their first and only business. This makes it a bit different than many other web-based services, for whom security is often a distant secondary issue, or one which was hastily implemented or improved only after a disastrous breach. Still, if there's ever a massive security breach at Lastpass, feel free to send me a big "I told you so". Security can be only really validated over the course of time and many determined attacks, and so far, Lastpass has proven itself to be secure.

Keepass is a fine product, and there's nothing wrong with keeping your password database more directly in your own control. Security is always a tradeoff between protection versus convenience, and obviously, using a third-party database escrow service leans too far in the "convenience" direction for some. There's nothing wrong with that, as you can never get bitten by leaning in the "protection" direction.

about two weeks ago

Submissions

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Penny Arcade Honored by Washington State

Dutch Gun Dutch Gun writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Dutch Gun (899105) writes "Jerry Holkins and Mike Krahulik (Tycho and Gabe) of Penny Arcade have been honored by the Washington State legislature with a resolution. The bill praises their charity work with Child's Play, for attracting tourist dollars by starting the Penny Arcade Expo, which has grown to become the largest video game exhibition in the country, providing student scholarships, and for their leadership role within the computer gaming community. Washington State is home to at least 45 game development companies, including such notable names as Nintendo of America, Microsoft, Bungie, Valve, ArenaNet, PopCap, Gas Powered Games, Monolith, Zipper Interactive, Snowblind Studios, and more.

This is a marked departure from the typical news involving governments and gaming. One could see the courtship of the computer gaming industry by the State of Washington as a shrewd political move, given the current tough economic times and the seeming resistance of the entertainment industry to recessions. Or, perhaps a bit less cynically, this might just be a sign that gaming has reached a critical threshold of mainstream normalcy."
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Microsoft Lays Off Entire Flight Sim Team

Dutch Gun Dutch Gun writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Dutch Gun (899105) writes "Microsoft has just laid off the entire Flight Simulator development team. This continues a long-running trend of terminating or severing relationships with game development studios, such as the Bungie split, FASA, or the closure of Ensemble Studios.

While one would presume that core Xbox development is not currently in jeopardy after spending up to a billion dollars to pay for Xbox 360 repairs and salvage its reputation with gamers, does this signal a reversal from Microsoft's recent focus on internal game development? And what are it's plans for Flight Simulator, a twenty-five-year product with an extremely loyal user-base and a multitude of externally developed add-ons?"
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Microsoft Lays Off Entire Flight Sim Team

Dutch Gun Dutch Gun writes  |  more than 5 years ago

Dutch Gun (899105) writes "Microsoft has just laid off the entire Flight Simulator development team. This continues a long-running trend of terminating or severing relationships with game development studios, such as the Bungie split, FASA, or the closure of Ensemble Studios.

While one would presume that core Xbox development is not currently in jeopardy after spending up to a billion dollars to pay for Xbox 360 repairs and salvage its reputation with gamers, does this signal a reversal from Microsoft's recent focus on internal game development? And what are it's plans for Flight Simulator, a ten-year product with an extremely loyal user-base and a multitude of externally developed add-ons?"
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NCSoft and Epic sign exclusive PS3 deals

Dutch Gun Dutch Gun writes  |  about 7 years ago

Dutch Gun (899105) writes "Epic has announced that Unreal Tournament 3 will be a 2007 Playstation 3 exclusive. Perhaps even more significant, though, is the fact that the widely-used engine will be ported to and optimized for the console, providing an efficient development system for other games.

Sony has also partnered with Korean-based MMO (Massively Multiplayer Online) developer/publisher NCSoft to develop exclusively for the Playstation 3. This could be seen as a move by Sony to ramp up it's console's online presence to compete with Microsoft's popular Xbox Live service. NCSoft's more well-known games include Guild Wars, City of Heroes, Lineage I & II, and Tabula Rasa (currently in beta). No specific titles were announced, but it seems plausible we'll be hearing about one or more of these MMOs being developed for the Playstation 3 in the foreseeable future.

http://www.gamasutra.com/php-bin/news_index.php?st ory=14650"

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