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Comments

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Ask Slashdot: Is Running Mission-Critical Servers Without a Firewall Common?

Em Adespoton Re: Fire(wall) and forget (238 comments)

If this were the 1990s, this would be the perfect answer. Back then, the idea was that you use a firewall as a perimeter defense in a defense-in-depth strategy.

But this isn't the 1990s, this is 2014. Nowadays, you have to assume that at least one endpoint on your local network is compromised in some way, whether that be via malware infection, clueless intern, corporate espionage, disgruntled employee, etc.

These days, any decent firewall does a lot more than prevent access to ports -- most actively monitor the traffic passing through any open port, and when configured correctly (in this case for a DB server), they'll lock anything down and flag that doesn't look like a SQL transaction, and then check for common SQL exploits, for connections to network points that should not have access to that port, for binary objects being passed in the SQL queries, and more.

What this means is that if you consider a firewall to be enabling the Windows Firewall on your MSSQL Server/Windows Server 2008 box, it's probably a good idea just because those boxes are usually not locked down correctly, and someone could be browsing facebook in IE on that box unless the firewall prevents it. But this isn't really the sort of firewall you should be applying to a transaction server that may one day have to be PCI DSS compliant.

See https://nakedsecurity.sophos.c... for one case study of how things can go horribly wrong incrementally.

3 hours ago
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Ask Slashdot: Preparing an Android Tablet For Resale?

Em Adespoton Re:Two Steps (110 comments)

Interestingly, a few years ago I had an iOS device that got dropped in water and no longer functioned. I took it apart and pulverized the electronics, as I figured there was no way I could guarantee the data on there was inaccessible.

I took the baggie of pulverized parts to the local cell phone drop for recycling; got a few odd looks as I dropped it in.

Then I took the case backing (the bit with the serial number engraved into it) to Apple for a $50 store credit. The same credit they would have given me had I given them the entire device. That's probably as good a deal as I would have got from anywhere, even if I had kept everything intact.

The best part? I kept the LCD screen, as it still worked just fine.

2 days ago
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Lots Of People Really Want Slideout-Keyboard Phones: Where Are They?

Em Adespoton Re:COST (524 comments)

This is probably the biggest reason. Asia is the new big market for phones; any design made has to support multiple Asian character formats.

However, I have another question. The submitter stated he'd pay an extra $100-200 for a slide-out, and that he doesn't mind a bit of extra bulk.

So: why isn't someone making a *phone case* with a built-in Bluetooth or USB keyboard? It'd be aftermarket, but you could slap it on any phone of a specific form factor; you could even make it a snap-in for a line of cases, so the single keypad would work across multiple lines of phones. As an added benefit, you could do multiple international phones for the areas with the highest demand; and your coverage would be larger than any specific carrier/device.

So... anyone have any examples of this? Anyone want to kickstart it?

2 days ago
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Switching From Microsoft Office To LibreOffice Saves Toulouse 1 Million Euros

Em Adespoton Re:And... (284 comments)

In my small company, we all use Linux on the desktop.

I really see no reason for using MS Office if you're a small company.

However, for large companies, collaboration tools, internationalization of documents, corporate-wide style hints, advanced spreadsheet macros, shareable diagram objects, integrated calendars, meeting room tracking, distribution policy enforcement, etc. are important, and just aren't quite there on most of the alternatives. Google Docs does a reasonable job at some of that, but not all.

4 days ago
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Researchers Successfully Cut HIV DNA Out of Human Cells

Em Adespoton Re:AIDS is good (64 comments)

Whoosh....

about a week ago
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Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Em Adespoton Re:Brought to you by the same people (102 comments)

This is a murky field. A polygraph does present useful information; it's just not necessarily whether the person is telling the truth. The major decision part of any polygraph system is the operator, and they need to have sp,e training in physical psychology to be predictably any good at using the equipment.

That's nice bullshit sandwich wrapped in pseudo-science bread you've got there.

I disagree. As I stated, polygraph machines are NOT lie detectors; the fact that they've been popularized in this way is beside the point.

Polygraphs only work in the way that swinging a five dollar wrench at someone works. It convinces them to tell you what you want to know on their own because their afraid of it. That's it.

No; that's the way that polygraphs are usually used by government and law enforcement to get the answer they want. Polygraphs actually WORK by measuring your vitals and recording the information change over time. There's a huge difference there.

And pretty soon, those health bands everyone's starting to wear will be indistinguishable from polygraphs; the only real difference being application and interpretation.

The phrase "He failed/passed a polygraph" is the biggest load of shit in "law enforcement."

I disagree here too -- it is totally eclipsed by the phrases "he was obstructing justice!" and "that DNA evidence proves it."

These days, polygraphs are much more abused by government on government employees than they are on civilians by law enforcement. But the LE abuses are the worse of the two I agree, as they're performed against people who have no choice.

about a week ago
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VP Biden Briefs US Governors On H-1B Visas, IT, and Coding

Em Adespoton Re:4 year degrees have a lot theory & fluff / (224 comments)

4 year degrees have a lot theory with big sides of fluff / filler classes.

While tech schools and community college have teachers who have been / still are working in a real work place doing IT work.

the 4 years places not so much.

Can't say for today, but my 4 year school I went through in 6 years (co-op programs spread things out); and near the end, most of my seminars were taught by either domain experts or people taking a sabbatical from their day job to teach what they had learned.

The theory courses were what has kept me employed since... there's a difference between a real CS degree (being able to do the math and work the concepts) and being a code jockey. The second has a much lower glass ceiling.

about a week ago
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VP Biden Briefs US Governors On H-1B Visas, IT, and Coding

Em Adespoton Re:H-1b should not be used for lower-level workers (224 comments)

Some places want them to fill lower-level rolls

you'd actually want a kaiser for that, I think. no?

I'd love to fill a lower-level Rolls -- as it is, I have to settle for my compact....

about a week ago
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Firefox 33 Integrates Cisco's OpenH264

Em Adespoton Re:Version number confusion (194 comments)

What makes it even more confusing is that last night, I was reading about the new features being added to Firefox 32 which is currently available to testers.

I've heard of sprints, but this is getting a bit silly.

about a week ago
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Robot With Broken Leg Learns To Walk Again In Under 2 Minutes

Em Adespoton Re:It is even faster when injured... (69 comments)

I picture breaking five legs and having it hop around on the sixth like a pogo stick.

It wouldn't even reply with "'Tis but a flesh wound...."

about a week ago
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Robot With Broken Leg Learns To Walk Again In Under 2 Minutes

Em Adespoton Re:Neural Net... (69 comments)

Yes; we have learned much from the Daleks.

Eventually these hexapods will realize that they are sometimes more efficient when flying. Watch out.

about a week ago
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Researchers Design Bot To Conduct National Security Clearance Interviews

Em Adespoton Re:Brought to you by the same people (102 comments)

This is a murky field. A polygraph does present useful information; it's just not necessarily whether the person is telling the truth. The major decision part of any polygraph system is the operator, and they need to have sp,e training in physical psychology to be predictably any good at using the equipment.

Seems to me that this new system falls into the same category. They'll be able to get some new data that would have been obscured before, but the interpretation of the data will still require an expert.

Personally, I think this is better than leaving it up to a human, as the human mind has known defects during the data acquisition phase -- these systems don't have those weaknesses, and while they can't draw any conclusions, they gather a different (and in some cases more complete) set of information than a human by themselves would gather.

The problem comes when people conflate the results of the tests with factual certainty -- both systems require interpretation, and as we all know, statistics lie 99.8% of the time.

about a week ago
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Researchers Successfully Cut HIV DNA Out of Human Cells

Em Adespoton Re:soddering (64 comments)

I facepalmed.

How do you pronounce that again?

say alms
say pal
say palm

o.O

about a week ago
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Researchers Successfully Cut HIV DNA Out of Human Cells

Em Adespoton Re:AIDS is good (64 comments)

I didn't expect the Ninjas.

about a week ago
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Researchers Successfully Cut HIV DNA Out of Human Cells

Em Adespoton Re:AIDS is good (64 comments)

We don't need it if we would quarantine the people that decided to get this virus. Other than a very few people that got it from blood transfusions in the 80's, nearly all of the people with it got it from something they intentionally did. Why can't we quarantine these morons like we used to do with other diseases? Why is GRIDS so different that we can't protect the public from these people? They've proven they'll intentionally spread it, or it would have died-out over twenty years ago. Instead, we let these people keep spreading it.

The majority of cases I know of these days are:
Needle sharing with an HIV carrier
Women who are victims of rape
Men who raped women who were previously victims of rape
Children who were born with it.

Most of the cases are in Africa.

The other issue is that testing is fully voluntary, and HIV can be dormant. Tracking the spread and infection of HIV/AIDS is inherently difficult as well, because along with discovery being voluntary, the people who have it also hear the "nearly all of the people with it got it from something they intentionally did" line. So they're not likely to admit to having intentionally done something if they can avoid it.

Compare that to SARS, where the victims could be anyone, West Nile, where prior to it going epidemic, the majority of victims were on cruise ships, or MMR, where the victims of those diseases are mostly children. Then there's Polio which is no longer eradicated, and Smallpox, which isn't much compared to the flu strains our bodies have to deal with on a regular basis these days.

Disease eradication, prevention and management is tricky. Isolating HIV carriers will prove trickier than convincing people to do annual inoculations for common viruses for which herd protection could easily wipe out the viruses in short order.

What worries me more is the HIV variant that subverts the gene therapy discussed here, creating a new immunovirus that can slice and dice our genes however it likes.

about a week ago
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Google Offers a Million Bucks For a Better Inverter

Em Adespoton Re:And here I was (260 comments)

...but at 12V, resistance is decidedly non-futile. I presume your much as possible is in a single room, or you're going to be radiating a lot of your energy before it ever reaches your 12VDC devices. Unless you're dealing with high amperages, of course. Then the runoff, while still noticeable, will at least be a small fraction of the total.

about a week ago
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Lessig's Mayday PAC Scrambling To Cross Crowd Funding Finish Line

Em Adespoton Re:I wish I could do this! (117 comments)

The difference here is that the politicians know that votes are fickle, but money is money.

I just thought of another problem with this though: for money to really speak, it has to at least have the appearance of being a continual stream. That means that once this $12mil warchest is used up, there has to be assurances that there will be ANOTHER war chest lined up to keep supporting things. Otherwise, it's easier to go with the other PAC who wants to keep things as they are, but will only donate $3mil/year.... for the next 20 years.

Lessig has to ensure this thing stays funded not just until the PAC's goals are realized, but until the goals of those being funded are realized. Otherwise, other deeper-running money may speak louder.

about three weeks ago
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Lessig's Mayday PAC Scrambling To Cross Crowd Funding Finish Line

Em Adespoton Re:If you take the bait (117 comments)

If you take the bait, and this ends up getting funded, do not be surprised when we replace one "ocracy" with another "ocracy."

That's all this guy is after - putting power in his own court by using the government to oppress people who do not agree with his point of view.

At least Lessig has a track record and is putting his name and reputation to this.

Then again, AC has a track record and , er, oh well.

about three weeks ago
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Lessig's Mayday PAC Scrambling To Cross Crowd Funding Finish Line

Em Adespoton Re:Screw you, Lawrence (117 comments)

43986
        pledges

$4,762,949
        pledged of $5,000,000 goal

11 hours left

You know, they might just do it.

But isn't this only phase 2 of 3? It'll be interesting to see how far that $12mil actually goes.

about three weeks ago
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Lessig's Mayday PAC Scrambling To Cross Crowd Funding Finish Line

Em Adespoton Re:Not a dime from me (117 comments)

I just can't support someone whose idea of freedom is allegedly protecting the rights of one group by oppressing another group.

Are you a US citizen? If so, you're likely supporting the current government structure by paying taxes. Just saying.

If you can get similar momentum behind some solution that has a chance of making any difference, and doesn't oppress anyone, go for it.

about three weeks ago

Submissions

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Apple now relaying all FaceTime calls due to lost patent dispute

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  about 10 months ago

Em Adespoton (792954) writes "Before the VirnetX case, nearly all FaceTime calls were done through a system of direct communication. Essentially, Apple would verify that both parties had valid FaceTime accounts and then allow their two devices to speak directly to each other over the Internet, without any intermediary or "relay" servers. However, a small number of calls—5 to 10 percent, according to an Apple engineer who testified at trial—were routed through "relay servers."

At the August 15 hearing, a VirnetX lawyer stated that Apple had logged "over half a million calls" complaining about the quality of FaceTime [since disabling direct connections]."

Link to Original Source
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Facebook to include profile photos in its facial recognition database?

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  about a year ago

Em Adespoton (792954) writes "Facebook has published a summary of the updates it's proposing to make to its Data Use Policy and Statement of Rights and Responsibilities which shows a large volume of rewriting.

Most of the changes are minimal, but one area has caught people's attention — photo tagging.

Facebook has highlighted how it plans to use members' profile pictures as an identification tool to allow their friends to tag them in photos.

NakedSecurity's Lee Munson has more details, including comments from Facebook's chief privacy officer Erin Egan on why this is a "good thing"."

Link to Original Source
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Ivetva ynhapurf Tynff-obggbzrq cynar

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  about a year ago

Em Adespoton (792954) writes "Ivetva unf erpragyl perngrq gur grpuabybtl erdhverq gb cebqhpr gur jbeyq’f svefg tynff-obggbzrq cynar. Guvf grpuabybtvpny vaabingvba pbvapvqrf jvgu gur fgneg bs Ivetva Ngynagvp Nvejnlf’ svefg rire qbzrfgvp freivpr gb Fpbgynaq. Gurl ubcr gb gevny gur tynff obggbz grpuabybtl jvgu bgure Ivetva nveyvarf va gvzr naq unir nfxrq bgure Ivetva pbzcnavrf gb fhccbeg guvf vaabingvir gevny naq ynhapu gurve arj qbzrfgvp Fpbggvfu ebhgr."
Link to Original Source
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The DDoS That Almost Broke the Internet

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  about a year ago

Em Adespoton writes "Had any network issues over the last week? CloudFlare, an AnyCast, Anti-DDoS network provider writes, "Our direct peers quickly filtered attack traffic at their edge. This pushed the attack upstream to their direct peers, largely Tier 1 networks. Tier 1 networks don't buy bandwidth from anyone, so the majority of the weight of the attack ended up being carried by them. While we don't have direct visibility into the traffic loads they saw, we have been told by one major Tier 1 provider that they saw more than 300Gbps of attack traffic related to this attack. That would make this attack one of the largest ever reported.""
Link to Original Source
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Study finds Lost USB keys have 66% chance of malwa

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Em Adespoton writes "Sophos studied 50 USB keys bought at a major transit authority's Lost Property auction.

        The study revealed that two-thirds were infected with malware, and quickly uncovered information about many of the former owners of the devices, their family, friends and colleagues.

        Disturbingly, none of the owners had used any sort of encryption to secure their files against unauthorised snoopers."

Link to Original Source
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Targeted attacks steal credit cards from hospitali

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Em Adespoton writes "SophosLabs, the security research division of Sophos, Inc, has been tracking an increase in targeted attacks against hospitality and educational organizations. Active malware has been discovered that steals credit card data directly from memory for later retrieval by the criminals involved. This activity appears to go back as far as 2009, just like the Stuxnet/Duqu threat."
Link to Original Source
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Can we fix SSL Certification?

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 2 years ago

Em Adespoton writes "At DEFCON this year, Moxie Marlinspike gave an excellent presentation entitled "SSL And The Future Of Authenticity." It shows how broken the current SSL certification model is, and proposes a replacement. Naked Security adds to the issue, pointing out that with Moxie's method, does it even matter if you can trust your certificate notaries?
What do you think?"

Link to Original Source
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Palin's hacker imprisoned, against Judge's wishes

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 3 years ago

Em Adespoton writes "It was a computer security story that made headlines around the world, involving the private emails of a woman who could have become Vice President of the United States. And now, it's ended with a young man sent to a federal prison, hundreds of miles from his family home.

David C Kernell, the hacker who broke into Sarah Palin's personal Yahoo email account, is reported to have been sent to jail despite a judge's recommendation that he should not be put behind bars."

Link to Original Source
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Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 6 years ago

Em Adespoton writes "Following the recent expose done by CBC's investigative reporting show, '22 Minutes', the Canadian public has become aware of a bill being pushed through parliament to create a national timbit registry.

Gordon Lightfoot, representative of the Assembly of Native Canadians, was said to hold that, "even considering such a bill was ludicrous, as it would destroy the current goodwill and respect painstakingly developed over the last two centuries between the government and native Canadians."

Political Rights Activist Brian Mallroony added that he would sooner "swallow a timbit whole than register it with the government," as such a thing goes against the very basis of the values upon which our country is based.

Others across the nation have commented that they would continue to purchase and distribute timbits without registering them with the government, if such a law came into effect.

"The Canadian Native population has long depended on hunting and gathering in harsh environments in order to survive. Over the centuries, they have perfected their tools to achieve the greatest sustenance with the least amount of effort. Today, these generations of refinement have resulted in traditional Canadian Timbits, which are cheap and relatively easy to produce and yet when used skillfully, can sustain a large tribe.

"The problem is that the use of timbits in Canada has become so widespread that their use is beginning to threaten traditional Canadian food sources. In order to combat this, the Canadian government is considering instituting a Timbit Registry, so that anyone who posesses timbits must register them with the government prior to transporting, using, or selling them.

"This proposed solution is drawing fire from the Canadian native community, who view timbits not only as an integral part of their way of life, but also as a status symbol. They feel that this proposal is purely an attempt to isolate the native Canadian communities by denying them access to timbits for traditional use and social recreation."

Having arrived at a stalemate in the Timbit talks, the government is now asking the international community for their suggestions on how to peacefully nullify the impact of timbits on the environment at large, while reaffirming the native culture that celebrates the timbit as an integral part of day to day life. Please feel free to use this forum to help hammer out the details so we can present the government of Canada with a well thought out, unified statement.

"
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Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 7 years ago

Em Adespoton writes "The Globe and Mail and others are reporting that the US Border Patrol and the DHS have announced plans for fully monitored borders between not just the US and Mexico, but also the US and Canada.

"We're looking at making it a guarded border," David Aguilar, chief of the U.S. Border Patrol, told reporters yesterday as the Department of Homeland Security announced plans for a high-tech surveillance system to stop illegal crossings across the borders with Mexico and Canada.

Secretary Chertoff added in his press briefing that "there are some limits — frankly, legal limits because of the procurement rules which come in a very fat book that prohibit my getting into too much detail. So we'll give as much detail as the law allows us to about the specifics. I will say that what we've been looking for is, in particular, proven technology. We want to get high-tech in the very best of the 21st century, but we're not interested in performing science experiments on the border. What we want to do is use tools that have been proven in other contexts to have the ability to perform and to have the durability we need in the border. And so that was a very important guiding principle and what we laid down as our requirement.""

Journals

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Keep the Government's hands off our Timbits!

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 6 years ago Following the recent expose done by CBC's investigative reporting show, '22 Minutes', the Canadian public has become aware of a bill being pushed through parliament to create a national timbit registry.

Gordon Lightfoot, representative of the Assembly of Native Canadians, was said to hold that, "even considering such a bill was ludicrous, as it would destroy the current goodwill and respect painstakingly developed over the last two centuries between the government and native Canadians."

Political Rights Activist Brian Mallroony added that he would sooner "swallow a timbit whole than register it with the government," as such a thing goes against the very basis of the values upon which our country is based.

Others across the nation have commented that they would continue to purchase and distribute timbits without registering them with the government, if such a law came into effect.

"The Canadian Native population has long depended on hunting and gathering in harsh environments in order to survive. Over the centuries, they have perfected their tools to achieve the greatest sustenance with the least amount of effort. Today, these generations of refinement have resulted in traditional Canadian Timbits, which are cheap and relatively easy to produce and yet when used skillfully, can sustain a large tribe.

"The problem is that the use of timbits in Canada has become so widespread that their use is beginning to threaten traditional Canadian food sources. In order to combat this, the Canadian government is considering instituting a Timbit Registry, so that anyone who posesses timbits must register them with the government prior to transporting, using, or selling them.

"This proposed solution is drawing fire from the Canadian native community, who view timbits not only as an integral part of their way of life, but also as a status symbol. They feel that this proposal is purely an attempt to isolate the native Canadian communities by denying them access to timbits for traditional use and social recreation."

Having arrived at a stalemate in the Timbit talks, the government is now asking the international community for their suggestions on how to peacefully nullify the impact of timbits on the environment at large, while reaffirming the native culture that celebrates the timbit as an integral part of day to day life. Please feel free to use this forum to help hammer out the details so we can present the government of Canada with a well thought out, unified statement.

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JHL Continued... 0.0.56 Onward.

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 9 years ago Current version: JHL Available Here!.

JHL, the Java Hotline Client.
Slashdot archived my previous entry, so here's a new one. You can find the previous one here.

Send someone an e-mail with this link!

There's an official jhl website now, so these slashlogs aren't really needed anymore. If you have bugs to report, leave them as comments for the version release you find the bugs in. For feature requests, leave them in the comments of the version you're currently using. Be sure to note if it's a BUG REPORT or FEATURE REQUEST at the top of the comment.

For those who can't be bothered with the official site:

Here's some documentation for JHL as it stands now, since some things can be a bit confusing.

JHL is a Java Hotline Client first and foremost, although it also does rudimentary IRC, and looks to handle AIM chat in the future. There is very little built-in documentation, and its main audience is experienced hotline users who want a more powerful client to use, want to get rid of the spyware that is the official client, and/or want a uniform client that works on all the unixes (including Linux and MacOS X) as well as MS Windows. JHL is currently a closed-source beta, but once electron feels he has made it feature complete, and stable it will be released as open source.
Why not release it as open source now? For obvious reasons -- projects which do not start as open source which are released under a FOSS license too early tend to fizzle and die. Plus, electron wants to clean up his code before others can look at it and critique it ;)

All the following is true as of version 0.1.

First off, the AIM client hasn't been designed yet. It doesn't do anything.

Second, the IRC client is REALLY buggy -- a lot of things will lock up the entire monolithic app if you try them.

Now on to the Hotline client:

There is now a way to save settings files.

In order to create new bookmarks, you enter your connection settings in the connect dialog, and click the save button to save a new connect file.

The preferences save in the current session when you click the save button at the bottom of the preferences pane, and to make them load on startup, click the "Save to file (defaults)" button.

One other quirk is that you can't do some things by double clicking -- for example, download files -- and this is considered by some to be a good thing. However, some double click features are being added -- you can now double-click in the user list to send a message.

On to the description of the interface:

The little hand above the userlist is an ignore hand; click it while someone is selected to ignore them, click again for their chat to start showing up again.

Nicknames can be tab completed in chat; just start typing someone's nickname, hit tab, and it will autocomplete.

In the file tab, refresh refreshes the subcontents of the currently selected item; folder counts belong to the parent item, and you can not upload to a selected file; you must select the folder you wish to upload to first

There is a hotline 1.2.3-compatible folder download/upload feature. Select a folder, and it will download/upload all files in that folder.
NOTE: it will NOT download subfolders or their contents.

As an additional note to downloading, double clicking does not work. To download, you must select the file/folder(s) to download, and then either click the download button or right click and select download from the contextual menu.

For Windows users, do the following to create a shortcut that's launchable from the start menu:

select the jar file and create a shortcut

get the properties of the shortcut, and replace the Target line with

C:\WINDOWS\system32\javaw.exe -jar jhl.jar

change name and custom icon as desired.

All other hidden and unobvious features are left to the user to discover at this time; maybe I'll make another update sometime.

Finally, my requests:

Red highlighting on the chat/transfer tabs when new stuff is available. For chat, it would be new chat, for the transfers tab, it would be new items in queue and transfer finished (removed from queue).

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Odd Spam

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  more than 9 years ago Here's an odd Spam I just got in my inbox; what do you think their scam could be?

Dear Fellow Internet Surfer;

I just want to share something that just BLEW ME AWAY when I first saw this a few weeks ago.

DON'T worry, This one doesn't cost a penny. Just a moment of your time.

Everything below is ABSOLUTELY FREE and actually has the potential to be one of the greatest Affiliate marketing opportunities EVER offered, possibly even bigger than EBay and Amazon!

100% FREE 4 LIFE INTERNET CONNECTION!!!! No contract to sign, No start-up costs and No monthly fees either!!!

How would you like to have High-Speed Internet Access for FREE? What do you think about giving away FREE BROADBAND worldwide and GETTING PAID for it again and again?!? Hundreds of MILLIONS of people worldwide will potentially be flocking to this service once they learn it really exists. And all that is needed is a simple phone-line.

And beyond that this company provides it's affiliates (free of charge) the most amazing marketing support program I have ever seen. Free to Join and Free to use.

DO NOT HESITATE on this folks , there is ABSOLUTELY NO RISK. It's going to be like the great Gold Rush of the old west! This company offers you some AMAZING income potential. You will not believe it if you just take the time to read through the site.

Facts:

-Easy to install and very simple to use

-Available anywhere in the world

-Works with your existing ISP

-A software download so there is NO need for new hardware

-FOUR times the speed of normal broadband

-Compatible with any type of phone line

-Works with any PC or MAC of the lowest specification believable

-Compatible with old 9,600kbps modems upwards to the most recent modems.

-Guaranteed to provide a minimum of 2MB internet speed and that's SUPER FAST!!

-Coming very soon worldwide OCT 1 2004, It just pre-launched a month ago!!

Again DO NOT HESITATE ,there is NO COST OR MONTHLY FEES, EVER!!

If you would like to receive more information, please write to:

dwabiz1@hotmail.com (write "SEND INFO" in the subject field)

Regards,

The Dwabiz1 Group

note: if you wish to unsubscribe to future mailings, please write: dwabiz1@hotmail.com and put "REMOVE ME" in the subject field and I will immediately delete you from my list.

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JHL Feature Requests

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  about 10 years ago Grab JHL here.

This journal entry got archived, so go here to continue the discussion.

Also, emulation.net has moved to a new URL until the DNS issues can be resolved. The current domain rental expires in 2009, so it probably won't be usable again for some time unless a miracle happens.

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Sad but True... Trolling works on Slashdot.

Em Adespoton Em Adespoton writes  |  about 10 years ago Well, I just thought I'd do an experiment, and post an unsubstantiated troll in a fairly new article: http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=114223&cid=9677047

As you can see, it is still the case that people tend to give points to posts that match their own "common sense" opinion, rather than posts that actually bring something new to the discussion, like facts, references, new ways of thinking, etc.

The sad thing is, people responded to my post in an informed manner, and many have been fully ignored, even though their points are much more valid than my unsubstantiated comment.

Because of this, I guess I'll continue to read slashdot at the +1 level; the +3 and higher posts aren't worth looking at (I hope someone noticed the obvious about this sentence).

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