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Comments

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Next-Gen Thunderbolt: Twice as Fast, But a Different Connector

Em Adespoton Re:Can we standardize on an optical cable already? (147 comments)

A single mode fiber allows for Tbps, over significantly longer distances than any electrical high speed communication, and fits into a connector as tiny as you can make them. Add two copper wires for power and then leave it alone for at least a decade.

I think you just explained why this hasn't been done.

yesterday
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NYC's 19th-Century Horse Carriages Spawn Weird, Truck-Size Electric Car

Em Adespoton Re:Animal rights? (203 comments)

True, but there have always been free or heavily discounted horses available, for people connected to the right circles. Horses that were raised for show and turned out not to have the correct temperament, horses bought for children who left home, etc. Not all of them can be trained to pull a cab in traffic, but many can.

The economic downturn definitely flooded the market though; people tend to prefer a roof over their own heads to a paddock for their horse.

yesterday
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Eyes Over Compton: How Police Spied On a Whole City

Em Adespoton Re:Apropos of "ethical dilemmas programmers face". (188 comments)

ANYBODY flying over this area can take pictures, video etc. Is it somehow a problem because the police do it?

Actually, yes -- there are limits to the power of public figures because they also have the ability to abuse said power. If you give someone whose mandate is to enforce the law (catch people doing bad things) the ability to surveil public spaces and review every aspect of that space at any time, you're changing the social contract with law enforcement from how it is currently accepted.

Of course, in reality, this would save money/taxes, resulting in a smaller arrest/fine quota needed, so the smaller police forces could spend more time actually dealing with major issues and less time responding to bogus calls. Right?

I don't think this would help with domestic disturbance calls, which is what the police spend the majority of their time on.

2 days ago
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Administration Ordered To Divulge Legal Basis For Killing Americans With Drones

Em Adespoton Re:above the law (307 comments)

Yes; 13 and 14 make it explicit instead of implicit, to avoid any future backpedaling. Same could be done in this case, once the dust settles.

2 days ago
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404-No-More Project Seeks To Rid the Web of '404 Not Found' Pages

Em Adespoton Re:Content hosted where? (72 comments)

When you use the mset attribute, you would be saying where the content is hosted, yes? What happens when sites like the Wayback Machine cease to exist?

That's obvious -- before it ceases to exist, it should use the mset tag to the Google archive or the Coral cache! That way, when someone points at the archive.org page that no longer exists because the server's offline, they get, er, redirected instead of a 404. Yeah, that's it!

This is a client-side issue, not a server-side issue. You can fix a few 404 issues server-side by practicing good hosting, but it's really down to the client browser to go and find a reasonable facsimile should the original page go down.

Since finding that page requires some sort of a link, maybe whoever provides the link should cache the page they link to, and provide that cache as the alternative if the original 404s? If you've got it bookmarked, the cache would be in the bookmark (also doubles as offline reference); if it's Google search, they've already got the cache -- if it's some blog, they've cached the basic HTML output of the target page. Of course, this tramples all over copyright and security issues (new attack vector: craft a page that infects sites that linkcache it), so won't likely fly. Easier just to use Errorzilla and call it a day.

2 days ago
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Reinventing the Axe

Em Adespoton Re:I found a solution to this problem years ago (214 comments)

Grizzly Adams wouldn't use such a thing; he'd just carry a double-bladed axe -- the multi-purpose tool for all situations including defending against a pack of wolves or a mountain lion.

2 days ago
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Reinventing the Axe

Em Adespoton Re:For splitting wood. (214 comments)

I don't think chickens would be able to use this one too well. They don't have the wrist strength for it.

They've got the pecs for it though :D

2 days ago
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Reinventing the Axe

Em Adespoton Re:Adze (214 comments)

Never got to use an adze, but always thought that it looked like a good idea for certain surfaces. Used a sharpened pickaxe for hollowing and debarking, which is where an adze is usually used. Probably would have been easier/safer with an adze handle.

2 days ago
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Reinventing the Axe

Em Adespoton Re:Maul (214 comments)

One thing I can say about chopping wood for a living.. Sure makes programming and engineering look like a cushy job.

Well, sometimes I pine for the days of splitting wood. There's no amount of technique that'll compensate for the beating that my wrists get from using a keyboard all day.

2 days ago
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Reinventing the Axe

Em Adespoton Re:weird axe (214 comments)

That's why you wear a full-length lumberman's jacket while splitting. The heavy flannel absorbs the projectiles.

Of course, using a maul swing instead of an axe swing with a maul also helps, as there's little chance of shanking. It also doesn't wear you out in ten minutes.

2 days ago
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Reinventing the Axe

Em Adespoton Re:Wrong wood selection (214 comments)

The problem with this is that the swinging technique for an axe, a maul, and this thing would all be different. So you'd need three guys, each an expert at that tool, to split with each of the three blades on a wide selection of rounds (green, dry, knotty, wide-ringed, etc.). That should show a reasonable result.

2 days ago
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Reinventing the Axe

Em Adespoton Re:not an axe (214 comments)

Not an axe, axes are not used to split wood. That is a splitting maul, mauls and wedges are used to split wood. And that is actually probably closer to a froe than a maul.

99% of the population would take one look at that and call it an axe.

You start getting all pedantic, and it just confuses everybody. Maules, froes, wedges....its just axe-nerdery to the rest of us.

Just let us call it an axe.

This is why we cant have nice things without eternal debate.

99% of the population would take one look at my computer and call it a screen. 20 years ago, 99% of the population would look at my monitor and call it a computer. It's not about being pedantic, it's about people who actually use these things getting annoyed at conflation that loses meaning.

Sorta like a copyright violator being called a pirate or a whistleblower being called a terrorist -- or a Robinson screwdriver being called a hex wrench.

2 days ago
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Reinventing the Axe

Em Adespoton Re:not an axe (214 comments)

A maul has as much relationship to a sledge and wedge as it does to an axe. An axe is meant for chopping (cross grain) and a maul or wedge is meant for splitting with the grain. Doesn't need to be short rounds either -- although the maul and wedge combo is much better for longer rounds as you don't have to worry as much about binding or swinging technique.

2 days ago
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Reinventing the Axe

Em Adespoton Re:not an axe (214 comments)

Umm... I have to wonder, if you replace everything about a tool over time, is it still the same tool?

I think there's a famous quote in there somewhere....

http://fuckyeahterrypratchett....

2 days ago
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Reinventing the Axe

Em Adespoton Re:Neat (214 comments)

An ax(e) is a rough-wood chopping tool to go across the grain. For splitting along the grain, you generally get far better results with a splitting maul. A sledge/wedge combo is similar.

This "new" type of ax is how an inventor figured out a way to make a chopper into a slightly more efficient splitter than a standard axe. It's still not a splitting maul. Expect it to fail at both chopping and splitting when used for anything beyond the lightest work.

Actually, it could probably be used almost as well as a splitting maul, but the technique would be different (you'd use a chopping swing to do a splitting job). That said, you'd waste more energy with this than using a purposed tool like a maul or wedge. And it'd be much harder on your wrists.

2 days ago
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Reinventing the Axe

Em Adespoton Re:Neat (214 comments)

This applies even moreso to using a maul; after learning the proper technique on a splitting maul as a kid, I found I could do a couple of cords a day without it getting too heavy to swing (maul technique is different than axe technique, where you need more force and twist, less dependency on the mass of the head). Before I switched to a maul, I used to wear myself out using an axe, chopping at the wood instead of splitting it. With a maul, I could concentrate less on the force of the swing, and more on accurate placement of the head. Once you master the technique, using a heavier long-headed maul is actually much easier, as it almost always split the wood on the first drop.

2 days ago
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Reinventing the Axe

Em Adespoton Re:Neat (214 comments)

Like most tools, there's a great deal of variability and options out there.

Some log splitters are painfully slow, whereas some of the better multi-stage/variable speed types probably work at about the rate I could.

Even with a slow log splitter, I'd rather hang out with a beer and feed the thing over a few hours than spend a half hour with an axe.

Axes are for chopping -- use a maul for splitting. :)

I've always found that while a splitter takes less physical effort, the time taken is about the same, minus the time spent refueling, fixing blade alignment, getting the stuck pieces out, etc.

Plus there's the odd feeling about burning fossil fuels to prepare trees for fuel use -- with me not getting much exercise out of the situation other than a sore back from leaning over to pick up the rounds and load them.

2 days ago
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Reinventing the Axe

Em Adespoton Re:Neat (214 comments)

I was wondering about that. If you've got well-seasoned, knot-free, straight logs it splits easily enough with a plain old maul. This may have an advantage over that, but it seems like trying to improve on a situation that's already good enough.

As the GP says, if you're splitting by hand, you're already choosing to do a job by hand that really can be efficiently outsourced to a machine. (And given the high price of this axe, one that's not necessarily all that much more expensive.) The thwack of splitting can be quite cheerful; you feel like you've accomplished something.

I'd like to see it applied to some of the crap I've split in my time, where it takes a dozen carefully-placed whacks to get it to go (and sometimes, not even then). That's not fun.

I had a similar question. When I was first taught to use a maul, I was taught to choose a maul with a handle that puts the kinetic energy slightly off centre from the blade tip -- and if the handle ends up true, to adjust my swing so that at the point of contact, angular momentum is slightly to the side.

I don't see that this really adds anything other than changing the swing technique needed to use it to an even curve with a straight grip instead of a twist grip -- and it seems to me that this could be a bit jarring on your wrists as the momentum from the design overcomes the way you're holding the axe.

Wouldn't it be better just to learn how to swing a maul efficiently?

2 days ago

Submissions

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Apple now relaying all FaceTime calls due to lost patent dispute

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  about 8 months ago

Em Adespoton (792954) writes "Before the VirnetX case, nearly all FaceTime calls were done through a system of direct communication. Essentially, Apple would verify that both parties had valid FaceTime accounts and then allow their two devices to speak directly to each other over the Internet, without any intermediary or "relay" servers. However, a small number of calls—5 to 10 percent, according to an Apple engineer who testified at trial—were routed through "relay servers."

At the August 15 hearing, a VirnetX lawyer stated that Apple had logged "over half a million calls" complaining about the quality of FaceTime [since disabling direct connections]."

Link to Original Source
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Facebook to include profile photos in its facial recognition database?

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  about 8 months ago

Em Adespoton (792954) writes "Facebook has published a summary of the updates it's proposing to make to its Data Use Policy and Statement of Rights and Responsibilities which shows a large volume of rewriting.

Most of the changes are minimal, but one area has caught people's attention — photo tagging.

Facebook has highlighted how it plans to use members' profile pictures as an identification tool to allow their friends to tag them in photos.

NakedSecurity's Lee Munson has more details, including comments from Facebook's chief privacy officer Erin Egan on why this is a "good thing"."

Link to Original Source
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Ivetva ynhapurf Tynff-obggbzrq cynar

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  1 year,22 days

Em Adespoton (792954) writes "Ivetva unf erpragyl perngrq gur grpuabybtl erdhverq gb cebqhpr gur jbeyq’f svefg tynff-obggbzrq cynar. Guvf grpuabybtvpny vaabingvba pbvapvqrf jvgu gur fgneg bs Ivetva Ngynagvp Nvejnlf’ svefg rire qbzrfgvp freivpr gb Fpbgynaq. Gurl ubcr gb gevny gur tynff obggbz grpuabybtl jvgu bgure Ivetva nveyvarf va gvzr naq unir nfxrq bgure Ivetva pbzcnavrf gb fhccbeg guvf vaabingvir gevny naq ynhapu gurve arj qbzrfgvp Fpbggvfu ebhgr."
Link to Original Source
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The DDoS That Almost Broke the Internet

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  1 year,27 days

Em Adespoton writes "Had any network issues over the last week? CloudFlare, an AnyCast, Anti-DDoS network provider writes, "Our direct peers quickly filtered attack traffic at their edge. This pushed the attack upstream to their direct peers, largely Tier 1 networks. Tier 1 networks don't buy bandwidth from anyone, so the majority of the weight of the attack ended up being carried by them. While we don't have direct visibility into the traffic loads they saw, we have been told by one major Tier 1 provider that they saw more than 300Gbps of attack traffic related to this attack. That would make this attack one of the largest ever reported.""
Link to Original Source
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Study finds Lost USB keys have 66% chance of malwa

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Em Adespoton writes "Sophos studied 50 USB keys bought at a major transit authority's Lost Property auction.

        The study revealed that two-thirds were infected with malware, and quickly uncovered information about many of the former owners of the devices, their family, friends and colleagues.

        Disturbingly, none of the owners had used any sort of encryption to secure their files against unauthorised snoopers."

Link to Original Source
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Targeted attacks steal credit cards from hospitali

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Em Adespoton writes "SophosLabs, the security research division of Sophos, Inc, has been tracking an increase in targeted attacks against hospitality and educational organizations. Active malware has been discovered that steals credit card data directly from memory for later retrieval by the criminals involved. This activity appears to go back as far as 2009, just like the Stuxnet/Duqu threat."
Link to Original Source
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Can we fix SSL Certification?

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Em Adespoton writes "At DEFCON this year, Moxie Marlinspike gave an excellent presentation entitled "SSL And The Future Of Authenticity." It shows how broken the current SSL certification model is, and proposes a replacement. Naked Security adds to the issue, pointing out that with Moxie's method, does it even matter if you can trust your certificate notaries?
What do you think?"

Link to Original Source
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Palin's hacker imprisoned, against Judge's wishes

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Em Adespoton writes "It was a computer security story that made headlines around the world, involving the private emails of a woman who could have become Vice President of the United States. And now, it's ended with a young man sent to a federal prison, hundreds of miles from his family home.

David C Kernell, the hacker who broke into Sarah Palin's personal Yahoo email account, is reported to have been sent to jail despite a judge's recommendation that he should not be put behind bars."

Link to Original Source
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Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Em Adespoton writes "Following the recent expose done by CBC's investigative reporting show, '22 Minutes', the Canadian public has become aware of a bill being pushed through parliament to create a national timbit registry.

Gordon Lightfoot, representative of the Assembly of Native Canadians, was said to hold that, "even considering such a bill was ludicrous, as it would destroy the current goodwill and respect painstakingly developed over the last two centuries between the government and native Canadians."

Political Rights Activist Brian Mallroony added that he would sooner "swallow a timbit whole than register it with the government," as such a thing goes against the very basis of the values upon which our country is based.

Others across the nation have commented that they would continue to purchase and distribute timbits without registering them with the government, if such a law came into effect.

"The Canadian Native population has long depended on hunting and gathering in harsh environments in order to survive. Over the centuries, they have perfected their tools to achieve the greatest sustenance with the least amount of effort. Today, these generations of refinement have resulted in traditional Canadian Timbits, which are cheap and relatively easy to produce and yet when used skillfully, can sustain a large tribe.

"The problem is that the use of timbits in Canada has become so widespread that their use is beginning to threaten traditional Canadian food sources. In order to combat this, the Canadian government is considering instituting a Timbit Registry, so that anyone who posesses timbits must register them with the government prior to transporting, using, or selling them.

"This proposed solution is drawing fire from the Canadian native community, who view timbits not only as an integral part of their way of life, but also as a status symbol. They feel that this proposal is purely an attempt to isolate the native Canadian communities by denying them access to timbits for traditional use and social recreation."

Having arrived at a stalemate in the Timbit talks, the government is now asking the international community for their suggestions on how to peacefully nullify the impact of timbits on the environment at large, while reaffirming the native culture that celebrates the timbit as an integral part of day to day life. Please feel free to use this forum to help hammer out the details so we can present the government of Canada with a well thought out, unified statement.

"
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Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Em Adespoton writes "The Globe and Mail and others are reporting that the US Border Patrol and the DHS have announced plans for fully monitored borders between not just the US and Mexico, but also the US and Canada.

"We're looking at making it a guarded border," David Aguilar, chief of the U.S. Border Patrol, told reporters yesterday as the Department of Homeland Security announced plans for a high-tech surveillance system to stop illegal crossings across the borders with Mexico and Canada.

Secretary Chertoff added in his press briefing that "there are some limits — frankly, legal limits because of the procurement rules which come in a very fat book that prohibit my getting into too much detail. So we'll give as much detail as the law allows us to about the specifics. I will say that what we've been looking for is, in particular, proven technology. We want to get high-tech in the very best of the 21st century, but we're not interested in performing science experiments on the border. What we want to do is use tools that have been proven in other contexts to have the ability to perform and to have the durability we need in the border. And so that was a very important guiding principle and what we laid down as our requirement.""

Journals

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Keep the Government's hands off our Timbits!

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 7 years ago Following the recent expose done by CBC's investigative reporting show, '22 Minutes', the Canadian public has become aware of a bill being pushed through parliament to create a national timbit registry.

Gordon Lightfoot, representative of the Assembly of Native Canadians, was said to hold that, "even considering such a bill was ludicrous, as it would destroy the current goodwill and respect painstakingly developed over the last two centuries between the government and native Canadians."

Political Rights Activist Brian Mallroony added that he would sooner "swallow a timbit whole than register it with the government," as such a thing goes against the very basis of the values upon which our country is based.

Others across the nation have commented that they would continue to purchase and distribute timbits without registering them with the government, if such a law came into effect.

"The Canadian Native population has long depended on hunting and gathering in harsh environments in order to survive. Over the centuries, they have perfected their tools to achieve the greatest sustenance with the least amount of effort. Today, these generations of refinement have resulted in traditional Canadian Timbits, which are cheap and relatively easy to produce and yet when used skillfully, can sustain a large tribe.

"The problem is that the use of timbits in Canada has become so widespread that their use is beginning to threaten traditional Canadian food sources. In order to combat this, the Canadian government is considering instituting a Timbit Registry, so that anyone who posesses timbits must register them with the government prior to transporting, using, or selling them.

"This proposed solution is drawing fire from the Canadian native community, who view timbits not only as an integral part of their way of life, but also as a status symbol. They feel that this proposal is purely an attempt to isolate the native Canadian communities by denying them access to timbits for traditional use and social recreation."

Having arrived at a stalemate in the Timbit talks, the government is now asking the international community for their suggestions on how to peacefully nullify the impact of timbits on the environment at large, while reaffirming the native culture that celebrates the timbit as an integral part of day to day life. Please feel free to use this forum to help hammer out the details so we can present the government of Canada with a well thought out, unified statement.

top

JHL Continued... 0.0.56 Onward.

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 9 years ago Current version: JHL Available Here!.

JHL, the Java Hotline Client.
Slashdot archived my previous entry, so here's a new one. You can find the previous one here.

Send someone an e-mail with this link!

There's an official jhl website now, so these slashlogs aren't really needed anymore. If you have bugs to report, leave them as comments for the version release you find the bugs in. For feature requests, leave them in the comments of the version you're currently using. Be sure to note if it's a BUG REPORT or FEATURE REQUEST at the top of the comment.

For those who can't be bothered with the official site:

Here's some documentation for JHL as it stands now, since some things can be a bit confusing.

JHL is a Java Hotline Client first and foremost, although it also does rudimentary IRC, and looks to handle AIM chat in the future. There is very little built-in documentation, and its main audience is experienced hotline users who want a more powerful client to use, want to get rid of the spyware that is the official client, and/or want a uniform client that works on all the unixes (including Linux and MacOS X) as well as MS Windows. JHL is currently a closed-source beta, but once electron feels he has made it feature complete, and stable it will be released as open source.
Why not release it as open source now? For obvious reasons -- projects which do not start as open source which are released under a FOSS license too early tend to fizzle and die. Plus, electron wants to clean up his code before others can look at it and critique it ;)

All the following is true as of version 0.1.

First off, the AIM client hasn't been designed yet. It doesn't do anything.

Second, the IRC client is REALLY buggy -- a lot of things will lock up the entire monolithic app if you try them.

Now on to the Hotline client:

There is now a way to save settings files.

In order to create new bookmarks, you enter your connection settings in the connect dialog, and click the save button to save a new connect file.

The preferences save in the current session when you click the save button at the bottom of the preferences pane, and to make them load on startup, click the "Save to file (defaults)" button.

One other quirk is that you can't do some things by double clicking -- for example, download files -- and this is considered by some to be a good thing. However, some double click features are being added -- you can now double-click in the user list to send a message.

On to the description of the interface:

The little hand above the userlist is an ignore hand; click it while someone is selected to ignore them, click again for their chat to start showing up again.

Nicknames can be tab completed in chat; just start typing someone's nickname, hit tab, and it will autocomplete.

In the file tab, refresh refreshes the subcontents of the currently selected item; folder counts belong to the parent item, and you can not upload to a selected file; you must select the folder you wish to upload to first

There is a hotline 1.2.3-compatible folder download/upload feature. Select a folder, and it will download/upload all files in that folder.
NOTE: it will NOT download subfolders or their contents.

As an additional note to downloading, double clicking does not work. To download, you must select the file/folder(s) to download, and then either click the download button or right click and select download from the contextual menu.

For Windows users, do the following to create a shortcut that's launchable from the start menu:

select the jar file and create a shortcut

get the properties of the shortcut, and replace the Target line with

C:\WINDOWS\system32\javaw.exe -jar jhl.jar

change name and custom icon as desired.

All other hidden and unobvious features are left to the user to discover at this time; maybe I'll make another update sometime.

Finally, my requests:

Red highlighting on the chat/transfer tabs when new stuff is available. For chat, it would be new chat, for the transfers tab, it would be new items in queue and transfer finished (removed from queue).

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Odd Spam

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 9 years ago Here's an odd Spam I just got in my inbox; what do you think their scam could be?

Dear Fellow Internet Surfer;

I just want to share something that just BLEW ME AWAY when I first saw this a few weeks ago.

DON'T worry, This one doesn't cost a penny. Just a moment of your time.

Everything below is ABSOLUTELY FREE and actually has the potential to be one of the greatest Affiliate marketing opportunities EVER offered, possibly even bigger than EBay and Amazon!

100% FREE 4 LIFE INTERNET CONNECTION!!!! No contract to sign, No start-up costs and No monthly fees either!!!

How would you like to have High-Speed Internet Access for FREE? What do you think about giving away FREE BROADBAND worldwide and GETTING PAID for it again and again?!? Hundreds of MILLIONS of people worldwide will potentially be flocking to this service once they learn it really exists. And all that is needed is a simple phone-line.

And beyond that this company provides it's affiliates (free of charge) the most amazing marketing support program I have ever seen. Free to Join and Free to use.

DO NOT HESITATE on this folks , there is ABSOLUTELY NO RISK. It's going to be like the great Gold Rush of the old west! This company offers you some AMAZING income potential. You will not believe it if you just take the time to read through the site.

Facts:

-Easy to install and very simple to use

-Available anywhere in the world

-Works with your existing ISP

-A software download so there is NO need for new hardware

-FOUR times the speed of normal broadband

-Compatible with any type of phone line

-Works with any PC or MAC of the lowest specification believable

-Compatible with old 9,600kbps modems upwards to the most recent modems.

-Guaranteed to provide a minimum of 2MB internet speed and that's SUPER FAST!!

-Coming very soon worldwide OCT 1 2004, It just pre-launched a month ago!!

Again DO NOT HESITATE ,there is NO COST OR MONTHLY FEES, EVER!!

If you would like to receive more information, please write to:

dwabiz1@hotmail.com (write "SEND INFO" in the subject field)

Regards,

The Dwabiz1 Group

note: if you wish to unsubscribe to future mailings, please write: dwabiz1@hotmail.com and put "REMOVE ME" in the subject field and I will immediately delete you from my list.

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JHL Feature Requests

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 9 years ago Grab JHL here.

This journal entry got archived, so go here to continue the discussion.

Also, emulation.net has moved to a new URL until the DNS issues can be resolved. The current domain rental expires in 2009, so it probably won't be usable again for some time unless a miracle happens.

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Sad but True... Trolling works on Slashdot.

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 9 years ago Well, I just thought I'd do an experiment, and post an unsubstantiated troll in a fairly new article: http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=114223&cid=9677047

As you can see, it is still the case that people tend to give points to posts that match their own "common sense" opinion, rather than posts that actually bring something new to the discussion, like facts, references, new ways of thinking, etc.

The sad thing is, people responded to my post in an informed manner, and many have been fully ignored, even though their points are much more valid than my unsubstantiated comment.

Because of this, I guess I'll continue to read slashdot at the +1 level; the +3 and higher posts aren't worth looking at (I hope someone noticed the obvious about this sentence).

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