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Verizon Being Sued for GPL Infringement

EMIce I have this router (195 comments)

They are handing it out these Actiontec routers with fiber optic service. It has a coaxial port which is WAN/LAN port (different frequencies for each), WAN ethernet port, and a few LAN ethernet ports. The coaxial LAN and cat5 LAN are bridged.

The TV set top boxes get IP addresses on the LAN via their coaxial connections. So these Verizon controlled boxes actually sit on my LAN in the same subnet as my PCs. They start at 192.168.1.100 while the PCs start at 192.168.1.2. Well I pinged then port scanned these Motorola set top boxes, and at least the HDTV DVR model of the box had it's VxWorks debug port left open. Interesting...

With the right tools I could imagine full access to the drive and the running software. So what does it take to work with this VxWorks debug port?

Some people may want to copy recordings out or enable the USB/Firewire to allow more than the 80GB internal storage included, but I am more curious if this untrusted box is doing anything I don't want on my home network. Few have the special equipment to tap these MOCA (multi-media over coax) wires between the router and the STBs, so this debug port might be a good way to check.

more than 6 years ago

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EMIce EMIce writes  |  more than 7 years ago

EMIce writes "The excitement over last week's Apple iPhone debut was tempered a bit for me by Steve Jobs' proclamation that Apple had "filed for over 200 patents for all the inventions in iPhone and we intend to protect them". But an NYU Researcher has recently demonstrated a similar interface at TED, the annual Technology, Entertainment, and Design conference. He states that multi-touch has been around since the 80's and that research in it is booming right now. There is an article at FastCompany and a video on youtube. The demo is breathtaking. So did Apple invent the impressive multi-finger zooming and scrolling that Mr. Jobs so bluntly demonstrated?"
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EMIce EMIce writes  |  more than 7 years ago

EMIce writes "The New York Times is running an article entitled Flaws Seen in Markets for Utilities. The following excerpt is telling — "Unlike the stock market, where vast numbers of strangers buy and sell, the electricity markets involve a relative handful of buyers and sellers...Critics of the current system have found ammunition in a study at Carnegie Mellon University by Sarosh N. Talukdar, who used computer models to simulate a market in which 10 utilities bought electricity and 10 producers sold it. In that experiment, the buyers and sellers learned to manipulate the price within 100 rounds of bidding, capturing from 50 percent to 90 percent of the prices an unregulated monopoly would have charged. Instead of falling, prices soared." There are striking parallels here to the broadband market — one could certainly argue it is even more restrictive to competition, at least electricity distributors are kept separate from the producers. Apparently though, that approach too has failed. The thought of regulating prices makes me uneasy, but what other end is in sight, when only a few are allowed to string up the cables for distribution? What happens when those few begin tiering the internet?"
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EMIce EMIce writes  |  more than 8 years ago

EMIce writes "Two Harvard Law professors have written an op-ed in the New York Times supporting closer monitoring of internet communications. They write, 'The same technological changes that help terrorists plot to deliver weapons of mass destruction, including low-cost information and communication over the Internet, also make it easier for the government to monitor and pre-empt terrorist plots. Libertarians overreact to the new technology, stoking fears of an Orwellian surveillance state. But properly designed programs can produce large gains in security in return for small losses of privacy and liberty.' How effective would this be, say, against a determined foe, and what specifically would prevent abuse? Any ideas on how to 'properly design' around that? And to just what extent would such monitoring take place?"
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EMIce EMIce writes  |  more than 8 years ago

EMIce writes "Two Harvard Law professors have written an op-ed in the New York Times supporting closer monitoring of internet communications. 'The same technological changes that help terrorists plot to deliver weapons of mass destruction, including low-cost information and communication over the Internet, also make it easier for the government to monitor and pre-empt terrorist plots. Libertarians overreact to the new technology, stoking fears of an Orwellian surveillance state. But properly designed programs can produce large gains in security in return for small losses of privacy and liberty.' How effective would this be, say against a determined foe, and what specifically could prevent abuse? Any ideas on how to "properly design" around those that? What exactly does "closer monitoring" entail?"

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