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Ikea Foundation Introduces Better Refugee Shelter

Dyne09 Re:Quality of Life? (163 comments)

I hate to break it to you, but everything is about cost. You may think aid organizations are being cheap, but they have real budgets to work with, ones that are often very limited. These budgets are usually coming from various governments, which themselves have relatively limited resources to work with. Just look that current internal dialog process in western Europe and the USA; all those respective governments are finding every excuse they can to shut down the already tiny amounts of money they provide in foreign assistance. Furthermore, a tent living situation may not be ideal, but it isn't crappy, no more than the IKEA shelter is "sustainable." Both are pretty limited and in many ways insulting responses to an otherwise horrible human catastrophe. To further underscore my point, if the IKEA shelter at mass production costs $1,000.00 USD a unit, and the tent costs $500.00 USD a unit, then relatively small settlements could see savings in the hundreds of thousands if not millions of dollars by using tents, money that could be spent on other services such as food, medical assistance, education, etc. If we all had unlimited resources to work with, then why wouldn't we just build a 5 star hotel and golf course too?

about a year ago
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Ikea Foundation Introduces Better Refugee Shelter

Dyne09 Re:Sounds terrible... (163 comments)

The idea of a refugee settlement utilizing relatively permanent building materials can and does occur, however it's often the case that host governments simply refuse to allow that to happen. A shelter using permanent materials quickly becomes a small town, which lends legitimacy to refugee settlements. Some host governments want mobile tent cities so they can be moved every year or so, or at the very least broken down quickly once what what ever situation is causing the resentment crisis in the first place is resolved. That said, the types of things you're describing tend to happen organically over time, especially with refugee situations that drag on for years. It only makes sense for a number of obvious reasons.

about a year ago
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Ikea Foundation Introduces Better Refugee Shelter

Dyne09 It's about cost (163 comments)

I have worked in disaster response operations as a logistics and procurement person for six years, including rapid onset refugee settlements. Though I haven't worked directly in camp management, I have worked with purchasing, transporting and setting up these types of tents before. It doesn't say in this article, but other sources point out that even at mass production, the IKEA shelter will cost about twice as much as a canvas tent. At the end of the day, if you're setting up a tent city for 20,000 displaced refugees, that's a difference between 10 and 20 million dollars. Any large aid organization or donor simply isn't going to be able to justify doubling its operation costs. I should also add that one of the selling points of the IKEA structure is that tents only last six months, while these will last years. I don't know how long the UNHCR tents were designed for, but I think it's safe to say that in virtually every settlement I have been to, those tents tend to last longer than six months...alot longer. Usually, the tents are up for multiple years at a time, sometimes reused. This is not a justification for their crappy construction or poor amenities, but I have seen canvas tents that have been one place for six years, so the argument that the IKEA shelters is more economical in the long run isn't grounded in reality. Link to outside info: http://www.npr.org/blogs/parallels/2013/06/27/196356373/new-kind-of-ikea-hack-flat-packs-head-to-refugee-camps?ft=1&f=1004

about a year ago
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Has 3D Film-Making Had Its Day?

Dyne09 Re:Probably the future...I guess (436 comments)

Nonsense. 3D could totally enhance the storytelling process. It just doesn't do it right now, a point that I think most of us can agree. With sufficient technological innovation (and I mean pretty far beyond what we have now), I am sure it could completely make productions that much more enjoyable. I just think that we're no where near the true starting point, and I am happy to enjoy my quality movie in 2D for time being.

about a year and a half ago
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Has 3D Film-Making Had Its Day?

Dyne09 Re:No. (436 comments)

Even if there were real 3D, how would you make use of this properly? Current story telling only works because you can limit and control what people see. How will a horror movie work if half the audience can already see the guy hiding behind the rock before he leaps out? (This is just one example of a ton of problems that would arise)

I'm not sure that most people who want 3D know what they are actually asking for - personally I think 2D is perfect just leave it alone.

You can still have true 3D and mise en scene at the same time. True 3D film would still require a director's eye to progress the story, focus the attention of the audience, and deliver some degree us suspense and drama. One could have true 3D, and not at the same time have it basically be a Holodeck program where the viewer sees everything.

about a year and a half ago
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Has 3D Film-Making Had Its Day?

Dyne09 Probably the future...I guess (436 comments)

As much as I hate to say it, the 3D format for film will probably be the future. Even if this current fad dies down, the next iteration of 3D technology will probably carry it forward into the future. It's essentially the next logical step in production, the same way colorization was when it first came out. This is not to say I LIKE the 3D element in films that have been produced recently - I have seen The Hobbit and the Life of Pi in the past two weeks, neither of which where really enhanced by 3D. In fact, when I saw the Avengers in 3D, I wanted to puke from the crappy usage of post rendering. However, if you look back at early usage of colorization, it was gimmicky, and often extremely unrealistic. It took many many years for it to develop into an actual viable tool. Before everyone starts whining about how awful 3D is, there are many techniques for proper 3D rendering that modern artists haven't mastered, or have actively chosen to ignore. As an example, using deep focus to prevent blurring of items in the frame helps the human eye in 3D movies, but it contradicts pretty much most of what modern film theory tells us so far, and as such it's how we've learned to both make and perceive film. It's going to take a great deal of re-working and re-imagining to make 3D an augmentation, and not just an attraction. And this isn't counting the technological constraints of 3D, which still haven't quite made it to critical mass yet. The point is, see The Hobbit in 2D. You'll be much happier.

about a year and a half ago
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Urbanization Has Left the Amazon Burning

Dyne09 Re:So That's What Happened (93 comments)

I was a little confused about the direction of this article. Is it saying that we're actually losing more rain-forest per year due to wild fires than we were to deforestation? They draw a link between urbanization and a growth in rural wild fires, but is the net loss more than it was 20 years ago? If there is an % increase in wildfires, what does that mean in context? Maybe they explained it in the video (I couldn't watch it where I was), but all this article is saying is wildfires = bad, which I think we can all agree with.

about 2 years ago
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Felix Baumgartner Prepares for Supersonic Skydive Attempt in New Mexico

Dyne09 Re:Not Breaking the Sound Barrier (77 comments)

He will, however, be traveling faster than the speed of light when his chute doesn't open and he digs eight feet into the earth's surface like Wile E. Coyote. Light doesn't travel very fast through granite.

about 2 years ago
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Felix Baumgartner Prepares for Supersonic Skydive Attempt in New Mexico

Dyne09 Not Breaking the Sound Barrier (77 comments)

How exactly would this be moving faster than the speed of sound? Is he jumping from a non-orbiting object above the earth's atmosphere, and then hitting the stratosphere travelling 1,200 miles an hour or something? He will be going at terminal velocity for that altitude, which is (I guess) faster than the speed of sound at a lower level, but not necessarily faster than sound at where he jumps from.

about 2 years ago
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Will Your Next iPhone Be Built By Robots?

Dyne09 iJudgement Day (251 comments)

Oh shiz! Foxconn worker riots were bad enough. Can you imagine an army of factory robots rising up against their masters? Apple would usher in the robot apocalypse. Android - The iPhone Killer

about 2 years ago
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Russian Hacker Selling 1.5M Facebook Accounts

Dyne09 Re:FB has been quite liberal with users' privacy (193 comments)

"Sorry, but services like Facebook fill an important gap that nothing else really caters for. If you don't like it, think of something better, but don't go round bashing it just because you personally have never moved out of your home town or made any friends who lived more than a street away." If you're this much of a douche in person, it's no wonder your friends chose to interact with you remotely.

more than 4 years ago
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Website Mass-Bans Users Who Mention AdBlock

Dyne09 Re:Find a new site (660 comments)

Um, Hamas isn't a humanitarian organization. Before you accuse me of being right wing, I should tell you that I have worked in the humanitarian sector for years, and currently work for a Humanitarian NGO that actually does operations in Palestine. Just because an organization runs orphanages does not make them humanitarian. Former Romanian dictator Nicolae Ceauescu ran a huge number of orphanages, and I am sure he would have been happy if you wrote him checks. With the exception of intergovernmental humanitarian agencies like the UN or the International Red Cross, or of the donor departments of large governments, like USAID, humanitarian actors are private, neutral non-profit entities. Hamas is...a political group who happens to have some ideas you agree with. That does not make them any more of a "Humanitarian Group" than does giving money to Ron Paul. Also, you gave money to Hamas? Ha! Did you write checks to Idi Amin because he was obviously such a swell guy, you know, before that whole "dictator" thing?

more than 4 years ago
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Website Mass-Bans Users Who Mention AdBlock

Dyne09 Re:Find a new site (660 comments)

You....supported Hamas? I mean, you say you gave money to the Sea Shepherds, and I assume you voted for Obama by party affiliation, but exactly how did you support Hamas other than just agreeing with them? How is comparable to refusing to buy a product. While I am sure Hamas was heavily dependent upon your moral support, you ceasing to agree with them does...well....nothing. Come to think of it, how are any of these things even remotely comparable? ...oh, wait, I get it "Bad Analogy Guy"

more than 4 years ago
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Pumping Sunlight Into Homes

Dyne09 Been around since the 80s (182 comments)

This idea is not new at all... I used to work for a company that holds the original patents on this type of technology (http://www.solatube.com/), and has making these types of things since the 80s. Their product was far less obtrusive, and from the inside looked a recessed can-light, and not the transporter deck from the star ship Enterprise. Their overall luminosity was far greater too, and multiple warehouses and factory floors already use this tech. The technology around carrying light through a tubular structure has become pretty efficient, however the size of the roof perforation and the overall ability of the light to turn sharp corners are the big problem. It's basically impossible to feed these things through walls and reach a second floor. Instead, you have go straight down. There is however another company that already came up with the idea of using a solar dish to track light, only, they did it much much much more intelligently. http://www.sunlight-direct.com/ With fiber optics, they can scale down the size of the perforations, go much further distances, and make the lights much less obtrusive. They can even make 90 degree turns (or 180 degree, or 490 degrees if you really wanted too....) with virtually no loss of light. Just stating the obvious...

more than 4 years ago
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An Exercise To Model a "Solar Radiation Katrina"

Dyne09 Why not a a solar tsunami? (225 comments)

Americans are so weird. Why does any disaster have to be Katrina, especially when there is no comparison to the scope or nature of Katrina. And what was that quip about "leaving millions of people in northern latitudes without power"? Does the rest of the world not count? While the realities of a danger like this are something to take a good look at, I find the dialogue to be western centric and kind of out of touch. Oh noes! My data is not available to me!!!1 What about places where lack of electricity is all it takes to cripple a water purification system or a hospital?

more than 4 years ago
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Membrane That Turns Any Surface Into a Touchscreen

Dyne09 Multi-touch, but... (111 comments)

does it actually have a visual display? Am I missing something? This turns surfaces into multi-touch inputs, but does it actually turn into a display device as well? What is the point of placing this film "over a wood surface" if you can't see what the hell you're actually dong?

more than 4 years ago
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The Gradual Erosion of the Right To Privacy

Dyne09 Re:Apples and ornages (234 comments)

There have been cases where a peeping tom has viewed and even video taped private persons in their homes, and as long as the peeping tom is on public or their own property, they are within their legal right. Performing personal acts in front of an open window that is publicly viewable is akin to posting intimate details online, and the law has upheld this in some cases. "Reasonable Expectation" is still at the whim of who ever makes the law.

more than 4 years ago

Submissions

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Samsung Develops A Transparent OLED Laptop Screen

Dyne09 Dyne09 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Dyne09 (1305257) writes "The design blog has posted an entry on Samsung's new laptop with a transparent OLED screen. The photos show a dark tinted and dimly lit screen that is fully see-through. While the utility of a see through laptop probably isn't that high for the average user, several medical and industrial industries could greatly augment design work or frame 3-D models over real life in real-time. Imagine a world where this concept is expanded to include things like car windshields or reading glasses?"
Link to Original Source
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Apparently Magnetic North is Moving....East?

Dyne09 Dyne09 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Dyne09 (1305257) writes "National Geographic has published a story outlining research that Earth's magnetic pole is rapidly moving in an easterly direction at a speedy 40 miles per year. Yet unknown forces in the core of the Earth are creating a "magnetic plume," affecting the magnetic pole. The roaming pole's destination: Russia! Sara Palin was right! Oddly enough, my own compass tells me it just keeps moving north..."
Link to Original Source
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New robotic hand 'can feel.' But can it love?

Dyne09 Dyne09 writes  |  more than 4 years ago

Dyne09 (1305257) writes "The BBC has just run an article about a group of Swiss and Italian scientists who have created a robotic hand with forty sensors that "connect directly to the brain." Though fuzzy on the details, the hand provides sensor feedback to a willing test subject who lost his arm to disease early in life. How long until we have access to Star Wars-esque robotic limbs?"
Link to Original Source

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