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Comments

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Google Takes a Small Step in Lodsys Patent-Troll Case

FlorianMueller Re:Apple's proporsed answer to Lodsys's complaint (83 comments)

You keep failing to acknowledge that what you claimed was wrong. It doesn't matter for this particular discussion between us what's in the Apple license agreement. You claimed that once Apple is admitted as an intervenor, it can bring up other defenses. That's why I pointed you to Apple's proposed answer to Lodsys's complaint, which is limited to only one defense (exhaustion). Don't try to confuse reasonable, unbiased readers here who follow our discussion. You said something utterly uninformed and you desperately try to muddy the water. But that's very transparent.

about 3 years ago
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Google Takes a Small Step in Lodsys Patent-Troll Case

FlorianMueller Apple's proporsed answer to Lodsys's complaint (83 comments)

You attack all sorts of other points that I'm not interested in discussing with you. The topic here was what Apple's proposed defense against Lodsys is. That one is available on Scribd as a PDF document for everyone to read, and it raises only one defense: exhaustion. Here's the Scribd link. Compare the substance of that document to your off-base claim that Apple raised exhaustion only as a reason for an intervention without limiting its defenses to that one.

about 3 years ago
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Google Takes a Small Step in Lodsys Patent-Troll Case

FlorianMueller Re:'Patent exhaustion' _is_ a complex isssue (83 comments)

Thanks for this support. The fact of the matter is that the world's leading news agencies, newspapers and websites quote me regularly on these topics -- in the U.S., in Europe, in Asia, in Australia, at times even in Latin America. I furthermore have a host of financial services companies among my clients asking me for advice as they shape their investment decisions. Those audiences are obviously more important to me, and it turns out that the quality of Slashdot due to the criteria by which people vote posts up or down is a serious issue that I can't solve -- Slashdot has a lot of work to do if it wants to stay relevant.

about 3 years ago
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Google Takes a Small Step in Lodsys Patent-Troll Case

FlorianMueller Re:'Patent exhaustion' _is_ a complex isssue (83 comments)

I never predicted as much doom for Google as Google itself did on its corporate blog post recently in connection with Android and patents.

about 3 years ago
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Google Takes a Small Step in Lodsys Patent-Troll Case

FlorianMueller Re:'Patent exhaustion' _is_ a complex isssue (83 comments)

My reading of the documents suggests you missed the point entirely here. Apple is not claiming exhaustion as a defense for infringement for their developers. They are claiming exhaustion as a reason for their intervention under Fed R. Civ. P Rule 24(a). As such they do not have use it as a defense. What is important are the terms of the licenses which, again, no one here has read. You also ignored that Apple cites Fed. R. Civ. P. Rule 24(b) as another reason for the court to grant them leave to intervene.

Your reading of the documents is completely off base. Apple's motion for an intervention comes with a proposed answer to Lodsys's complaint, which raises only one defense: exhaustion. You could have read that on my blog. The other points you make are equally off-base.

about 3 years ago
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Google Takes a Small Step in Lodsys Patent-Troll Case

FlorianMueller Re:'Patent exhaustion' _is_ a complex isssue (83 comments)

Didn't read who was posting. The name explains it.

That's a very sophisticated, analytical approach then :-)

about 3 years ago
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Google Takes a Small Step in Lodsys Patent-Troll Case

FlorianMueller 'Patent exhaustion' _is_ a complex isssue (83 comments)

If things were as easy as you (gnasher719) say, it would certainly be just a matter of contract interpretation. But it's not. You wrote your post prior to reading my explanation of why it's far from easy to argue with the existing license agreement. I linked to that explanation before.

Apple (and Google and others) got a license to Lodsys's patents not from Lodsys itself but from Intellectual Ventures, along with roughly 30,000 other Intellectual Ventures patents. It's highly unlikely that Intellectual Ventures' standard patent licensing agreement says anything about 'app developers'. Chances are 99.99% that the term 'app developers' doesn't appear in that license agreement at all.

The analysis of whether or not Apple's license constitutes 'exhaustion' of any given Lodsys patent is no less complicated than analyzing Lodsys's infringement assertions. As I explained on my blog, 'exhaustion' is a concept that requires an in-depth technical analysis of the technology that is licensed (in this case, Apple's technology) and the one that is accused of infringement (the apps) and, very importantly, how those two layers interact. This means that the court has to go through a detailed technical analysis based on so-called infringement claim charts, which typically require the construction (interpretation) of the most relevant terms used in the language of those patents.

What I just said is also supported in full by Apple's own arguments to the court for why its intervention should be admitted (Apple stresses that only Apple itself can explain how its technology works) and a letter sent to the court by Atari, Electronic Arts, Quickoffice and Square-Enix in support of Apple's proposed intervention. Those four companies also stress the importance of access to Apple's information not only regarding the license agreement but also the technology at issue.

Exhaustion defenses are very difficult to analyze. Do some research on the case law and you'll see that those mattesr are by no means less difficult to analyze than infringement assertions.

about 3 years ago
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Google Takes a Small Step in Lodsys Patent-Troll Case

FlorianMueller Small step is correct -- this is too little, still (83 comments)

I welcome the fact that Google finally does at least something (after months of not answering related questions from affected Android app developers), and Google did a very good job so far on patent reexaminations in its dispute with Oracle.

However, these reexamination requests are of very limited use on their own . They don't change the situation of developers who get letters from Lodsys or are actually sued by Lodsys and have to decide whether to pay up or fight. Even the combination of Apple's motion for a narrowly-focused intervention (Apple just raises contractual issues as opposed to defending app developers against Lodsys's infringement assertions per se; Apple's 'exhaustion' theory could work but it's far from certain to hold water) and Google's reexamination requests doesn't really strengthen little 'indie' app developers at this stage. Also, the Wired article pointed out that the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas grants stays pending reexaminations only in 20% of all cases. Most of the time, those federal lawsuits continue unabatedly, even though the patent may subsequently be invalidated.

Short of blanket coverage from Apple and Google, what those two platform companies do against Lodsys is insufficient. It would be great if they could give their developers some real guidance -- many right now don't even dare to implement in-app purchasing or links to an app store (Lodsys also brings assertions against links, not just in-app purchasing) because they don't want to take risks. Others have removed their apps from the U.S. market because of Lodsys (which goes after international developers, too, but can only sue them if those do business in the U.S.). Apple and Google fail to create a basis on which developers would be able to simply ignore Lodsys and go about their business.

about 3 years ago
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Lodsys Sues 7 iPhone Devs Over Patent Infringement Claims

FlorianMueller Re:Those files were distributed by device makers (123 comments)

Again, I don't have to prove something I never said in the first place. My original post on that copyright issue didn't claim that any phone contained that code. So why would I have to prove it? Only because someone purposely misunderstood what I had written? In terms of copyright infringement, it's very simple: an infringement is an infringement is an infringement. And the mere publication of such files on the Internet is an infringement is an infringement is an infringement.

more than 3 years ago
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Lodsys Sues 7 iPhone Devs Over Patent Infringement Claims

FlorianMueller Re:Those files were distributed by device makers (123 comments)

If you want to prove me wrong, show me that none of those phones shipped them. In my original post on the Oracle/Google copyright issue I didn't even say that it was shipped on any particular phone. That was just a strawman set up by Ed Burnette, a ZDNet blogger. Re-read my original January 21, 2011 post on this topic: everything I said in there was correct. You might also want to read this blog post, which quotes from an official court document that shows Oracle did present those decompiled Java files to the court.

more than 3 years ago
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Lodsys Sues 7 iPhone Devs Over Patent Infringement Claims

FlorianMueller Re:Those files were distributed by device makers (123 comments)

The fact that some device makers included them in their source code distributions while others left them out could indicate that some actually used those files while others didn't. Apart from that, even just distributing such files online raises copyright liability issues.

more than 3 years ago
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Lodsys Sues 7 iPhone Devs Over Patent Infringement Claims

FlorianMueller Re:Apple took some apps down instead of defending (123 comments)

Lodsys disputes that Apple's license covers its app developers. So according to Lodsys, the situations are analogous.

more than 3 years ago
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Lodsys Sues 7 iPhone Devs Over Patent Infringement Claims

FlorianMueller I was the first one to debunk the "3 claims" story (123 comments)

Actually, I was not wrong on the Oracle/Google patents issue but the first one to point out that Oracle would realistically not be forced to narrow its asserted patent claims down to only 3. By now it's clear that Oracle has made headway on that issue, and Oracle's most recent bargaining position was still 21 claims. Apart from that, your comment was off-topic. We're talking about Lodsys here, and if you ask iOS app developers about my blog, I'm sure many of them will tell you that they found the information my blog (such as my detailed Lodsys FAQ) useful.

more than 3 years ago
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Lodsys Sues 7 iPhone Devs Over Patent Infringement Claims

FlorianMueller Not only iOS apps but also Mac and Android (123 comments)

Most of the infringement accusations relate to iOS apps, but they also include one Mac app (Twitterriffic for Mac) and one Android app (Labyrinth for Android).

Unfortunately, the defense theory communicated by Apple in its letter to Lodsys -- and another theory discussed on the Internet in recent weeks (divided infringement) -- could be wrong.

more than 3 years ago
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Groklaw Declares Victory, No More Articles

FlorianMueller Re:Pamela Jones (265 comments)

Where did RMS ever confirm to have met PJ?

more than 3 years ago
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Google Reaffirms Stance Against Software Patents

FlorianMueller The statement isn't strong enough (by far) (197 comments)

There are some things to like about Google's statement, but let's be realistic: this isn't a clear statement against all software patents including their own PageRank and Google Doodle patents. They complain about "low-quality software patents". That's absolutely not the same as being against all software patents. It means that they just believe many of those patents aren't good enough. However, the answer that politicians give then is to provide more funding to the patent offices of the world, not to abolish software patents.

I've done a lot of work on patent policy (with my NoSoftwarePatents campaign in 2004/05 and otherwise) and I know that the difference between saying "some [or even 'many'] software patents are bad" and saying that "all software patents must be abolished" is like a difference between night and day. Actually, lobbying entities working for Microsoft also call for more patent quality all the time. That's definitely not a sufficient statement to be interpreted as a call for the abolition of all software patents no matter how "good" they may be relative to other software patents.

It's like saying "we are against unjust wars" as opposed to saying "we should never go to war."

I also analyzed Google's amicus curiae brief in the Bilski case and found that it advocated higher patent quality and raised issues but didn't go far enough to really demand the abolition of software patents.

more than 3 years ago

Submissions

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First Smartphone Patent To Target App Developers

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller writes "Smartphone patent suits continue to sweep over the land. After getting bad vibes from the ITC on its complaint against Apple, Nokia just filed another suit over seven more patents. In Southern California, a spatial data patent is asserted against RIM, Google and Microsoft. Oddly, the patent holder is represented by the law firm that advises the Open Source Initiative. But the latest smartphone patent suit, filed by a company named H-W Technology L.C., is particularly worrying: among the 32 defendants it names — besides Google, Microsoft and device makers (all of whom are used to getting sued ) — various companies because of their smartphone apps: Amazon.com, eBay, Hotels.com, Expedia, Priceline.com, Orbitz Worldwide, Kayak.com, and Verizon. Those are companies who can defend themselves, but what if patent holders start to go after other app developers who don't have deep pockets? Patent holders may already have begun to demand royalties from developers of commercially successful apps..."
Link to Original Source
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ITC Investigates PlayStation 3 After LG Complaint

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "The US International Trade Commission, a federal government agency with the power to block imports of patent-infringing products, has voted to institute an investigation of the PlayStation 3 and certain Sony Bravia digital TV products further to a complaint lodged by LG a month ago. LG asserted four Blu-ray patents against the PS3 and four other patents against some digital TV products. An import ban could come within 16 to 18 months of the complaint. The decision to launch an investigation was expected. This is part of the wider patent row between the two companies that just resulted in the seizure of PlayStation shipments by European customs officers. According to Reuters, a person familiar with the matter believes Sony's regional sales won't be 'badly affected by the temporary ban.' It could look for alternative points of entry for the PS3 and take advantage of Europe's fragmented patent system."
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Microsoft, Google Sue Troll Who Sued 397 Companies

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "Microsoft and Google have teamed up against a company that holds a geotagging patent and sued 397 companies last year in Texas, most of them in mid December. The list, published on Scribd and Crocodoc, includes plenty of household names. Now the two tech giants have entered the fray together and want the patent declared invalid and seek an injunction to prevent further lawsuits over it. Since the patent holder has already filed for an initial public offering, this intervention may come at just the right time to prevent the worst. Google and Microsoft say that there was prior art when the patent on an 'Internet organizer for accessing geographically and topically based information' was applied for in 1996."
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LG Wants PlayStation 3 Banned From US Market

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "On Friday LG filed a complaint against Sony with the US International Trade Commission, claiming the PlayStation 3 infringes four Blu-ray Disc patents and demanding a permanent ban of the PS3 (and possibly other products) from the US market. LG, which boasts that it owns 90,000 patents worldwide, appears to take this step in retaliation for a previous Sony complaint about various LG smartphones, which the ITC is already investigating. This is reminiscent of Motorola's infringement action against the Xbox 360 that is part of its wider dispute with Microsoft. In other words, you touch my smartphones and I bomb your game consoles."
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EU Commission Has No Concerns Over Novell Patents

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "Complaints by the Open Source Initiative and the Free Software Foundation Europe against the sale of 882 Novell patents to CPTN Holdings LLC (a consortium of Apple, EMC, Microsoft and Oracle) have apparently not impressed the EU's chief antitrust enforcer. Asked by a Member of the European Parliament about this deal, European Commission vice president Almunia confirmed that he was aware of the proposed transaction and stated that 'the Commission has currently no indication that the mere acquisition of the patents in question by CPTN Holdings would lead to an infringement of EU competition rules.' In Mr. Almunia's opinion, such a sale of patents is 'unlikely' to even require a regulatory review."
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Novell Patent Plan Withdrawn But Not Cancelled

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "The IDG News Service reported that Microsoft, Apple, EMC and Oracle withdrew their notification of the formation of the CPTN Holdings patent consortium to the German competition authority. Some prematurely celebrated this as an achievement of the Open Source Initiative, which recently complained about the deal. But OSI board member Simon Phipps clarified on Twitter that "no evidence [he's] seen so far suggests it is in fact the collapse of the deal." He expects a refiling. Tech journalist Maureen O'Gara contacted Microsoft and was told that the withdrawal "is a purely procedural step necessary to provide time to allow for review of the proposed transaction." Regulatory filings are sometimes withdrawn and refiled at a time that is more convenient to regulators. For example, Oracle withdrew its Russian notification of the acquisition of Sun, only to resubmit it later."
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Interval Refiles Patent Suit Against the World

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "A couple of weeks after Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen's Interval Licensing saw its patent infringement suit against major tech companies thrown out, it has refiled an amended complaint. The court found that the original complaint wasn't sufficiently specific about the accused products and services. Now those are named. The amended complaint accuses, among other things, Android and all devices based on Google's mobile operating system, of infringement of a user interface patent. Interval says it's an example of an infringement that "when a user receives a new Google Voice message, the Android Operating System and Google Voice software display a notification in the status bar screen for a short period of time." Allegations against Apple are less fundamental: they relate to content recommendations provided to users by iTunes, the App Store, and Apple TV."
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Apple vs. Nokia: The legal battlelines

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "CNN.com/Fortune reflects on how the patent dispute between Apple and Nokia has escalated over the last 14 months: "In Oct. 2009, when Nokia (NOK) first complained in a U.S. federal court that Apple (AAPL) had infringed on 10 of its telecommunications patents, the case could be summarized in a fairly simple chart [...] Fourteen months later, that relatively straightforward patent dispute has escalated through suits and countersuits into a legal battle of Dickensian complexity now being fought in seven different venues, from Delaware to Dusseldorf." The article then refers to "what is likely to be the definitive map of Nokia vs. Apple. The finished document covers 19 'moves,' 11 reference pages, 31 PDF slides and more than 75 individual patents. A preview is also avialable on Twitpic."
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Microsoft and Motorola add 9 patents-in-suit

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "Patent suits are the IT industry's new Christmas cards: Microsoft and Motorola just added new accusations to their row. Motorola filed another suit in the Western District of Wisconsin, for the first time also attacking the Kinect. Microsoft threw in seven patents in Southern Florida. Two of them cover touchscreen technologies and two allegedly read on Motorola's DVRs. At this stage of the game, 35 patents are in suit between the companies. Afraid to lose track of so much peace and harmony? There's a visualization available (detailed reference material included)."
Link to Original Source
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Audio and video patents haunt Apple and Android

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "There seems to be no end to those smartphone patent suits. This week's special: audio and video patents that its owners claim are key to formats like MP3 and MPEG 2. The targets: Apple and Android. On Monday, Alcatel-Lucent subsidiary Multimedia Patent Trust filed a patent infringement suit in Southern California against Apple, LG (over 64 different phones including some Android-based ones), Canon and TiVo over four video patents. Fortunately for Apple and LG, none of the patents asserted against those two companies are likely to be in force by the time the judge decides, so there's no risk of an injunction. They may nevertheless have to pay for past damages. The same company once obtained a record $1.5 billion jury verdict against Microsoft but saw it slashed by a judge. And on Tuesday, Hybrid Audio LLC filed a suit in Eastern Texas, asserting a patent against various Apple products and certain Android-based products from HTC and Dell."
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ITC investigates Xbox 360 after Motorola complaint

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "The US International Trade Commission, which is increasingly popular as a patent enforcement agency, voted to investigate a complaint filed by Motorola against Microsoft last month. Motorola claims that the Xbox infringes five of its patents. In October, Microsoft complained against Motorola, alleging patent infringement by its Android-based smartphones. Apple, Nokia and HTC are also involved with ITC investigations as complainants and respondents. A new one-page overview document shows the ongoing ITC investigations related to smartphones and the products that the complainants would like to be banned from entry into the US market. The good news is that any import bans won't be ordered until long after Christmas. The ITC is faster than courts, but not that fast."
Link to Original Source
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Oracle and Myriad Group sue each other over Java

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "Bloomberg was first to report on a suit filed by mobile software company Myriad Group against Oracle in Delaware on Friday. The Swiss company, which sells its own Java implementation for mobile devices, claims Oracle doesn't honor its licensing commitments and overcharged Myriad and its customers by at least $120 million. Observers see a potential Google hand in this, given the obvious connection with the dispute between Oracle and Google. It turns out that on the same day Oracle sued Myriad (in Northern California) for infringement of the Java trademark. Oracle says Myriad stopped paying royalties more than a year ago and demanded a royalty-free license, which Oracle apparently isn't willing to grant. The Apache Foundation finds itself in a similar situation--but not in court (yet)."
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Apple vs. Motorola: now 42 patents-in-suit (24+18)

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "Apple's patent dispute with Motorola is one of the biggest legal battles going on at the moment. Apple, which is also entangled in litigation with Nokia and HTC, recently beefed up its legal team, but it also keeps throwing in ever more patents. Apple made important court filings on Wednesday and Thursday. The bottom line: Apple now asserts 24 patents against Motorola, which uses 18 patents in claims against Apple. 21 of Apple's infringement allegations relate to Android, 3 to Motorola set-top boxes and DVRs. Motorola targets the whole range of Apple products."
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Next Android patent suit: Vertical vs. Samsung, LG

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "Yesterday, Vertical Computer Systems filed a patent infringement suit in Eastern Texas against Android device makers Samsung and LG as well as Internet software company Interwoven. Vertical asserts a patent over which it previously sued Microsoft. That case was settled with a license deal. Earlier this year the USPTO granted Vertical a continuation patent extending the original one by another 32 claims. In an SEC filing, the company already announced its plan to exploit the extended version of the patent aggressively. This is just the latest in a series of suits relating to the Android operating system. Google also has to defend itself directly against Oracle but so far hasn't countersued anyone attacking Android."
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Motorola countersues Microsoft over 16 patents

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "As if there weren't already enough patent suits related to smartphone technologies, Motorola just announced its widely anticipated countersuit against Microsoft. Its subsidiary Motorola Mobility filed complaints with two US District Courts (Southern District of Florida and Western District of Wisconsin). Motorola already litigates with Apple in those and other courts. According to Motorola, the patents relate to technologies in the fields of operating systems, video codecs, email, instant messaging, object-oriented software architectures, WiFi, and graphical passwords. Motorola claims Windows, the Live messenger, Windows Phone, Outlook and other Microsoft products infringe. Motorola's action is no surprise given that all of the companies sued over patent infringement by Android--with the exception of Google--have already countersued."
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ITC deals Apple a setback in Nokia patent case

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "In February, Apple asked the US International Trade Commission to ban the entry of several Nokia products into the US market because of patent infringement. In a pre-trial hearing that started this week, the ITC staff presented an analysis according to which "the evidence will not establish a violation ... as to any of the asserted patents", reports the IDG News Service. However, most media reports don't mention that this relates to only four of the patents Apple asserted against Nokia. The case hit a fork in the road back in April. Nokia's alleged infringement of five other patents now forms part of the case Apple filed against HTC. Even if those four patents turned out invalid (or valid but not infringed), Apple could still prevail over Nokia. Also, not counting the patents the ITC views skeptically, Apple has 24 different patents in play against HTC and Motorola. Android has become a popular target of patent suits."
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ITC deals Apple a setback in Nokia patent case

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "Computerworld reports that the US International Trade Commission takes Nokia's side in a patent battle in which Apple wants a number of Nokia phones to be banned from entry into the US market. According to a preliminary analysis by the ITC staff (which could theoretically still be overruled), "the evidence will not establish a violation ... as to any of the asserted patents." But this relates to only four of the patents Apple asserted. The original complaint listed five more patents but those are now part of a case involving HTC as well. Three of the four patents analyzed by the ITC so far are also used against Android phone makers HTC and Motorola in different US district courts. But so are 24 others, including several multi-touch patents. Even after the ITC's findings, Android still faces essentially the same crossfire of patents."
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USITC could ban Motorola Droid within 18 months

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "In addition to suing Motorola in a district court, Microsoft also lodged a complaint with the US International Trade Commission. The USITC provides a fast track to an injunction: while court cases most often take years, the USITC could ban imports of Motorola Droid phones within about 18 months. Apple's complaint against HTC was also filed with the USITC in addition to a court. Oracle could complain against vendors of Android-based phones to step up pressure on Google. At any rate, Android is caught in a formidable crossfire of patents covering a wide range of technologies."
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Accusations Flying in EU Open Standards Debate

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "The EU still hasn't finalized its European Interoperability Framework v2, a set of IT procurement guidelines focused on interoperability and avoiding lock-in. Glyn Moody reported on "Double standards on open standards", mentioning the Free Software Foundation Europe and criticizing the position of the Business Software Alliance. In the ensuing discussion, FSFE president Karsten Gerloff and FSFE counsel Carlo Piana face tough questions about why their organization lobbies for "open standards" hand in hand with IBM, Oracle and Google, given that IBM is being investigated by the EU over a mainframe interoperability issue, Oracle doesn't turn Java into an open standard, and Google's search index is also closed."
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The mainframe monopoly absorbing enterprise clouds

FlorianMueller FlorianMueller writes  |  more than 3 years ago

FlorianMueller (801981) writes "The European Commission's antitrust investigations against IBM has a cloud aspect. The probes were launched only a week after the new zEnterprise mainframe, a device that IBM calls a "system of systems" or "datacenter in a box". It "assimilates Unix and Linux servers", said a Trekkie at V3.co.uk. Fantasy fans might call it "one box to rule them all." With 80% of the world's business data residing on mainframes, many enterprise clouds (private, public and hybrid) will need to be tethered to a mainframe. An entire datacenter can now come under the control of one administrative tool (Tivoli). However, IBM doesn't allow the opposite approach: the execution of mainframe legacy workloads on Intel-based servers through virtualization."
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